General Education Courses

Courses Sorted by General Education Category

Courses Sorted by Subject Area
(Course Prefix)

 

African American Studies (AFS)

Anthropology (ANT)

Arabic (ARB)

Armenian (ARM)

Art Education (AED)

Art: Fashion Design and Merchandising (AFA)

Art History (A H)

Art: Graphic Design (AGD)

Art: Industrial Design (AID)

Art: Interior Design (AIA)

Art: Special Seminars (ACS)

Asian Studies (ASN)

Astronomy (AST)

 

Biological Sciences (BIO)

Biomedical Engineering (BME)

Business Administration (B A)

 

Chemical Engineering (CHE)

Chemistry (CHM)

Chinese (CHI)

Civil and Environmental Engineering (C E)

Classics (CLA)

Clinical Laboratory Science (CLS)

Communication (COM)

Computer Science (CSC)

Construction Management Technology (CMT)

Criminal Justice (CRJ)

 

Dance (DNC)

 

Economics (ECO)

Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE)

Engineering Technology (E T)

English (ENG)

 

French (FRE)

 

Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies (GSW)

Geography (GPH)

Geology (GEL)

German (GER)

Greek, Ancient (GKA)

Greek, Modern (GKM)

 

Health Education (H E)

Hebrew (HEB)

History (HIS)

Honors (HON)

 

Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering (I E)

 

Italian (ITA)

 

Japanese (JPN)

 

Kinesiology (KIN)

 

Labor Studies (LBS)

Latin (LAT)

Latino/a and Latin American Studies (LAS)

 

Mathematics (MAT)

Mechanical Engineering (M E)

Mortuary Science (M S)

Music History (MUH)

 

Near Eastern Studies (N E)

Nursing (NUR)

Nutrition and Food Science (NFS)

 

Occupational Therapy (O T)

 

Pharmacy Practice (PPR)

Philosophy (PHI)

Physics (PHY)

Polish (POL)

Political Science (P S)

Psychology (PSY)

 

Radiation Technology (R T)

Russian (RUS)

 

Slavic (SLA)

Social Work (S W)

Sociology (SOC)

Spanish (SPA)

Speech-Language Pathology (SLP)

Swahili (SWA)

 

Teacher Education (TED)

Theatre (THR)

 

Urban Studies (U S)

Ukrainian (UKR)

 

African American Studies (AFS)

2210    (SS) Black Social and Political Thought. Cr.    4

Core requirement for African American Studies majors. Survey of the Black intellectual and political tradition from the United States, the Caribbean and Africa.    (T)

2390    (ENG 2390) (IC) Introduction to African-American Litera­ture: Literature and Writing. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020, ENG 1050, former ISP 1510, or equiv. (equiv. means AP credit, IB, CLEP, or transfer credit with grade of C or better). Introduction to major themes and some major writers of African-American literature, emphasizing modern works. Reading and writing about representative poetry, fiction, essays, and plays.    (T)

3250    (FC) Politics and Culture in Anglophone Caribbean. Cr.    3

Survey of political, economic and cultural life of the Caribbean. Rela­tionship of the Caribbean to U.S. and world political and cultural developments. Interdisciplinary approach: historical, comparative, thematic issues.    (Y)

3610    (FC) Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Foreign Culture: The Africans. Cr.    4

Prereq: upper division standing. Humanistic aspects, history, socio-cultural institutions of African cultures; theory and methods, compar­ativist perspectives.    (Y)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in African American Stud­ies. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing, consent of instructor; coreq: AFS 3160, 3180, 3200, 3250, 3420, 3610, or 5110. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for African American Studies majors. Disciplined writing assignments under the direction of a fac­ulty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a designated core­quisite; see section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writ­ing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

 

Anthropology (ANT)

2100    (SS) Introduction to Anthropology. Cr.    3-4

Required for majors. Study of humanity, past and present: cultural diversity and change, human evolution, biological variability, archae­ology, ethnography, language, and contemporary uses of anthropol­ogy.    (T)

2110    (LS) Introduction to Physical Anthropology. Cr.    3

Required for majors. Role of hereditary and environmental factors, human genetics, meaning of "race" and racial classifications, fossil records, non-human primate behavior and evolution.    (T)

3150    (FC) Anthropology of Business. Cr.    3-4

Differences between American culture/business practice and the cul­ture/business practice of other countries: assumptions, world view and family structure, organization and language.    (T)

3200    (HS) Lost Cities and Ancient Civilizations. Cr.    3

Required for majors. Early civilizations that developed in different parts of the world in comparative perspective. Hypotheses to explain rise and fall of civilizations, in context of ancient cultures. Basics of archaeology: how facts are formed; meaning of "civilization." How understanding of the past shapes understanding of the present. Geared toward the non-major.    (Y)

3520    (FC) Understanding Africa: Past, Present and Future. Cr.    3

In-depth knowledge of Africa through the study of its physiography, prehistory and history, social institutions, and social changes within a global context.    (T)

3540    (FC) Cultures and Societies of Latin America. Cr.    3

Latin American social structures and cultural variation, history, and relationship to the United States. Themes include class, race, ethnic­ity, gender, religion, globalization, and immigration to the United States.    (I)

3550    (FC) Arab Society in Transition. (N E 3550) Cr.    3

Distinctive social and cultural institutions and processes of change in the Arab Middle East. Regional variations: background and discus­sion of current political and economic systems and their relationship to international systems.    (I)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Anthropology. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing, satisfactory completion of the IC require­ment, consent of instructor; coreq: ANT 5310 or 5996 taught by full-time faculty member. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a course designated as a corequisite. See section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing-Intensive Course in the Major requirement. Within first three weeks of enrollment in corequi­site course, student must notify instructor of enrollment in ANT 5993.    (T)

Arabic (ARB)

2010    (FC) Intermediate Arabic I. Cr.    4

Prereq: ARB 1020 or consent of instructor. Continuation of grammar, readings in classical and modern prose. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (F)

Armenian (ARM)

3410    (SLA 3410) (FC) New Soil, Old Roots: The Immigrant Experience. (GER 3410) (POL 3410) (RUS 3410) (UKR 3410) Cr.    3

Armenian, German, Jewish, Polish, Russian and Ukrainian immigra­tion to the United States, its effects on the cultures (language, litera­ture, religion, politics, music, art and theatre) of these ethnic groups and its influence upon American culture.    (F)

Art Education (AED)

5050    (VP) Integrating the Arts into the Elementary Classroom. Cr.    3

Undergrad. prereq: Level II only, ELE 3320 plus two methods courses; graduate prereq: MAT degree student, TED 5150 as part of professional sequence. Introductory course: integration of visual arts, music, dance, and theatre into the teaching, learning and curriculum of the elementary classroom. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (F,W)

Art: Fashion Design and Merchandising (AFA)

5997    (WI) Seminar. Cr.    3

Prereq: senior standing and satisfactory completion of the IC require­ment. Open only to upper division design majors in B.A., B.S., or M.A. program. Offered for undergraduate credit only. Topics to be announced in Schedule of Classes. Course satisfies the General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (W)

Art History (A H)

1110    (VP) Survey of Art History: Ancient through Medieval. Cr.    3-4

Offered for four credits only to Honors students. Survey of traditions and major developments in visual expression in the West, prehistory through Medieval period. Art studied in context of its cultures; tech­niques of visual analysis.    (T)

1120    (VP) Survey of Art History: Renaissance through Mod­ern. Cr.    3-4

Offered for four credits to Honors students only. Traditions and devel­opments in visual expression in the West, Renaissance through twentieth century. Art in context of its cultures; techniques of visual analysis.    (T)

1130    (VP) Encounters with the Arts of Global Africa. Cr.    3

Introductory survey of the arts of Africa and the African Diaspora, focusing on the visual culture of cross-cultural contact within Africa and beyond.    (F,W)

4240    (HON 4240) (VP) Seminar in Visual and Performing Arts. (A H 4240) Cr.    3 (Max. 9)

Prereq: junior standing or above in College of Fine, Performing and Communication Arts, or Honors College; consent of instructor. Histor­ical examination of role and function of art and the visual artist in modern society; includes service learning component in which stu­dents engage in projects relating to the visual or performance arts in the Detroit community.    (Y)

5090    (WI) Theory and Methods of Art Historical Research. Cr.    3

Prereq: consent of instructor. Introduction to the methods of research in art history. History of the discipline's methodology examined through selective readings.    (I)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Fine Arts. Cr.    0

Open only to undergraduate art history majors in B.A. or B.F.A. pro­gram. Prereq: junior standing, satisfactory completion of the IC requirement, completion of A H 1110 and A H 1120 and one other A H course at 2000-level or above; coreq: A H course at 3000-level or above. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors.    (F,W)

Art: Graphic Design (AGD)

5260    (WI) Senior Seminar. Cr.    3

Prereq: senior standing. Open only to upper division art majors in B.A. or B.F.A. program; or M.A. program art majors. Issues affecting the theory, history, and practice of design; impact of design on soci­ety and impact of society on design. Required readings, student pre­sentations, class discussion, slide lectures, guest speakers. Satisfies the General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major require­ment. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (W)

Art: Industrial Design (AID)

5997    (WI) Senior Seminar. Cr.    3

Prereq: senior standing in industrial design concentration. Open only to senior art majors in B.A. or B.F.A. program, or art M.A. students. Seminar on contemporary issues in industrial design including pro­fessional concerns in transportation and product design, presenta­tion, and production. Satisfies the General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (B)

Art: Interior Design (AIA)

5997    (WI) Senior Seminar. Cr.    3

Prereq: consent of instructor. Open only to senior art majors in B.A. or B.F.A. program, or art majors in M.A. program. Investigation of designers, styles, and periods of interior design through charettes and documentation. Resume and portfolio development and review; writing of intensive research paper. Material Fee announced in Schedule of Classes.    (W)

Art: Special Seminars (ACS)

5997    (WI) Senior Seminar in the Visual Arts. Cr.    3

Prereq: prior consent of undergraduate advisor. Open only to senior art majors in B.F.A. program. Offered for undergraduate credit only. Interdisciplinary seminar on contemporary issues in the visual arts including studio practices, history, and criticism. Satisfies the General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (F,W)

Asian Studies (ASN)

1710    (HIS 1710) (HS) History of Modern East Asia. Cr.    3

Offered for undergraduate credit only. From beginning of nineteenth century to the present; emphasis on political, social, economic devel­opments in China, Japan and Korea.    (I)

2150    (PHI 2150) (FC) Chinese Philosophy. Cr.    3

Main philosophical traditions from ancient to pre-Communist China. Readings from Confucianism. Taoism, Mohism, Legalism, Buddhism, Neo-Confucianism, and the Chinese Enlightenment.    (W)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Asian Studies. Cr.    0

Coreq: enrollment in any Asian Studies course of 3000-level or above. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for majors. Disciplined writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a designated corequisite. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Inten­sive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

Astronomy (AST)

2010    (PS) Descriptive Astronomy. Cr.    4

Meets General Education Laboratory requirement only when taken with Coreq: AST 2011. Lecture course that introduces the concepts and methods of modern astronomy, the solar system, stars, galaxies, and cosmology; recent discoveries about planets, moons, the sun, pulsars, quasars, and black holes.    (T)

4200    (WI) Astronomical Laboratory. Cr.    2

Coreq: AST 4100 or consent of instructor. Introduction to laboratory techniques of modern astrophysics. Optical astronomy, including measurement of the quantum efficiency of a CCD-based astronomi­cal digital camera; measurement of the throughput as a function of wavelength of a set of standard astronomical filters; measurement of the HR diagram of a star cluster using the calibrated camera and fil­ters. Material fee as indicated in Schedule of Classes.    (F)

Biological Sciences (BIO)

1030    (LS) Biology Today. Cr.    3 (LCT: 3; or LCT: 3; DSC: 1)

Not for biology major credit. Offered for four credits to Honors stu­dents only. Challenges to modern society from population growth, new diseases, environmental degradation, urban pollution; medical advances and ethical dilemmas in decoding human genome; impact of biological findings on political and personal decisions; issues con­sidered in context of principles and strategies of modern biological research.    (F,W)

1050    (LS) An Introduction to Life. Cr.    3-4 (LCT: 3; or LCT: 3: LAB: 3)

Meets General Education Laboratory Requirement when elected for 4 credits. For the non-science major and as a prereq. to BIO 1500/1510. No credit after BIO 1500 or BIO 1510. A factual and concep­tual treatment of modern biology at the cell, organismal, and popula­tion levels of organization. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

1510    (LS) Basic Life Mechanisms. Cr.    4 (LAB: 3: LCT: 3)

Prereq: BIO 1050 with grade of C-minus or above; or ACT score of 21 or above (ACT scores valid for only 2 years); or passing score on BIO placement exam; or BIO 1500 with grade of C-minus or above. Only Engineering students may elect for three credits. BIO 1500 and BIO 1510 required of all biological sciences majors. Factual and con­ceptual treatment of cell molecules, cell structure, metabolism, genetics, and development. For the science major and certain pre-professional programs. Meets General Education laboratory require­ment. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

2200    (LS) Introductory Microbiology. Cr.    4 (LAB: 4: LCT: 3)

Prereq: BIO 1510 with grade of C-minus or above; BIO 1500 recom­mended for Biology majors. Bacteria and their basic biology; the rela­tionship of microorganisms to man and other living forms, including their ecological importance and their role in the causation of disease; laboratory exercises paralleling the above principles. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

4110    (WI) Biomedical Technology and Molecular Biology. Cr.    4

Prereq: BIO 3070 and BIO 3100 with grades of C-minus or above. General principles of molecular biology of prokaryotes and eukary­otes. Includes structures of DNA, RNA, and protein, DNA replication and repair, transcription and translation, gene regulation and gene expression. Emphasis on applications in medical biology and bio­technology. Fulfills General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement; each student writes reports and one long research paper on topic approved by instructor, in addition to other course writing requirements.    (F)

4120    (WI) Comparative Physiology. Cr.    4 (LCT: 3)

Prereq: BIO 3070 and BIO 3200 with grades of C-minus or above. Physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels. Comparison of major physiological systems across groups of organisms. Lab consists of physiology exercises and lab reports that allow students to explore major conceptual themes in physiology. Fulfills General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement; each student writes reports, and one long research paper on topic approved by instructor, in addition to other course writ­ing requirements. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

4130    (WI) General Ecology. Cr.    4 (LAB: 3: LCT: 3)

Prereq: BIO 3070 and BIO 3500 with grades of C-minus or above, or consent of instructor; consent of departmental advisor for Environ­mental Sciences majors. Principles of population, community, eco­system, and landscape ecology. Fulfills General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement; each student writes reports and one long research paper on topic approved by instructor, in addition to other course writing requirements. Material Fee As Indi­cated In The Schedule of Classes    (W)

Biomedical Engineering (BME)

4910    (WI) Biomedical Engineering Capstone Design I. Cr.    3

Open only to students in the Biomedical Engineering program. Pre­req: BME 3920; senior standing. First in a two-semester sequence during which student teams develop a design to address a biomedi­cal engineering challenge; includes discussions with clinical faculty, analysis of current solutions, and finalization of conceptual design.    (F)

Business Administration (B A)

1010    (CT) Critical Thinking for Consumer Decisions. Cr.    3

Open only to students in Business Administration undergraduate degree programs or students in design and merchandising program. Development of critical thinking skills and the application of these skills in evaluation and decisions for a broad range of consumer issues including advertising interpretations, purchase decisions, job applications, and consumer protection.    (T)

Chemical Engineering (CHE)

4800    (WI) Chemical Process Integration. Cr.    3

Prereq: CHE 4200. Open only to students enrolled in professional engineering programs. Application of engineering and science back­ground to the design of chemical processes. Comprehensive prob­lems deal with sources of data, design principles and optimization techniques.    (F)

6810    (WI) Chemical Engineering Research Project. Cr.    4

Prereq: CHE 4200, CHE 5710, and written consent of advisor. Appli­cation of engineering and science background to the completion of a senior research project. Methods of research and analysis and inter­pretation of data. Preparation of a written research paper; oral pre­sentation of research results.    (W)

Chemistry (CHM)

1000    (PS) Chemistry and Your World. Cr.    4

Meets General Education Laboratory Requirement when elected for 4 credits. Facts and theories from analytical, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry, and from biochemistry; their consequences in life processes and the environment. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (F,W)

1020    (PS) Survey of General Chemistry. Cr.    4

Prereq: Math Department placement beyond MAT 0993; or grade of C or above in MAT 0993; or validated ACT Math score of 18 or above. Meets General Education Laboratory Requirement. High school chemistry not required. First course in the terminal sequence consisting of CHM 1020 and CHM 1030. Matter and energy in chem­istry, chemical symbols and equations, structure and properties of atoms, introduction to chemical bonding; periodicity in chemistry, sol­ids, liquids, gases, solutions, acids and bases, and equilibrium. Mate­rial Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (F,W)

1220    (PS) General Chemistry I. Cr.    4

Prereq: passing score on chemistry placement exam or CHM 1040 with grade of C-minus or above; Math Department placement in or beyond MAT 1800; coreq: CHM 1230. Satisfies General Education laboratory requirement upon completion of both CHM 1220 and 1230. Only two credits if taken after CHM 1020. No credit after if f taken after CHM 1225. Introduction to the principles of chemistry for students with high school background in chemistry. Chemical struc­ture, bonding, and reactivity.    (T)

1225    (PS) General Chemistry I for Engineers. Cr.    3

Open only to students in College of Engineering. Prereq: passing score on chemistry placement exam or CHM 1040 with grade of C-minus or above; Math Department placement in or beyond MAT 1800; coreq: CHM 1230. Satisfies General Education laboratory requirement upon completion of both CHM 1225 and 1230. Only one credit after CHM 1020. No credit after CHM 1220. Introduction to principles of chemistry for students with high school background in chemistry. Chemical structure, bonding, and reactivity.    (T)

1410    (PS) Chemical Principles I: General/Organic Chemistry. Cr.    6

Prereq: advanced placement in chemistry with a score of 3, 4, or 5; or outstanding performance on chemistry placement exam; or evi­dence of superior academic potential; or consent of instructor. Meets General Education laboratory requirement. Accelerated approach to blended general/organic chemistry. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (I)

5550    (WI) Physical Chemistry Laboratory. Cr.    2

Prereq. or coreq: CHM 5400 or CHM 5420 or CHM 5440 or equiv.; and PHY 2180 or equiv. Principles of measurement. Fundamental investigations of thermodynamics. Fundamental spectroscopic and kinetic measurements. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (F,W)

6610    (WI) Biological Chemistry Laboratory. Cr.    3

Prereq: a grade of C or above in CHM 6620 or equiv. Open only to chemistry majors. Basic experiments in isolation, purification, and analysis of biomolecules. Techniques currently used in molecular biology and recombinant DNA procedures stressed. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (F,W)

Chinese (CHI)

2010    (FC) Intermediate Chinese. Cr.    4

Prereq: CHI 1020 or consent of instructor. Completion of Chinese language sequence. Material fee as given in Schedule of Classes.    (Y)

Civil and Environmental Engineering (C E)

4995    (WI) Senior Design Project. Cr.    3

Prereq: senior standing in civil engineering. Open only to students enrolled in professional engineering programs. Capstone design experience through civil engineering projects. Satisfies General Edu­cation Writing Intensive requirement.    (W)

Classics (CLA)

1010    (PL) Classical Civilization. Cr.    3-4

Survey of the culture and civilization of Ancient Greece and Rome, in particular those aspects that laid the political, social, and cultural framework of the modern world.    (T)

2200    (PL) Introduction to Greek Tragedy. Cr.    3-4

Dramatic and literary qualities of representative plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides. The origin and development of Greek trag­edy related to the enduring quality and contemporary relevance of these dramas.    (T)

2300    (PL) Ancient Comedy. Cr.    3

Dramatic and literary qualities of representative plays of Aristo­phanes, Menander, Plautus and Terence. Origins and development of Greek Comedy related to the enduring quality and contemporary relevance of these dramas and their influence on later literature.    (T)

3590    (GKM 3590) (HS) Byzantine Civilization. (CLA 5590) (GKM 5590) Cr.    3

Survey of Byzantine culture, religion, society, and literature from late Antiquity to 1453, through secondary and primary sources in transla­tion.    (Y)

3720    (GKM 3720) (HS) Modern Greek Cities: An Historical-Eth­nographic Study. (GKM 5720) (CLA 5720) Cr.    3

Historical and ethnographic survey of the communities and culture of modern Greek urban centers, from the early modern period to the present.    (I)

5720    (GKM 3720) (HS) Modern Greek Cities: An Historical-Eth­nographic Study. (GKM 5720) (CLA 3720) Cr.    3

Offered for graduate credit only. Historical and ethnographic survey of the communities and culture of modern Greek urban centers, from the early modern period to the present.    (Y)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Classical Civilization. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing, satisfactory completion of the IC require­ment, consent of instructor; coreq: any CLA, GKA, GKM, or LAT course numbered 3000 or higher which satisfies the major require­ment. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Grade in CLA 5993 is independent of grade in corequi­site course. Disciplined writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a designated corequisite; see section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequi­sites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

 

Clinical Laboratory Science (CLS)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Clinical Laboratory Sci­ence. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing, satisfactory completion of the IC require­ment, consent of instructor; coreq: any 3000-level or higher course in the department and written consent of chairperson. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Course must be elected in conjunction with designated corequisite; see Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

Communication (COM)

1010    (OC) Oral Communication: Basic Speech. Cr.    3

No credit after former SPB 2000. No new students admitted after first week of classes. Beginning course emphasizing fundamentals of speech preparation. Development of poise and confidence in speak­ing.    (T)

2010    (ENG 2450) (VP) Introduction to Film. Cr.    4

Examination of film techniques and basic methods of film analysis. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

2020    (ENG 2460) (VP) History of Film. Cr.    3

Critical study of the motion picture as a modern visual art; screening and analysis of representative fiction films to illustrate historical peri­ods and genres. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

2110    (CT) Argumentation and Debate. Cr.    3

Prereq: COM 1010 or equiv. Logical and legal foundation of the argu­mentation process; practical experience in analysis, reasoning, case-building, evaluation of evidence, refutation and cross-examination.    (T)

2160    (PL) Contemporary Persuasive Campaigns and Move­ments. Cr.    3

Critical discussion of the social foundations and values underlying human persuasion. Analysis of persuasive strategies and techniques used in contemporary society: political campaigns, social move­ments, advertising and consumerism in the U.S.    (T)

2230    (WI) Broadcast News Writing and Digital Editing. Cr.    3

Prereq: COM 1500; must have access to an audio recorder. Theory and practice in broadcast newswriting, reporting, performing and editing. Writing Intensive course for broadcasting sequence in Jour­nalism major. Material Fee as indicated in the Schedule of Classes    (T)

3010    (WI) Media Analysis and Criticism. Cr.    3

Prereq: COM 1500 with grade of C or above, or consent of instructor. Open only to department majors. Formal properties and aesthetic considerations in media, especially film, television and interactive media. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

3300    (WI) Business and Professional Presentations. Cr.    3

Prereq: ENG 3010 with grade of C or above; and COM 1010. Review and practice of various oral communication forms used in modern organizations. Topics include persuasive speaking, informative speaking, speech writing, multi-media presentations and business and report writing. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

3400    (WI) Theories of Communication. Cr.    3

Exploration of the role of theory in describing, explaining and predict­ing human communication behavior in face-to-face and mediated contexts.    (T)

4100    (WI) Feature Writing. Cr.    3

Prereq: COM 3100 with grade of C or above. Advanced news report­ing, focusing on feature writing. Material Fee as given in Schedule of Classes.    (T)

4170    (WI) Public Relations Writing. Cr.    3

Prereq: COM 2030 and COM 3170 with grade of C or above. Writing for public relations purposes: backgrounders, fact sheets, press releases; brochures and newsletters.    (F,W)

4560    (WI) Telecommunications Policy: A Political Economy Approach. Cr.    3

Prereq: COM 1500. Satisfies the University General Education Writ­ing Intensive Course in the Major requirement, in the Media Arts and Studies curriculum. Introduction to both the process of developing telecommunications policies and the impact of these policies in the United States.    (W)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing, written consent of instructor, satisfactory completion of the IC requirement. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all Film Studies majors. Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a designated corequisite; see section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

Computer Science (CSC)

1050    Introduction to C and Unix. Cr.    2

Prereq: MAT 1800. No credit for computer science students after CSC 1100. Introduction to Unix, Unix editor, and C Programming Language. Unix development tools and fundamentals of C language discussed. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

1500    Fundamental Structures in Computer Science. Cr.    3

Prereq: CSC 1100 and CSC 1101, both with grade of C or better; and MAT 1800 with grade of C-minus or better; coreq: CSC 1501. Intro­duction to fundamental control and data structures in computer sci­ence such as algorithms and complexity; recursive algorithms; program correctness using the predicate calculus; reasoning about algorithms using mathematical induction; divide and conquer algo­rithms; recurrence relations; set properties and their computation; and computing with relations. Graph properties and their computa­tion, and tree properties and their computation, will be covered if time permits.    (T)

2110    Computer Science I. Cr.    3

Prereq: one of the following: successfully pass Computer Science Placement Exam, or CSC 1100 and CSC 1101, each with grade of C or better; MAT 1800 with grade of C-minus or better; coreq: CSC 2111. Rigorous introduction to fundamental object-oriented concepts and techniques of computer programming using an object-oriented language. Introduction to data abstraction; design of abstract data types. Introduction to recursion; programming with generic data types; inheritance; polymorphism; and exception handlers. Concepts applied to console programs and event-driven programming using a simple graphics API.    (T)

4996    (WI) Senior Project and Computer Ethics. Cr.    3

Prereq: CSC 4110 and CSC 4111, both with grade of C-minus or bet­ter; senior standing in computer science; coreq: CSC 4997. Develop­ment of skills for planning, managing, implementing, and documenting complex software projects; legal, social and ethical issues in software development and computer use. Project manage­ment techniques; professional conduct, social responsibility, liability, ownership of information, privacy, security and crime.    (F,W)

Construction Management Technology (CMT)

4200    (WI) Senior Project. Cr.    3

Prereq: senior standing; for students in B.S. in construction manage­ment major. Capstone project; senior students work in teams; appli­cation of skills, knowledge, techniques and concepts. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (W)

Criminal Justice (CRJ)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Criminal Justice. Cr.    0

Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for CRJ majors. Prereq: completion of General Education BC and IC require­ments, submission of Writing Intensive (CRJ 5993) contract, signed by co-requisite instructor, to major advisor before the end of the sec­ond week of the semester; coreq: one of the following: CRJ 3200, CRJ 3350, CRJ 3550, or CRJ 3800. Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunc­tion with a course designated as a corequisite; see Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major require­ment. Students must submit and endorse the Writing Intensive (CRJ 5993 Contract stating the departmentally-approved requirements of the research writing project.    (T)

Dance (DNC)

2000    (VP) Introduction to World Dance. Cr.    3

Global perspective on and definition of dance, through assigned readings, writing, field trips, and laboratory experience. Focus on multicultural diversity, interdependent nature of dance. Material Fee as indicated in Schedule of Classes.    (T)

2310    (VP) History of Dance from 1800 to the Present. Cr.    3

Introduction to critical dance studies and dance history from 1800-present. Impact of vernacular dance and historical ballet and modern concert dance on contemporary dance, examined formally and socio-culturally. How dance circulates globally as mediated and embodied history. Material Fee as indicated in Schedule of Classes.    (F,W)

2400    (FC) Introduction to African Dance. Cr.    3

Exploration of African and African derived dance forms, together with their integrated philosophy, music, art and theatre forms. Lectures, videos, concert attendance and reading assignments to learn and perform dances from selected African societies. Material Fee As Indi­cated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Dance. Cr.    0

Open only to undergraduates. Prereq: junior standing; satisfactory completion of the General Education IC requirement; consent of instructor; coreq: DNC 3310 or DNC 2300 or DNC 2310 or DNC 3810 or DNC4910. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required of all majors. Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a course designated as a corequisite. See Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

Economics (ECO)

1000    (SS) Survey of Economics. Cr.    4

Not for ECO major or minor credit. Scope of economics and the task of the economist in modern society; the market economy, its evolu­tion and development; non-market economies; economic problems and prospects in the contemporary world.    (T)

2010    (SS) Principles of Microeconomics. Cr.    3-4

(Note: ECO 2010 is not a prerequisite for ECO 2020.) Supply, demand, price at the level of the firm and industry; business institu­tions and their operation; determinants of wage and salary levels, interest rates, rent, profits, income distribution; public policy in rela­tion to business and labor.    (T)

2020    (SS) Principles of Macroeconomics. Cr.    3-4

(Note: ECO 2010 is not a prerequisite for ECO 2020.) Determination of national income, consumption and saving, and investment; money, banking and the Federal Reserve; inflation and unemployment; mon­etary and fiscal policy; economic growth and productivity; the interna­tional sector.    (T)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Economics. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing; satisfactory completion of the IC General Education requirement; consent of instructor; coreq: any ECO course at 5000-level or above. Offered for S and U grades only. Open only to undergraduates. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disci­plinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE)

4600    (WI) Capstone Design I. Cr.    4 (LCT: 4)

Prereq: ENG 3050, ECE 3570, ECE 3620, senior standing. Open only to students enrolled in professional engineering programs. Design principles, subsystems of microcontrollers; designing prod­ucts using microcontrollers, sensors and actuators.    (T)

Engineering Technology (E T)

2160    Computer Applications for Engineering Technology. Cr.    2

Prereq: EET 2000 or E T 2140. Various software programming envi­ronments and programming skills for engineering technology applica­tions, including programming logic, file IO, data acquisition and processing, computer simulation, and communication protocols.    (F,W)

4999    (WI) Senior Project. Cr.    3 (LAB: 3;DSC: 2)

Prereq: satisfactory completion of the IC requirement, COM 1010. Must be taken during last semester before graduation. Student designs, builds, and tests product; philosophy of design. Project pro­posal to be submitted by second week, final outcome to be com­pleted by thirteenth week; progress reports, and oral presentation required.    (F,W)

English (ENG)

1020    (BC) Introductory College Writing. Cr.    3

Prereq: placement through ACT score, English Qualifying Examina­tion, or passing grade in ENG 1010. A course in reading, research, and writing skills that prepares students to write successfully in col­lege classes.    (T)

1050    (BC) Freshman Honors: Introductory College Writing. Cr.    3

Open only to Honors Program students. A course in reading, research and writing skills that prepares students to write success­fully in college classes.    (F)

2100    (IC) Introduction to Poetry: Literature and Writing. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Introduction to techniques and forms of poetry through critical reading of, and writing about, poems of various types and from many periods.    (Y)

2110    (IC) Introduction to Drama: Literature and Writing. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Introduction to techniques and forms of drama through critical reading of, and writ­ing about, representative plays from various traditions and periods.    (Y)

2120    (IC) Introduction to Fiction: Literature and Writing. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Introduction to techniques and forms of fiction through critical reading of, and writing about, short stories and novels.    (T)

2200    (PL) Shakespeare. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Emphasis on the dramatic and literary qualities of the plays: representative comedies, tragedies and histories.    (T)

2210    (IC) Great English Novels: Literature and Writing. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Critical reading of, and writing about, a representative sample of important and pleasur­able English novels from the eighteenth century through the modern period.    (Y)

2310    (IC) Major American Books: Literature and Writing. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Critical reading of, and writing about, representative texts in prose, poetry, and drama by such writers as Emerson, Twain, Dickinson, O'Neill, Ellison.    (Y)

2390    (ENG 2390) (IC) Introduction to African-American Litera­ture: Literature and Writing. (AFS 2390) Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Introduction to major themes and some major writers of African-American literature, emphasizing modern works. Reading and writing about representa­tive poetry, fiction, essays, and plays.    (T)

2420    (IC) Literature and the Professions: Literature and Writ­ing. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Representations of the professions (law, medicine, etc.) in the world of literature.    (I)

2430    (PL) Electronic Literature. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Introductory study of digital narrative and electronic textuality, including a variety of digi­tal-born media such as online literature, gaming and interactive fic­tion.    (Y)

2440    (VP) Introduction to Visual Culture. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Introductory course in the reading of images from the perspective of literary and cultural studies. Attention to basic concepts, terms, and theories in the study of visual culture.    (Y)

2450    (VP) Introduction to Film. (COM 2010) Cr.    4

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Examination of film techniques and basic methods of film analysis. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

2500    (PL) The English Bible as Literature. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. The King James text as a literary masterpiece.    (I)

2510    (PL) Popular Literature. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Introductory study of popular literature. Content may include recent best-sellers, horror, science fiction and prize-winning novels.    (Y)

2560    (IC) Children's Literature: Literature and Writing. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Introductory course in writing about the Anglo-American tradition of classic and contemporary children's literature.    (T)

2570    (IC) Literature By and About Women: Literature and Writing. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Introduction to the major themes and issues of writing by and about women. Reading and writing about representative fictional and non-fictional works.    (T)

2670    (P S 2700) (FC) Introduction to Canadian Studies. (GPH 2700) (HIS 2700) Cr.    3

Survey of Canada in its cultural, literary, historical, geographical and political aspects; key concepts and social patterns that define the Canadian experience.    (Y)

2720    (PL) Basic Concepts in Linguistics. (LIN 2720) Cr.    3

Analysis of the structure and use of language, focusing on English, from the standpoint of current linguistic practice. Topics include: pho­netics and sound structure, word structure, syntax, semantics, lan­guage origin and history, dialects, language learning, animal communication, and language in social interaction.    (Y)

2730    (FC) Languages of the World. (LIN 2730) Cr.    3

Survey of structure of major language families of the world, western and non-western; interrelationships of language and culture; univer­sals and variations of universals in language and culture.    (Y)

3010    (IC) Intermediate Writing. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Course in reading, research and writing for upper-level students. Emphasis on conduct­ing research by drawing from the sciences, social sciences, human­ities, and professions in preparation for Writing Intensive courses in the majors.    (T)

3020    (IC) Writing and Community. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Students develop and write about community-based service-learning projects.    (F,W)

3050    (IC) Technical Communication I: Reports. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Instruction in basic technical writing skills. Requirements include writing summa­ries, letters, memos, instructions, and technical reports. Topics include audience and purpose analysis, textual and visual aspects of document design, and formatting.    (T)

3060    (OC) Technical Communication II: Presentations. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 3050 or equiv. Instruction in basic technical presentation skills. Requirements include informative presentations, oral briefings, needs assessments, progress reports, and formal proposals. Topics include collaborative teamwork, audi­ence and purpose analysis, textual and visual aspects of presenta­tion design, and formatting.    (T)

3110    (PL) English Literature to 1700. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Historical survey of British literature from the medieval period to 1700.    (F,W)

3120    (PL) English Literature after 1700. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Historical survey of British literature from 1700 to the present.    (F,W)

3130    (PL) American Literature to 1865. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Historical survey of American literature from its beginnings to 1865.    (F,W)

3140    (PL) American Literature after 1865. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Historical survey of American literature from the Civil War to the present.    (F,W)

3470    (PL) Survey of African-American Literature. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Historical survey of African-American literature from the early American period to the present.    (Y)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in English. Cr.    0

Prereq: satisfactory completion of General Education IC requirement, written consent of departmental Undergraduate Advisor; coreq: ENG 4991, ENG 5992, or an approved 5000-level ENG course. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disci­plinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

French (FRE)

2010    (FC) Intermediate French. Cr.    4

Prereq: FRE 1020 or placement. Continuing development of French language and Francophone cultural proficiency through interactive and communicative reading, writing, listening and speaking activities. Completion of this course fulfills the General education requirement for foreign language and culture. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

2700    (GER 2700) (PL) Anguish and Commitment: European Existentialist Literature. (ITA 2700) (RUS 2700) (SPA 2700) Cr.    3-4

Only students in Honors Program may register for four credits. A team-taught interdisciplinary study in English of representative works by European existentialist writers: Dostoevsky, Hesse, Kafka, Piran­dello, Sartre, Camus and Unamuno.    (B)

2710    (FC) Introduction to French Civilization I. Cr.    3

An overview of France's great contributions to world culture, from the time of the Gauls to the French Revolution. French history, thought, art, architecture, society, geography, and institutions; illustrated with slides and films; includes visits to Detroit Institute of Arts.    (T)

2720    (FC) Introduction to French Civilization II. Cr.    3

From the French Revolution to contemporary times. French way of life, its moral and intellectual foundations, its culture and institutions; their transformation under the stress of the twentieth century.    (B)

2991    (GER 2991) (PL) Understanding the Fairy Tale. Cr.    3

Fairy tale's meaning and role in Western society from the Brothers Grimm to Walt Disney. Methods of fairy-tale interpretation. All lec­tures and reading in English.    (B)

5100    (WI) Advanced Composition. Cr.    3

Prereq: any two of FRE 2100, 2110, 3200 or consent of instructor. Focus on advanced composition skills through a close analysis of dif­ferent types of texts with the goal of developing vocabulary and advanced writing and speaking abilities.    (W)

Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies (GSW)

2500    (PL) Humanities Perspectives on Gender, Sexuality, and Women. Cr.    3

Questions surrounding gender and sexuality, focusing on the ways in which they have been constructed and represented in different his­torical periods and geographical location through literature, film, visual objects, the media, and other texts.    (F,W)

2600    (HIS 2605) (HS) History of Women, Gender and Sexuality in the Modern World. Cr.    3

Examination of change over time; using different historical approaches to try to account for change , from a comparative per­spective, to the experiences of women and constructions of gender and sexual identity.    (F)

2700    (SS) Social Science Perspectives on Gender, Sexuality, and Women. Cr.    3

Understanding the ways in which political, social and cultural institu­tions shape gender, sexuality, and women's experiences within a local and global context.    (F,W)

 

Geography (GPH)

1100    (SS) World Regional Patterns. Cr.    4

Concepts and theory in analyzing areal relationships and distinguish­ing regional patterns of human activity; cultural factors and physical conditions (climate, landforms) as factors in regional delineations; comparisons and contrasts in regional economic development; anal­ysis of concentrations/dispersals of human activity; local, national and regional phenomena in the interpretation of global patterns.    (T)

2000    (U S 2000) (SS) Introduction to Urban Studies. (HIS 2000) (P S 2000) (SOC 2500) Cr.    4

Urban phenomena both past and present, including the quality and nature of urban life; major concerns of urban areas; perspectives and techniques of various urban-related disciplines.    (T)

2700    (P S 2700) (FC) Introduction to Canadian Studies. (ENG 2670) (HIS 2700) Cr.    3

Survey of Canada in its cultural, literary, historical, geographical and political aspects; key concepts and social patterns that define the Canadian experience.    (Y)

3130    (SS) Introductory Urban Geography. Cr.    4

An introduction to the geographer's view of cities, with emphasis on the North American city. Topics include the pre-industrial city, migra­tion, evolution of the American urban pattern, city classification, city-regional relationships, and the city's internal structure (ethnic, resi­dential, commercial, and industrial).    (Y)

3200    (SS) Europe. Cr.    3

Analysis of European countries. Emphasis on population changes resource problems, industrial location, urbanization, regional devel­opment, and emerging economic and political unities.    (I)

Geology (GEL)

1010    (PS) Geology: The Science of the Earth. Cr.    4

Meets General Education Laboratory Requirement. Introduction to continental drift and plate tectonic theory, geophysics and structure of earth's crust and interior; rocks and minerals; igneous and volcanic geology; work of running water, glaciers and ground water; geologic time; oceanography. One day field trip. Lecture and required labora­tory. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Geology. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing; satisfactory completion of the IC require­ment; consent of instructor; coreq: GEL 3160 or 3300 or 3400 or 3450. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with course desig­nated as corequisite. See section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (F,W)

German (GER)

2010    (FC) Intermediate German I. Cr.    4

Prereq: GER 1020 or placement. Continuation of GER 1020. Read­ing of graded German literature and grammar review. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

2310    (PL) Short Fiction from Central Europe and Russia. (SLA 2310) Cr.    3

Explores how writers use short fictional forms, such as parable, short story, fairy tale, and satire, to express important themes in the Cen­tral European experience, including violence and cruelty, freedom and imprisonment, utopian visions, and urban life.    (F)

2700    (PL) Anguish and Commitment: European Existentialist Literature. (FRE 2700) (ITA 2700) (RUS 2700) (SPA 2700) Cr.    3-4

Only students in Honors Program may register for four credits. A team-taught interdisciplinary study in English of representative works by European existentialist writers: Dostoevsky, Hesse, Kafka, Piran­dello, Sartre, Camus, and Unamuno.    (B)

2710    (FC) Survey of Germanic Culture I. Cr.    3

Development of Germanic people from their origin to 1835; their major contributions of cultural significance to the Western world.    (F)

2720    (FC) Survey of Germanic Culture II. Cr.    3

Development of Germanic people from 1835 to the present; the Nazi period; and World War II.    (W)

2991    (PL) Understanding the Fairy Tale. (FRE 2991) Cr.    3

Fairy tale's meaning and role in Western society from the Brothers Grimm to Walt Disney. Methods of fairy-tale interpretation. All lec­tures and reading in English.    (B)

3410    (SLA 3410) (FC) New Soil, Old Roots: The Immigrant Experience. (ARM 3410) (POL 3410) (RUS 3410) (UKR 3410) Cr.    3

Armenian, German, Jewish, Polish, Russian and Ukrainian immigra­tion to the United States, its effects on the cultures (language, litera­ture, religion, politics, music, art and theatre) of these ethnic groups and its influence upon American life.    (F)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in German. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing, satisfactory completion of the IC require­ment, consent of instructor; coreq: GER 4600 or any 5000-level Ger­man literature course. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a course designated as a corequisite; see section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (F,W)

Greek, Ancient (GKA)

2010    (FC) Intermediate Ancient Greek I. Cr.    4

Prereq: GKA 1020. Review of Greek grammar, and readings from selected Greek prose authors such as Plato and Lysias. Material Fee as given in Schedule of Classes.    (F)

Greek, Modern (GKM)

2010    (FC) Intermediate Modern Greek I. Cr.    4

Prereq: GKM 1020 or equiv. Review of grammar, practice in oral and written modern Greek, based on readings in modern Greek literature. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (F)

5720    (GKM 3720) (HS) Modern Greek Cities: An Historical-Eth­nographic Study. (CLA 3720) (CLA 5720) Cr.    3

Offered for graduate credit only. Historical and ethnographic survey of the communities and culture of modern Greek urban centers, from the early modern period to the present.    (Y)

3590    (HS) Byzantine Civilization. (GKM 5590) (CLA 3590) (CLA 5590) Cr.    3

Survey of Byzantine culture, religion, society, and literature from late Antiquity to 1453, through secondary and primary sources in transla­tion.    (Y)

3710    (FC) Modern Greek Literature and Culture in English. Cr.    3-4

No knowledge of modern Greek required for this course; all readings in English translation; satisfies General Education requirement in Foreign Culture; does not satisfy foreign language requirement. Stu­dents wishing to take the Honors option should enroll for four credits. Survey of the culture and civilization of modern Greece through a study of modern Greek history, religion, and literary traditions.    (I)

3720    (HS) Modern Greek Cities: An Historical-Ethnographic Study. (GKM 5720) (CLA 3720) (CLA 5720) Cr.    3

Historical and ethnographic survey of the communities and culture of modern Greek urban centers, from the early modern period to the present.    (Y)

Health Education (H E)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Health Education. Cr.    0

Open only to Health Education majors. Coreq: KHS 5522. Disciplined writing assignments under direction of a faculty member. Must be taken with KHS 5522. Satisfies University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (F)

6430    (WI) School Health Curriculum. Cr.    3

Offered for S and U grades only. Prereq: H E 3330 or H E 6500. Prin­ciples and application of school health programming. Philosophy and foundations of health education, conducting a needs assessment and design instruction based on the assessment, implementing and evaluating the instruction, implementation of skills in a secondary classroom, assessment of the process. Satisfies General Education program Writing Intensive requirement for health teaching majors.    (W)

Hebrew (HEB)

2010    (FC) Intermediate Hebrew I. Cr.    4

Prereq: HEB 1020 or consent of instructor. Reading of additional cul­tural texts. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (F)

3240    (N E 3240) (PL) Survey of Modern Hebrew Literature in English Translation. Cr.    3

Modern Hebrew literature from the end of the nineteenth century to the present; includes major authors from the European, pre-state and Israeli periods. Texts are in English.    (F)

History (HIS)

1000    (HS) World Civilization to 1500. Cr.    3-4

No credit after HIS 1100 or HIS 1200. Survey of ancient and medie­val history from the Neolithic Revolution to 1500.    (T)

1050    (AI) American Civilization Since World War II. Cr.    3-4

Recent American ideas, institutions, and social movements within the broad context of global change and conflicts.    (B)

1300    (HS) Europe and the World: 1500-1945. Cr.    3-4

No credit after former HIS 1300 or former HIS 2870. The rise of the modern West and the response of the non-West from the age of exploration to the end of World War II. The foundations of the con­temporary world.    (T)

1400    (HS) The World Since 1945. Cr.    3-4

No credit after former HIS 1040. Selected topics in world history since 1945, including: impact of World War II on Europe and Euro­pean empires; bipolar division of the world between the United States and the Soviet Union; the international order and relations between the industrial nations (First World) and the developing nations (Third World).    (T)

1600    (HS) African Civilizations to 1800. Cr.    3-4

No credit after former HIS 2400. Africa from ancient Egypt to the Atlantic slave trade. Emphasis on state-building; regional and inter­national commercial networks and their role in economic, political, and socio-cultural change.    (T)

1610    (HS) African Civilizations Since 1800. Cr.    3-4

No credit after former HIS 2410. The origins of contemporary Africa, nineteenth century state-building, spread of Islamic religion, estab­lishment of European empires, independence struggles, and prob­lems of independence.    (T)

1710    (HS) History of Modern East Asia. (ASN 1710) Cr.    3

From beginning of nineteenth century to the present; emphasis on political, social and economic developments in China, Japan and Korea.    (I)

1800    (N E 2030) (HS) The Age of Islamic Empires: 600-1600. Cr.    3

Historical evolution of the Islamic world from birth of Islam to height of Ottoman Empire. Islamic history and civilization in a world-histori­cal context; developments indigenous to specific regions, such as Islamic Spain.    (Y)

1810    (N E 2040) (HS) The Modern Middle East. Cr.    3

Survey of Middle East history in modern era, focusing on the nine­teenth and twentieth centuries. Ottoman history from 1600: impact of European imperialism and nationalist movements, resulting in devel­opment of modern state systems, regional/national conflicts, and Islamic response to modernization.    (Y)

1900    (HS) History of Colonial Latin America. (LAS 1900) Cr.    3

The Spanish and Portuguese conquests in the Americas; the multi-racial and class social structures they established as colonies, and the movements for independence, 1492-1822.    (F)

1910    (HS) Latin America from Independence to the Present. (LAS 1910) Cr.    3

Latin America from early nineteenth century to the 1980s. Major themes include: 1) colonial pasts and political independence; 2) state formation, and the construction of identities at local and national lev­els; 3) elite and popular relations, including cases of rebellion, revolu­tion, and state repression; 4) forms of capitalist development and transformations in class relations, ideologies of economic develop­ment, and linkages to the United States.    (Y)

1995    (HS) Society and the Economic Transition. Cr.    3

Historical survey of the interaction between technological change, socio-economic systems, and culture. Multi-disciplinary studies of hunting, agrarian, and industrial societies.    (F)

2000    (U S 2000) (SS) Introduction to Urban Studies. (GPH 2000) (P S 2000) (SOC 2500) Cr.    4

Urban phenomena, past and present, quality and nature of urban life, major concerns of urban areas; perspectives and techniques of vari­ous urban-related disciplines.    (T)

2440    (LAS 2410) (FC) History of Mexico. Cr.    3

Historical development of Mexico and the Mexican people from the Spanish conquest to the present. Interaction of political, social, eco­nomic and cultural influences.    (F)

2605    (HS) History of Women, Gender and Sexuality in the Modern World. (GSW 2600) Cr.    3

Examination of change over time, using different historical approaches to try to account for change as specifically applicable from a comparative perspective to the experiences of women and constructions of gender and sexual identity.    (F)

2700    (P S 2700) (FC) Introduction to Canadian Studies. (ENG 2670) (GPH 2700) Cr.    3

Survey of Canada in its cultural, literary, historical, geographical and political aspects; key concepts and social patterns that define the Canadian experience.    (Y)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in History. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing, satisfactory completion of the IC require­ment; coreq: HIS 5996. Offered for S and U grades only. Open only to majors. Required for all majors. Students write term paper of approximately twenty typed pages, including footnotes and anno­tated bibliography. Must be selected in conjunction with the Capstone Course for Majors. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (F,W)

Honors (HON)

1000    (SS) The City. Cr.    0-3

Prereq: freshman Honors standing. First half of the Honors freshman first-year experience. Urban phenomena, past and present; quality and nature of urban areas; critical approaches to urban issues.    (F)

4200    (PL) Seminar in Philosophy and Letters. Cr.    3 (Max. 9)

Prereq: junior or senior standing; minimum 3.3 cumulative g.p.a. Analysis of meanings given to human experience through study of philosophy or letters. Honors variant of an approved PL course in General Education Program.    (Y)

4220    (LS) Seminar in Life Science. Cr.    3

Prereq: junior or senior standing; minimum 3.3 cumulative g.p.a. Analysis of aspects, methods, and important issues in various areas of the life sciences. Honors variant of an approved LS course in Gen­eral Education Program.    (Y)

4230    (PS) Seminar in Physical Science. Cr.    3

Prereq: junior or senior standing; minimum 3.3 cumulative g.p.a. Analysis of modern theory and data, implications and possibilities in the physical sciences. Honors variant of an approved PS course in the General Education Program.    (Y)

4240    (VP) Seminar in Visual and Performing Arts. (A H 4240) Cr.    3 (Max. 9)

Prereq: junior or senior standing; minimum 3.3 cumulative g.p.a. Analysis of ways the visual or performing arts may be appreciated, evaluated, and criticized. Honors variant of an approved VP course in the General Education Program.    (Y)

4250    (HS) Seminar in Historical Studies. Cr.    3 (Max. 9)

Prereq: junior or senior standing; minimum 3.3 cumulative g.p.a. Studies of periods of history in which there has been major transition or change. Honors variant of an approved HS course in General Edu­cation Program.    (Y)

4260    (FC) Seminar in Foreign Culture. Cr.    3 (Max. 9)

Prereq: junior or senior standing; minimum 3.3 cumulative g.p.a. Humanistic or social science investigation of peoples and institutions in other cultures. Honors variant of an approved FC course in Gen­eral Education Program.    (Y)

Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering (I E)

4310    (WI) Production Control. Cr.    3

Prereq: ENG 3050. Open only to students enrolled in professional engineering programs. The design of production planning and control systems. Materials management, forecasting, planning, scheduling of production systems, the planning and scheduling for large scale projects and introduction to the design of computerized materials management systems. Applications of operations research models to production control problems.    (W)

Italian (ITA)

2010    (FC) Intermediate Italian I. Cr.    4

Prereq: ITA 1020 or placement. Grammar review, composition, con­versation, reading, discussion of contemporary Italian culture. Mate­rial Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

2700    (GER 2700) (PL) Anguish and Commitment: European Existentialist Literature. (FRE 2700) (RUS 2700) (SPA 2700) Cr.    3-4

Only students in Honors Program may register for four credits. A team-taught interdisciplinary study in English of representative works by European existentialist writers: Dostoevsky, Hesse, Kafka, Piran­dello, Sartre, Camus, and Unamuno.    (B)

2710    (FC) Italian Culture and Civilization I. Cr.    3

Overview of development of Italian culture and civilization from their origins to 1500; emphasis on those aspects that prepared the politi­cal, social, cultural and intellectual groundwork of Humanism and the Renaissance. Taught in English.    (Y)

2720    (FC) Italian Culture and Civilization II. Cr.    3

Prereq: ITA 2710 recommended. Overview of Italian culture and civi­lization from 1500 to 1947: the Renaissance, Italian contributions to science, Unification of Italy, the Fascist era, the new republic. Taught in English.    (Y)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Italian. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing, consent of instructor; coreq: any 3000- or 6000-level Italian literature course. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disciplinary writing assign­ments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with designated corequisite; see section listing in Sched­ule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the Uni­versity General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (F,W)

Japanese (JPN)

2010    (FC) Intermediate Japanese I. Cr.    4

Prereq: JPN 1020, placement or consent of instructor. Continuation of JPN 1020. Focus on language and Japanese culture. Material Fee as given in Schedule of Classes.    (T)

4550    (FC) Japanese Culture and Society I. Cr.    4

Prereq: acceptance in Japanese Center for Michigan Universities Program. Open only to JCMU Program participants. Examination of significant social institutions and cultural aspects of modern Japa­nese society, including their historical development.    (F)

4560    (FC) Japanese Culture and Society II. Cr.    4

Prereq: acceptance in Japanese Center for Michigan Universities Program. Open only to JCMU Program participants. Significant social institutions and cultural aspects of modern Japanese society, includ­ing their historical development.    (W)

Kinesiology (KIN)

3550    (WI) Motor Learning and Control. Cr.    3

Study of motor skill acquisition and motor control with applications to physical activity. Focus on cognitive processes and neural mecha­nisms which contribute to motor learning and control. Satisfies Gen­eral Education program Writing Intensive requirement for kinesiology majors.    (I)

Labor Studies (LBS)

4700    (WI) Senior Seminar. Cr.    3 (Max. 6)

Prereq: consent of instructor. Research, reflection, discussion and analysis of labor relations practice.    (Y)

Latin (LAT)

2010    (FC) Intermediate Latin. Cr.    4

Prereq: LAT 1020. Review of Latin grammar, and readings from selected Roman prose authors such as Cicero and Caesar. Material Fee as given in Schedule of Classes.    (F)

Latino/a and Latin American Studies (LAS)

1900    (HIS 1900) (HS) History of Colonial Latin America. Cr.    3

The Spanish and Portuguese conquests in the Americas; the multi-racial, class and social structures they established as colonies, and the movements for independence, 1492-1822.    (F)

1910    (HIS 1910) (HS) Latin America from Independence to the Present. Cr.    3

Latin America from early nineteenth century to the 1980s.    (Y)

2410    (FC) History of Mexico. (HIS 2440) Cr.    3

Historical development of Mexico and the Mexican people from the Spanish conquest to the present. Interaction of political, social, eco­nomic and cultural influences.    (Y)

2420    (FC) History of Puerto Rico and Cuba. Cr.    3

Historical development of Puerto Rico and Cuba from the pre-Colum­bian period to the present. Interaction of political, social, economic and cultural influences.    (I)

3610    (SS) Seminar in Latino/a Urban Problems. Cr.    3

Historical and current issues in economics, politics, and culture involving the multi-racial and multi-ethnic Latino/a population of the United States.    (I)

Linguistics (LIN)

2720    (ENG 2720) (PL) Basic Concepts in Linguistics. Cr.    3

Analysis of the structure and use of language, focusing on English, from the standpoint of current linguistic practice. Topics include: pho­netics and sound structure, word structure, syntax, semantics, lan­guage origin and history, dialects, language learning and animal communication, and language in social interaction.    (Y)

2730    (ENG 2730) (FC) Languages of the World. Cr.    3

Survey of structure of major language families of the world, western and non-western; interrelationships of language and culture; univer­sals and variations of universals in language and culture.    (Y)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Linguistics. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing and satisfactory completion of the General Education IC requirement; coreq: student should register for this course in conjunction with one of: LIN 5210, 5320, 5750, 5760, 5770, 6720, or any linguistics course at the 5000-level or above that requires a term paper. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a corequisite course; see section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement. Inten­sive training in literature search, linguistic analysis, and the prepara­tion of scholarly written work.    (T)

Mathematics (MAT)

1000    (MC) Mathematics in Today's World. Cr.    0-3

Prereq: MAT 0900 at WSU with CNC or higher within past 12 months, OR MAT 0993 at WSU with CNC or higher within past twelve months, OR satisfactory score on Mathematics Placement Exam within past 12 months, OR an ACT Mathematics score of 18 or higher, validated by the University's testing office. Applications of mathematics to issues of current interest including patterns, para­doxes, limitations, and possibilities in voting, apportionment and divi­sion processes, using sampling methods, and developing information to support decisions.    (T)

1050    (MC) Algebra With Trigonometry. Cr.    5 or 7

Prereq: one of following within previous year: satisfactory score on WSU mathematics placement exam; or at least C-minus in MAT 1050 taken at WSU; or grade of CNC or above in MAT 0995 taken at WSU; or validated ACT Math score of 26 or above. Offered only as computer-based instruction. If Main Campus section is elected, stu­dent must complete minimum of three hours per week in Math Com­puter Lab in addition to the two-hour regular class meeting (hours: M - Th 8:30a -8:30p; Fri 8:30a - 4:00p; Sat 10:00a - 2:00p).. Algebra: properties of the real number system, equations and inequalities, lines, graphs, introduction to functions, exponents, logarithms. Geometry and trigonometry: basic concepts, introduction to trigono­metric functions, solving right triangles.    (T)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Mathematics. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing, satisfactory completion of the IC require­ment, consent of instructor, MAT 2030 and 2250; coreq: MAT 5420 or 6170. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a course des­ignated as a corequisite. See section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing-Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

Mechanical Engineering (M E)

4500    (WI) Mechanical Engineering Design II. (M E 5500) Cr.    4

Prereq: M E 4250, ENG 3060, B E 2550. Open only to students enrolled in professional engineering programs. (Note: M E 4300 and M E 4500 cannot be taken concurrently.) Students work in teams on a semester-long open-ended design project in which elements and subsystems are synthesized into larger systems. Formal written report required at the end of the project. Where applicable, hardware will be fabricated and tested. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (F,W)

5500    (M E 4500) (WI) Advanced Engineering Design. Cr.    4

Prereq: B E 2550, M E 4250, ENG 3060. Open only to AGRADE stu­dents. Team work on semester-long project, design concepts to be developed using various design theories, students perform patent lit­erature search, design, fabricate and test prototypes. Final written report and public presentation required. Satisfies Writing Intensive course requirement. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (F,W)

Mortuary Science (M S)

5996    (WI) Professional Review. Cr.    2

Open only to students in Bachelor of Science in Mortuary Science program. A comprehensive review and assessment in preparation for the National Board Examination consisting of assigned questions and in-class discussion and assessment, culminating in the Practice National Board Examination. Students receive a grade of Y at the conclusion of the course and have 60 days to take the National Board Examination after completion of the Mortuary Science profes­sional coursework.    (S)

Music History (MUH)

1340    (VP) Music Appreciation: World Music. Cr.    3

Open only to non-music majors. Introduction to the musical styles of Africa, Asia, South America, and the Middle East.    (T)

1345    (VP) Music Cultures. Cr.    3

Open only to B.A. music majors and B.Mus. majors; not open to stu­dents who have completed MUH 1340. Indigenous musics and cul­tures of Asia, Africa and the Americas; emphasis on features of the musics that have influenced Western art musics.    (W)

1350    (VP) History of American Popular Music. Cr.    3

History of American popular music from the early nineteenth century to the present. Political, economic, social, and cultural influences on music.    (W)

1351    (VP) History and Styles of Rock and Roll. Cr.    3

Exploration of American "mainstream" and "subcultural" popular music; focus on art, technology, business, cultural contexts.    (Y)

1370    (VP) Music Appreciation: Beginnings to the Present. Cr.    3

Survey of Western music from its beginnings to the present. Devel­oping musical understanding and critical listening skills by focusing on major composers and styles, and by concentrating on social, polit­ical and cultural influences.    (T)

3330    (WI) Music History and Literature III. Cr.    3

Prereq: MUH 3320 or equiv. Survey of important developments in western music history from 1900 to the present time. Concentration on major composers and styles, as well as on significant historical, philosophical, artistic and cultural influences.    (F)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Music. Cr.    0

Prereq: MUT 2160; junior standing, satisfactory completion of the IC requirement, written consent of instructor. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for majors. Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (F.W)

Near Eastern Studies (N E)

2000    (FC) Introduction to Islamic Civilization of the Near East. Cr.    3

The origin of Islam; growth of Islamic thought and institutions; Islamic revival and reform in modern times.    (Y)

2030    (HS) The Age of Islamic Empires: 600-1600. (HIS 1800) Cr.    3

Historical evolution of the Islamic world from birth of Islam to height of Ottoman Empire. Islamic history and civilization in a world-histori­cal context; developments indigenous to specific regions, such as Islamic Spain.    (Y)

2040    (HS) The Modern Middle East. (HIS 1810) Cr.    3

Survey of Middle East history in modern era, focusing on the nine­teenth and twentieth centuries. Ottoman history from 1600: impact of European imperialism and nationalist movements, resulting in devel­opment of modern state systems, regional/national conflicts, Islamic response to modernization.    (Y)

2060    (VP) Hebrew/Israeli Film: Trends and Themes in Israeli Cinema. Cr.    3

Evolution of Hebrew/Israeli cinema from the beginning of the twenti­eth century to the present. Collectivism to individual concerns. From Yaakov Ben-Dov to Joseph Cedar. Course taught in English; films have English subtitles.    (F)

3225    (FC) Modern Israeli Culture: A Pluralistic Perspective. Cr.    3

Minorities in Israel; the Kibbutz; women in public life; the Arab in Israeli literature; the press; education; technology; archaeology; music and dance. Taught in English.    (W)

3240    (N E 3240) (PL) Survey of Modern Hebrew Literature in English Translation. (HEB 3240) Cr.    3

Modern Hebrew literature from the end of the nineteenth century to the present; includes major authors from the European, pre-state and Israeli periods. Texts are in English translation. The texts in Hebrew are also available    (F)

3550    (ANT 3550) (FC) Arab Society in Transition. Cr.    3

Distinctive social and cultural institutions and processes of change in the Arab Middle East. Regional variations; background and discus­sion of current political and economic systems and their relations to international systems.    (I)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Near Eastern and Asian Studies. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing, satisfactory completion of the IC require­ment, consent of instructor; coreq: any 3000-level or higher course in the department. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a designated corequisite; see section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

Nursing (NUR)

4800    (FC) Transcultural Health Through the Life Cycle. Cr.    3

Prereq: junior standing; completion of sixty credits. Transcultural health differences and similarities in selected Western and non-Western cultures, from birth through old age. Use of theories and research methods from the health and social sciences and human­ities in study and analysis of different cultures.    (F,S)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Nursing. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing; satisfaction of IC requirement (ENG 3010 recommended); satisfactory completion of all NUR 2000-level courses: NUR 2010, NUR 2030, NUR 2060, NUR 2995, and NUR 2050; coreq: NUR 3010, NUR 3015, NUR 3020, NUR 4010, NUR 4020, NUR 4040, NUR 4050, or NUR 4120; written consent of advi­sor. Offered for undergraduate credit only. Successful completion of a written paper in a focus area of nursing. Must be selected in con­junction with course designated as corequisite; see section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

Nutrition and Food Science (NFS)

2030    (LS) Nutrition and Health. Cr.    3

Meets General Education Laboratory Requirement only when taken concurrently with coreq: NFS 2220. Food as a carrier of nutrients; food availability; nutrient utilization including digestion, metabolism and excretion. Patterns of food consumption based on biological, psychological and social needs; and anthropological findings.    (T)

4210    (WI) Dietetic Practice II. Cr.    10

Prereq: NFS 4230, NFS 5250; coreq: NFS 5200. Open only to stu­dents in coordinated dietetics program. Supervised practice in spe­cialty and critical care areas and in community settings; experiences in developing, implementing, evaluating and documenting care plans for individuals needing specialized nutrition support and nutrition education programs for health promotion and for high risk groups. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (F)

6850    (WI) Controversial Issues. Cr.    2

Prereq: NFS 4230; consent of instructor; senior standing. Open only to Nutrition and Food Science majors. Topics to be announced in Schedule of Classes.    (F)

Occupational Therapy (O T)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Seminar in Occupational Therapy. Cr.    0

Prereq: enrollment in occupational therapy program; coreq: O T 3000. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with designated corequisite; consult Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

Pharmacy Practice (PPR)

6180    (WI) Advanced Ethics and Professional Responsibility. Cr.    2

Prereq: third professional year standing and admission to Pharm.D. program. Advanced concepts in health care provision. Students required to submit a written paper, manuscript length and style, on an ethics in pharmacy project conducted as a course requirement. Sat­isfies the Writing Intensive requirement for Pharm.D. students.    (F)

Philosophy (PHI)

1010    (PL) Introduction to Philosophy. Cr.    0-4 (LCT: 3; or LCT: 3; DSC: 1)

Survey of some major questions that have occupied philosophers throughout history, such as Does God exist? What is a good person? Do we have free will? Is the mind the same as the brain? What can we really know? Course will acquaint students with major figures both historical and contemporary.    (T)

1020    (PL) Honors Introduction to Philosophy. Cr.    3-4

Open only to Honors students. Survey of some major questions that have occupied philosophers throughout history, such as Does God exist? What is a good person? Do we have free will? What can we really know? Course will acquaint students with major figures both historical and contemporary.    (I)

1050    (CT) Critical Thinking. Cr.    3

Knowledge and skills relevant to the critical evaluation of claims and arguments. Topics will include: the formulation and identification of deductively and inductively warranted conclusions from available evi­dence; the assessment of the strengths of arguments; the assess­ment of consistency, inconsistency, implications, and equivalence among statements; the identification of fallacious patterns of infer­ence; and the recognition of explanatory relations among statements.    (T)

1100    (PL) Contemporary Moral Issues. Cr.    3 (Max. 9)

Critical discussion of contemporary moral issues including pornogra­phy, adultery, same-sex marriage, abortion, preferential treatment, obligations to the poor, capital punishment, terrorism, and others.    (Y)

1110    (PL) Ethical Issues in Health Care. Cr.    3

Survey of moral issues that arise in the practice of medicine and in pursuit of medical knowledge: abortion, euthanasia, experimentation on human subjects, informed consent, rights to health care, genetic engineering, the concepts of death, health and disease.    (Y)

1120    (PL) Professional Ethics. Cr.    3

No credit after PHI 1110. Critical examination of moral issues in the workplace, including: discrimination and preferential treatment, sex­ual harassment, whistle-blowing, privacy and disclosure, corporate social responsibility.    (Y)

1130    (PL) Environmental Ethics. Cr.    3

Is the natural world something to be valued in itself, or is its value exhausted by the uses human beings derive from it? This course introduces students to some of the major views on the subject, anthropocentric (human-centered) and non-anthropocentric.    (Y)

1200    (PL) Life and Death. Cr.    3

Central philosophical and religious questions about life and death, and the enterprise of answering these questions through reasoning and argument. What is it to be alive, and to die? Do we cease to exist when we die, or might we continue to exist in an afterlife following our deaths? Should we fear or regret the fact that we will die someday, or should we be indifferent to it? Why is killing wrong? Is it always wrong to prevent a life from beginning, or to help someone bring his or her own life to an end? What, if anything, makes a life meaningful? We will study the ways in which these questions are raised and answered in a selection of classic and contemporary works of philos­ophy and literature.    (Y)

2100    (PL) Ancient Philosophy. Cr.    3

Introduction to the Western philosophical tradition from its origins in Ancient Greece. Readings from the pre-Socratics, Plato, and Aristo­tle.    (B)

2110    (PL) Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Philosophy. Cr.    3

A survey of the views concerning knowledge and reality of the major European philosophers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries such as Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant.    (B)

2150    (FC) Chinese Philosophy. (ASN 2150) Cr.    3

Main philosophical traditions from ancient to pre-Communist China. Readings from Confucianism. Taoism, Mohism, Legalism, Buddhism, Neo-Confucianism, and the Chinese Enlightenment. Main philosoph­ical traditions from ancient to pre-Communist China. Readings from Confucianism. Taoism, Mohism, Legalism, Buddhism, Neo-Confu­cianism, and the Chinese Enlightenment.    (W)

2320    (PL) Introduction to Ethics. Cr.    3

An introduction to some classical and modern views concerning such questions as: What determines the rightness and wrongness of actions? What is the nature of moral reasoning? What constitutes a moral life?    (T)

2400    (PL) Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion. Cr.    3

Religious beliefs provide subject matter for philosophical study; for example, Are the traditional arguments for the existence of God cred­ible? Does the existence of evil conflict with a belief in God's omnipo­tence and omnibenevolence? What is the value of religious experience?    (I)

2550    (PL) Introduction to Philosophy of Science. Cr.    3

Distinguishing science from non-science; how scientific knowledge is established; what constitutes scientific progress; whether science is cumulative; the place of science in the enterprise of knowledge and rational belief.    (B)

3500    (PL) Theory of Knowledge. Cr.    3

The distinction between knowledge and belief is germane to every field of inquiry. What is the difference between knowledge and belief? Do we know anything at all? If so, how? Are we ever in a position of being certain about beliefs pertaining to an objective world? Is our belief in an objective world based on our subjective experiences?    (T)

3550    (PL) Metaphysics. Cr.    3

Survey and examination of some of the enduring questions of meta­physics concerning the nature of reality. Topics include: the nature of physical objects, abstract entities, the concepts of time and change, the relation between mind and body, causation, the nature of meta­physics.    (Y)

3700    (PL) Philosophy of Art. Cr.    3

What are art works? Why are they so moving? What is the nature of the experience they offer? This course introduces the student to some of the schools of thought on these issues. It also attempts to deal with the specific natures of the various artistic media, such as: drama, literature, film, painting, photography, music and opera.    (T)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Philosophy. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing; satisfactory completion of the IC require­ment; consent of instructor and departmental undergraduate advisor; coreq: any philosophy course at the 3000 level or above except PHI 5050, 5200, 5350, and 5390. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disciplinary writing assign­ments under direction of faculty member. Must be selected in con­junction with a course designated as a corequisite; see section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement. Directed practice in rewriting assignments for the concurrently-elected course, for the purpose of perfecting skills in philosophical writing. Does not count toward the course minimums for the major or minor.    (T)

 

Physics (PHY)

1020    (PS) Conceptual Physics: The Basic Science. Cr.    3-4

Meets General Education Laboratory Requirement when elected for 4 credits (fee applies). Physical concepts and practical applications to everyday life of the basic principles of motion, forces, energy, mat­ter, heat, sound, electricity, magnetism, and light. Lectures, demon­strations and optional laboratory; laboratory is strongly recommended. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

1040    (PS) Einstein, Relativity and Quanta: A Conceptual Intro­duction. Cr.    3-4

Offered for four credits only to Honors students. Einstein and the ori­gin of the special theory of relativity; the curvature of space; the uncertainty principle; the quantum theory; the interaction of observer and measurement; fission and fusion; the influence of modern physi­cal theories on society and philosophy. Honors students have one additional hour per week of recitation and are required to write a major paper.    (W)

1070    (PS) Energy and the Environment. Cr.    3-4

Prereq: high school algebra. Meets General Education Laboratory requirement when elected for four credits. Introduction to energy pro­duction and usage, and environmental impact. Topics include: fossil fuel, electrical energy, nuclear power, solar power, wind energy, hydrogen power. Lectures, demonstrations, and optional laboratory. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (I)

2130    (PS) General Physics. Cr.    4

Prereq: high school algebra and trigonometry; coreq: PHY 2131. Sat­isfies General Education laboratory requirement only when taken concurrently with PHY 2131. No credit after PHY 2170. For general Liberal Arts and Sciences students and for students preparing for medicine, dentistry, pharmacy and health sciences. Mechanics, ther­mal physics, wave motions, and optics.    (T)

2170    (PS) University Physics for Scientists I. Cr.    4

Prereq: MAT 2010; coreq: MAT 2020, PHY 2171. Satisfies General Education laboratory requirement only when taken concurrently with PHY 2171. No credit after PHY 2175. For students specializing in physics, biology, chemistry, mathematics or engineering. Statics, kinematics, dynamics, energy and linear momentum, rotational kine­matics and dynamics, angular momentum, solids and fluids, vibra­tions and wave motion, thermodynamics.    (T)

2175    (PS) University Physics for Engineers I. Cr.    4

Prereq: MAT 2010; coreq: MAT 2020. Open only to College of Engi­neering students; others by written consent of instructor. No credit after PHY 2170. For students specializing in engineering. Statics, kinematics, dynamics, energy and linear momentum, rotational kine­matics and dynamics, angular momentum, solids and fluids, vibra­tions and wave motion, thermodynamics.    (T)

3100    (PS) The Sounds of Music. Cr.    4

Prereq: sophomore standing. Meets General Education Laboratory Requirement. For music majors and other students interested in the physical foundations of the production, perception, and reproduction of musical sounds. Makes only limited use of simple mathematics. Includes topics such as wave properties, loudness levels and the human ear, hearing loss, tone quality, frequency and pitch, musical intervals and tuning, room acoustics, the production of sound by var­ious musical instruments, and electronic reproduction of music. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (F)

6780    (WI) Research Methods in Biomedical Physics. Cr.    3

Prereq: PHY 3700, PHY 4700. Introduction to laboratory experience in biomedical physics research. Material fee as given in Schedule of Classes.    (W)

6850    (WI) Modern Physics Laboratory. Cr.    2

Prereq: PHY 3300 or consent of instructor. Techniques and experi­ments in physics of atoms, atomic nuclei, molecules, the solid state and other areas that have advanced our modern understanding of physics. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (W)

Polish (POL)

2010    (FC) Intermediate Polish. Cr.    4

Prereq: POL 1020 or equiv. Further development of Polish language and cultural proficiency through listening, reading, speaking and writ­ing activities, and examination of Polish culture. Completion of this course fulfills the General Education requirement for foreign lan­guage and culture. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (F)

2710    (FC) Survey of Polish Culture. Cr.    3

Introductory cultural survey from beginnings of Polish state to pres­ent. Polish society and cultural developments analyzed in compara­tive contexts.    (F,W)

3410    (SLA 3410) (FC) New Soil, Old Roots: The Immigrant Experience. (ARM 3410) (GER 3410) (RUS 3410) (UKR 3410) Cr.    3

Armenian, German, Jewish, Polish, Russian and Ukrainian immigra­tion to the United States, its effects on the cultures (language, litera­ture, religion, politics, music, art and theatre) of these ethnic groups and its influence upon American culture.    (F)

3750    (VP) Polish and Yugoslavian Cinema. (SLA 3750) Cr.    3

Two national cinemas introduced through milestone films and lesser-known cinematic gems produced before and after the fall of commu­nism.    (W)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Polish. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing, satisfactory completion of the IC require­ment, consent of instructor; coreq: any 3000-, 4000-, or 5000-level Polish literature or culture course. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disciplinary writing assign­ments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a designated corequisite; see section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (F,W)

Political Science (P S)

1000    (SS) Introduction to Political Science. Cr.    3

Introduction to the scope and method of political science. Overview of politics, political systems, nature and role of political institutions. Empirical political theory; practice in conducting political research.    (Y)

1010    (AI) American Government. Cr.    4

No credit after P S 1030. Politics and functions of American govern­mental institutions. Policy processes and the role of citizens in the political process.    (T)

1030    (AI) The American Governmental System. Cr.    3

No credit after P S 1010. Structure and functions of the American political system. Governmental institutions and processes.    (T)

2000    (U S 2000) (SS) Introduction to Urban Studies. (GPH 2000) (HIS 2000) (SOC 2500) Cr.    4

Urban phenomena, past and present; quality and nature of urban life; major concerns of urban areas; perspectives and techniques of vari­ous urban-related disciplines.    (Y)

2240    (SS) Introduction to Urban Politics and Policy. Cr.    4

Influences on politics and problems of cities, forms of local political involvement, role of local public officials, impact of state and federal policies. Overview of current issues and problems in specific policy areas.    (Y)

2700    (FC) Introduction to Canadian Studies. (ENG 2670) (GPH 2700) (HIS 2700) Cr.    3

Survey of Canada in its cultural, literary, historical, geographical and political aspects; key concepts and social patterns that define the Canadian experience.    (Y)

3510    (PL) Law, Authority and Rebellion. Cr.    4

Analysis of major theories of law, authority, freedom, and political obligation; justifications of disobedience, resistance and revolution.    (B)

3520    (PL) Justice. Cr.    4

Analysis of major theories of justice; social, economic and political justice.    (B)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Political Science. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing, satisfactory completion of the IC require­ment, consent of instructor; coreq: any P S course numbered 3000 or higher except P S 5630 and 6640. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disciplinary writing assign­ments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a designated corequisite; see section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

 

Psychology (PSY)

1010    (LS) Introductory Psychology. Cr.    4

Meets General Education Laboratory Requirement. No credit after PSY 1020. Grade of C or better required for psychology majors. Introduction to the science of behavior. Principles, concepts, and the­ories of human thought and action. Selected concepts illustrated through laboratory experiments. Recommended for students intended to major in psychology.    (T)

1020    (LS) Elements of Psychology. Cr.    3

No credit after PSY 1010. Principles, theories and applications of psychological knowledge. Intended for non-psychology majors.    (T)

3993    (WI) Laboratory in Experimental Psychology. Cr.    2

Prereq: PSY 1010 or PSY 1030; PSY 3010, and completion of Gen­eral Education IC requirement; prereq or coreq: PSY 3040 or PSY 3060 or 3080. Grade of C or better required of psychology majors. Lab investigations of perceptual, sensory, learning, and cognitive processes. . Material fee as indicated in Schedule of Classes.    (S)

Radiation Technology (R T)

4360    (WI) Clinical Practicum V. Cr.    4

Prereq: R T 4350. Continued clinical practice under limited supervi­sion. Submission of essay on radiation oncology topic. Completion of clinical competency requirements. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (W)

Russian (RUS)

2010    (FC) Intermediate Russian I. Cr.    4

Prereq: RUS 1020 or equiv. Continuation of RUS 1020 with empha­sis on developing speaking and reading skills. Material Fee As Indi­cated In The Schedule of Classes    (F)

2700    (GER 2700) (PL) Anguish and Commitment: European Existentialist Literature. (FRE 2700) (ITA 2700) (SPA 2700) Cr.    3-4

Only students in Honors Program may register for four credits. A team-taught interdisciplinary study in English of representative works by European existentialist writers: Dostoevsky, Hesse, Kafka, Piran­dello, Sartre, Camus, and Unamuno.    (W)

2710    (FC) Introduction to Russian Culture. Cr.    3

Survey of Russian culture from the tenth century to the present day. Introduction to Russian history, art, architecture, literature, music, religious practices, intellectual thought, and cuisine, as well as vari­ous aspects of daily life from the Tsarist period to the present day.    (Y)

3410    (SLA 3410) (FC) New Soil, Old Roots: The Immigrant Experience. (ARM 3410) (GER 3410) (POL 3410) (UKR 3410) Cr.    3

Armenian, German, Jewish, Polish, Russian and Ukrainian immigra­tion to the United States, its effects on the cultures (language, litera­ture, religion, politics, music, art and theatre) of these ethnic groups and its influence upon American culture.    (F)

3600    (PL) Nineteenth Century Russian Literature. (RUS 5600) Cr.    3

Major Russian writers, including Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chek­hov, and others. How literature reflects and grows out of history; how culture is affected by writers and poets. Taught in English; readings in English.    (F)

3650    (PL) Russian Literature Since 1900. (RUS 5650) Cr.    3

Twentieth century Russian literature as it explores the universal questions of love, death, rebirth, spirituality, and despair against a background of war, revolution, political oppression and economic col­lapse. Close analysis of major works of prose and poetry as well as literary currents such as Russian modernism, Socialist Realism, and post-modernism. Taught in English; readings in English.    (B)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Russian. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing, satisfactory completion of the IC require­ment, consent of instructor; coreq: any 3000-, 4000-, or 5000-level Russian literature or culture course. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disciplinary writing assign­ments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a course designated as a corequisite; see section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (F,W)

Slavic (SLA)

2310    (GER 2310) (PL) Short Fiction from Central Europe and Russia. Cr.    3

Explores how writers use short fictional forms, such as parable, short story, fairy tale, and satire, to express important themes in the Cen­tral European experience, including violence and cruelty, freedom and imprisonment, utopian visions, and urban life.    (F)

3410    (FC) New Soil, Old Roots: The Immigrant Experience. (ARM 3410) (GER 3410) (POL 3410) (RUS 3410) (UKR 3410) Cr.    3

Armenian, German, Jewish, Polish, Russian and Ukrainian immigra­tion to the United States, its effects on the cultures (language, litera­ture, religion, politics, music, art and theatre) of these ethnic groups and its influence upon American culture.    (F)

3710    (VP) Russian and East European Film. Cr.    3-4

Major Russian, Polish, Czech, Ukrainian and Armenian films viewed and discussed from political, historical, cultural and aesthetic points of view.    (Y)

3750    (POL 3750) (VP) Polish and Yugoslavian Cinema. Cr.    3

Two national cinemas introduced through milestone films and lesser-known cinematic gems produced before and after the fall of commu­nism.    (W)

Social Work (S W)

4997    (WI) Integrative Seminar in Social Work. Cr.    3

Prereq: S W 4010; coreq: S W 4998, S W 4020. Integration of class­room learning and field experiences to promote student's under­standing of social work knowledge, skills and values. Assessment of knowledge and experiential bases for generalist social work practice. Satisfies General Education Writing Intensive requirement.    (F,W)

Sociology (SOC)

2000    (SS) Understanding Human Society. Cr.    3

Analysis of basic sociological concepts and principles to give the stu­dent an understanding of the perspective that sociology brings to the study of human society.    (T)

2020    (SS) Social Problems. Cr.    3

Consideration of major contemporary social problems which reveal structural strains, value conflicts, deviations and changes in society. Analysis of socio-cultural factors creating problems and of possible solutions.    (T)

2500    (U S 2000) (SS) Introduction to Urban Studies. (GPH 2000) (HIS 2000) (P S 2000) Cr.    4

Urban phenomena both past and present, including the quality and nature of urban life; major concerns of urban areas; perspectives and techniques of various urban related disciplines.    (Y)

3300    (SS) Social Inequality. Cr.    4

Structure and process in society, institutions, communities, and orga­nizations. Scientific analysis of organization, conflict, and change in the economy, government, religion, education, and family.    (Y)

3510    (SS) The Nature and Impact of Population on Society. Cr.    3

Birth, death and migration investigated with respect to their social causes and consequences for society and human behavior. The pop­ulation explosion and its implication for government policy. Recom­mended for students interested in urban studies, medicine, nursing, political science and history.    (B)

4100    (SS) Social Psychology. Cr.    4

An introduction to the major issues in social psychology. Topics such as socialization, social perception, self-conceptions and social defini­tions of selves and situations.    (T)

4996    (WI) Sociology: Capstone Course. Cr.    4

Open only to sociology majors. Prereq: written consent of depart­ment; SOC 2000, SOC 3300, SOC 4050, SOC 4200, and SOC 4220. Prereq. for Honors students: junior or senior standing; SOC 2000, 3300, 4050, 4200, 4220; sociology major with sociology h.p.a. of at least 3.3 and cumulative h.p.a. of at least 3.0; written consent of the­sis and Honors advisers. Students choose a specific researchable topic related to the discipline and explore possible theoretical approaches. In addition, students develop a research proposal related to a topic which will include research methodology.    (F,W)

Spanish (SPA)

2010    (FC) Intermediate Spanish I. Cr.    4

Prereq: SPA 1020 or placement. Continuing study of the Spanish lan­guage and Hispanic culture through interactive and communicative reading, writing, listening and speaking activities to develop lan­guage and cultural proficiency. Completion of this course fulfills the Gereral Education requirement for foreign language and culture. Material Fee as indicated in the Schedule of Classes.    (T)

2700    (GER 2700) (PL) Anguish and Commitment: European Existentialist Literature. (FRE 2700) (ITA 2700) (RUS 2700) Cr.    3-4

Only students in Honors Program may register for four credits. A team-taught interdisciplinary study in English of representative works by European existentialist writers: Dostoevsky, Hesse, Kafka, Piran­dello, Sartre, Camus, and Unamuno.    (B)

5100    (WI) Advanced Composition. Cr.    3

Prereq: SPA 3100 or placement. Study and utilization of Spanish in written form: colloquial usage, literary Spanish, commercial Spanish, idiomatic expressions. Brief compositions and translation exercises. Conducted entirely in Spanish.    (Y)

Speech-Language Pathology (SLP)

5360    (WI) Clinical Practice in Speech-Language Pathology. Cr.    3 (Max. 9)

Prereq: SLP 6460, 6480, and 5310, each with grade of B or better; written consent of department. Supervised experience in application of methods of diagnosis and treatment of clinical cases. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

Swahili (SWA)

2010    (FC) Intermediate Swahili. Cr.    4

Prereq: SWA 1020 or consent of instructor. Conversational Swahili and grammar review; reading of Swahili literature. Continuation of SWA 1020. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (S)

Teacher Education (TED)

5150    (WI) Analysis of Elementary Teaching. Cr.    3 or 6

Prereq: admission to College of Education. Mandatory orientation is held prior to beginning of each semester; refer to Schedule of Classes for date, time and location. Organization and management of classrooms. Lesson planning, teaching strategies and testing pro­cedures. Work in classroom assigned by both an experienced public school teacher and a University faculty member. Material Fee as stated in Schedule of Classes.    (F,W)

5160    (WI) Analysis of Middle and Secondary School Teaching. Cr.    3

Prereq: admission to College of Education; coreq: TED 5650. Man­datory orientation is held prior to beginning of each semester; refer to Schedule of Classes for date, time and location. Overview of struc­ture, function and purposes of middle and secondary school educa­tion. Development and analysis of instructional objectives. Organization and management of classrooms. Teaching strategies and assessment of learning. Exploration and utilization of resources in the community.    (F)

Theatre (THR)

1010    (VP) Introduction to the Theatre. Cr.    3

No credit after THR 1111. Historical, critical and cultural aspects of theatre and drama discussed relative to play attendance.    (T)

1030    (VP) Introduction to Black Theatre and Performance. Cr.    3

Origins, development, and current trends with production techniques and problems related to the special area of the drama. Material fee as given in Schedule of Classes.    (T)

1041    (VP) Musical Theatre Appreciation. Cr.    3

Survey of American musical theatre from its multiple historical origins to the present. Development of musical theatre understanding and critical observational skills through focus on the ways in which the genre has emerged through interactions between musical theatre artists and their audiences. (Formerly THR 1200.) Material fee as given in Schedule of Classes.    (F,W)

5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Theatre. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior or senior standing, consent of instructor, satisfactory completion of the BC and IC requirements; coreq: THR 5120, or THR 6120 (or THR 5811 or THR 5812). Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Open only to upper division theatre majors. Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a desig­nated corequisite; see section listing in Schedule of Classes for core­quisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

 

Urban Studies (U S)

2000    (SS) Introduction to Urban Studies. (GPH 2000) (HIS 2000) (P S 2000) (SOC 2500) Cr.    4

Urban phenomena, past and present, quality and nature of urban life, major concerns of urban areas; perspectives and techniques of vari­ous urban-related disciplines.    (T)

4620    (WI) Urban Studies Senior Capstone Research. Cr.    2

Prereq: U S 4420 or GPH 6420 or CRJ 4860 or P S 3600 or SOC 4200 or consent of instructor. Development and application of research design to specified urban problems.    (Y)

Ukrainian (UKR)

2010    (FC) Intermediate Ukrainian. Cr.    4

Prereq: UKR 1020 or equiv. Study in-depth of structure and syntax based on reading. Oral and written practice. Material Fee As Indi­cated In The Schedule of Classes    (F)

3410    (SLA 3410) (FC) New Soil, Old Roots: The Immigrant Experience. (ARM 3410) (GER 3410) (POL 3410) (RUS 3410) Cr.    3

Armenian, German, Jewish, Polish, Russian and Ukrainian immigra­tion to the United States, its effects on the cultures (language, litera­ture, religion, politics, music, art and theatre) of these ethnic groups and its influence upon American culture.    (F)

Courses Sorted by General Education Category

American Society and Institutions (AI)

Basic Composition Competency (BC)

Critical and Analytic Thinking Competency (CT)

Foreign Culture (FC)

Historical Studies (HS)

Intermediate Composition Competency (IC)

Life Sciences (LS)

Mathematics Competency (MC)

Oral Communication Competency (OC)

Philosophy and Letters (PL)

Physical Sciences (PS)

Social Sciences (SS)

Visual and Performing Arts (VP)

Writing Intensive Competency (WI)

American Society and Institutions (AI)

HIS 1050    (AI) American Civilization Since World War II. Cr.    3-4

Recent American ideas, institutions, and social movements within the broad context of global change and conflicts.    (B)

P S 1010    (AI) American Government. Cr.    4

No credit after P S 1030. Politics and functions of American govern­mental institutions. Policy processes and the role of citizens in the political process.    (T)

P S 1030    (AI) The American Governmental System. Cr.    3

No credit after P S 1010. Structure and functions of the American political system. Governmental institutions and processes.    (T)

 

Basic Composition Competency (BC)

ENG 1020    (BC) Introductory College Writing. Cr.    3

Prereq: placement through ACT score, English Qualifying Examina­tion, or passing grade in ENG 1010. A course in reading, research, and writing skills that prepares students to write successfully in col­lege classes.    (T)

ENG 1050    (BC) Freshman Honors: Introductory College Writing. Cr.    3

Open only to Honors Program students. A course in reading, research and writing skills that prepares students to write success­fully in college classes.    (F)

 

Critical and Analytic Thinking Competency (CT)

B A 1010    (CT) Critical Thinking for Consumer Decisions. Cr.    3

Open only to students in Business Administration undergraduate degree programs or students in design and merchandising program. Development of critical thinking skills and the application of these skills in evaluation and decisions for a broad range of consumer issues including advertising interpretations, purchase decisions, job applications, and consumer protection.    (T)

COM 2110    (CT) Argumentation and Debate. Cr.    3

Prereq: COM 1010 or equiv. Logical and legal foundation of the argu­mentation process; practical experience in analysis, reasoning, case-building, evaluation of evidence, refutation and cross-examination.    (T)

PHI 1050    (CT) Critical Thinking. Cr.    3

Knowledge and skills relevant to the critical evaluation of claims and arguments. Topics will include: the formulation and identification of deductively and inductively warranted conclusions from available evi­dence; the assessment of the strengths of arguments; the assess­ment of consistency, inconsistency, implications, and equivalence among statements; the identification of fallacious patterns of infer­ence; and the recognition of explanatory relations among statements.    (T)

 

Foreign Culture (FC)

AFS 3250    (FC) Politics and Culture in Anglophone Caribbean. Cr.    3

Survey of political, economic and cultural life of the Caribbean. Rela­tionship of the Caribbean to U.S. and world political and cultural developments. Interdisciplinary approach: historical, comparative, thematic issues.    (Y)

AFS 3610    (FC) Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Foreign Cul­ture: The Africans. Cr.    4

Prereq: upper division standing. Humanistic aspects, history, socio-cultural institutions of African cultures; theory and methods, compar­ativist perspectives.    (Y)

ANT 3150    (FC) Anthropology of Business. Cr.    3-4

Differences between American culture/business practice and the cul­ture/business practice of other countries: assumptions, world view and family structure, organization and language.    (T)

ANT 3520    (FC) Understanding Africa: Past, Present and Future. Cr.    3

In-depth knowledge of Africa through the study of its physiography, prehistory and history, social institutions, and social changes within a global context.    (T)

ANT 3540    (FC) Cultures and Societies of Latin America. Cr.    3

Latin American social structures and cultural variation, history, and relationship to the United States. Themes include class, race, ethnic­ity, gender, religion, globalization, and immigration to the United States.    (I)

ANT 3550    (FC) Arab Society in Transition. (N E 3550) Cr.    3

Distinctive social and cultural institutions and processes of change in the Arab Middle East. Regional variations: background and discus­sion of current political and economic systems and their relationship to international systems.    (I)

ARB 2010    (FC) Intermediate Arabic I. Cr.    4

Prereq: ARB 1020 or consent of instructor. Continuation of grammar, readings in classical and modern prose. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (F)

ARM 3410    (SLA 3410) (FC) New Soil, Old Roots: The Immigrant Experience. (GER 3410) (POL 3410) (RUS 3410) (UKR 3410) Cr.    3

Armenian, German, Jewish, Polish, Russian and Ukrainian immigra­tion to the United States, its effects on the cultures (language, litera­ture, religion, politics, music, art and theatre) of these ethnic groups and its influence upon American culture.    (F)

ASN 2150    (PHI 2150) (FC) Chinese Philosophy. Cr.    3

Main philosophical traditions from ancient to pre-Communist China. Readings from Confucianism. Taoism, Mohism, Legalism, Buddhism, Neo-Confucianism, and the Chinese Enlightenment.    (W)

CHI 2010    (FC) Intermediate Chinese. Cr.    4

Prereq: CHI 1020 or consent of instructor. Completion of Chinese language sequence. Material fee as given in Schedule of Classes.    (Y)

DNC 2400    (FC) Introduction to African Dance. Cr.    3

Exploration of African and African derived dance forms, together with their integrated philosophy, music, art and theatre forms. Lectures, videos, concert attendance and reading assignments to learn and perform dances from selected African societies. Material Fee As Indi­cated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

ENG 2670    (P S 2700) (FC) Introduction to Canadian Studies. (GPH 2700) (HIS 2700) Cr.    3

Survey of Canada in its cultural, literary, historical, geographical and political aspects; key concepts and social patterns that define the Canadian experience.    (Y)

ENG 2730    (FC) Languages of the World. (LIN 2730) Cr.    3

Survey of structure of major language families of the world, western and non-western; interrelationships of language and culture; univer­sals and variations of universals in language and culture.    (Y)

FRE 2010    (FC) Intermediate French. Cr.    4

Prereq: FRE 1020 or placement. Continuing development of French language and Francophone cultural proficiency through interactive and communicative reading, writing, listening and speaking activities. Completion of this course fulfills the General education requirement for foreign language and culture. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

FRE 2710    (FC) Introduction to French Civilization I. Cr.    3

An overview of France's great contributions to world culture, from the time of the Gauls to the French Revolution. French history, thought, art, architecture, society, geography, and institutions; illustrated with slides and films; includes visits to Detroit Institute of Arts.    (T)

FRE 2720    (FC) Introduction to French Civilization II. Cr.    3

From the French Revolution to contemporary times. French way of life, its moral and intellectual foundations, its culture and institutions; their transformation under the stress of the twentieth century.    (B)

GER 2010    (FC) Intermediate German I. Cr.    4

Prereq: GER 1020 or placement. Continuation of GER 1020. Read­ing of graded German literature and grammar review. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

GER 2710    (FC) Survey of Germanic Culture I. Cr.    3

Development of Germanic people from their origin to 1835; their major contributions of cultural significance to the Western world.    (F)

GER 2720    (FC) Survey of Germanic Culture II. Cr.    3

Development of Germanic people from 1835 to the present; the Nazi period; and World War II.    (W)

GER 3410    (SLA 3410) (FC) New Soil, Old Roots: The Immigrant Experience. (ARM 3410) (POL 3410) (RUS 3410) (UKR 3410) Cr.    3

Armenian, German, Jewish, Polish, Russian and Ukrainian immigra­tion to the United States, its effects on the cultures (language, litera­ture, religion, politics, music, art and theatre) of these ethnic groups and its influence upon American life.    (F)

GKA 2010    (FC) Intermediate Ancient Greek I. Cr.    4

Prereq: GKA 1020. Review of Greek grammar, and readings from selected Greek prose authors such as Plato and Lysias. Material Fee as given in Schedule of Classes.    (F)

GKM 2010    (FC) Intermediate Modern Greek I. Cr.    4

Prereq: GKM 1020 or equiv. Review of grammar, practice in oral and written modern Greek, based on readings in modern Greek literature. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (F)

GKM 3710    (FC) Modern Greek Literature and Culture in English. Cr.    3-4

No knowledge of modern Greek required for this course; all readings in English translation; satisfies General Education requirement in Foreign Culture; does not satisfy foreign language requirement. Stu­dents wishing to take the Honors option should enroll for four credits. Survey of the culture and civilization of modern Greece through a study of modern Greek history, religion, and literary traditions.    (I)

GPH 2700    (P S 2700) (FC) Introduction to Canadian Studies. (ENG 2670) (HIS 2700) Cr.    3

Survey of Canada in its cultural, literary, historical, geographical and political aspects; key concepts and social patterns that define the Canadian experience.    (Y)

HEB 2010    (FC) Intermediate Hebrew I. Cr.    4

Prereq: HEB 1020 or consent of instructor. Reading of additional cul­tural texts. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (F)

HIS 2440    (LAS 2410) (FC) History of Mexico. Cr.    3

Historical development of Mexico and the Mexican people from the Spanish conquest to the present. Interaction of political, social, eco­nomic and cultural influences.    (F)

HIS 2700    (P S 2700) (FC) Introduction to Canadian Studies. (ENG 2670) (GPH 2700) Cr.    3

Survey of Canada in its cultural, literary, historical, geographical and political aspects; key concepts and social patterns that define the Canadian experience.    (Y)

HON 4260    (FC) Seminar in Foreign Culture. Cr.    3 (Max. 9)

Prereq: junior or senior standing; minimum 3.3 cumulative g.p.a. Humanistic or social science investigation of peoples and institutions in other cultures. Honors variant of an approved FC course in Gen­eral Education Program.    (Y)

ITA 2010    (FC) Intermediate Italian I. Cr.    4

Prereq: ITA 1020 or placement. Grammar review, composition, con­versation, reading, discussion of contemporary Italian culture. Mate­rial Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

ITA 2710    (FC) Italian Culture and Civilization I. Cr.    3

Overview of development of Italian culture and civilization from their origins to 1500; emphasis on those aspects that prepared the politi­cal, social, cultural and intellectual groundwork of Humanism and the Renaissance. Taught in English.    (Y)

ITA 2720    (FC) Italian Culture and Civilization II. Cr.    3

Prereq: ITA 2710 recommended. Overview of Italian culture and civi­lization from 1500 to 1947: the Renaissance, Italian contributions to science, Unification of Italy, the Fascist era, the new republic. Taught in English.    (Y)

JPN 2010    (FC) Intermediate Japanese I. Cr.    4

Prereq: JPN 1020, placement or consent of instructor. Continuation of JPN 1020. Focus on language and Japanese culture. Material Fee as given in Schedule of Classes.    (T)

JPN 4550    (FC) Japanese Culture and Society I. Cr.    4

Prereq: acceptance in Japanese Center for Michigan Universities Program. Open only to JCMU Program participants. Examination of significant social institutions and cultural aspects of modern Japa­nese society, including their historical development.    (F)

JPN 4560    (FC) Japanese Culture and Society II. Cr.    4

Prereq: acceptance in Japanese Center for Michigan Universities Program. Open only to JCMU Program participants. Significant social institutions and cultural aspects of modern Japanese society, includ­ing their historical development.    (W)

LAS 2410    (FC) History of Mexico. (HIS 2440) Cr.    3

Historical development of Mexico and the Mexican people from the Spanish conquest to the present. Interaction of political, social, eco­nomic and cultural influences.    (Y)

LAS 2420    (FC) History of Puerto Rico and Cuba. Cr.    3

Historical development of Puerto Rico and Cuba from the pre-Colum­bian period to the present. Interaction of political, social, economic and cultural influences.    (I)

LAT 2010    (FC) Intermediate Latin. Cr.    4

Prereq: LAT 1020. Review of Latin grammar, and readings from selected Roman prose authors such as Cicero and Caesar. Material Fee as given in Schedule of Classes.    (F)

LIN 2730    (ENG 2730) (FC) Languages of the World. Cr.    3

Survey of structure of major language families of the world, western and non-western; interrelationships of language and culture; univer­sals and variations of universals in language and culture.    (Y)

N E 2000    (FC) Introduction to Islamic Civilization of the Near East. Cr.    3

The origin of Islam; growth of Islamic thought and institutions; Islamic revival and reform in modern times.    (Y)

N E 3225    (FC) Modern Israeli Culture: A Pluralistic Perspective. Cr.    3

Minorities in Israel; the Kibbutz; women in public life; the Arab in Israeli literature; the press; education; technology; archaeology; music and dance. Taught in English.    (W)

N E 3550    (ANT 3550) (FC) Arab Society in Transition. Cr.    3

Distinctive social and cultural institutions and processes of change in the Arab Middle East. Regional variations; background and discus­sion of current political and economic systems and their relations to international systems.    (I)

NUR 4800    (FC) Transcultural Health Through the Life Cycle. Cr.    3

Prereq: junior standing; completion of sixty credits. Transcultural health differences and similarities in selected Western and non-Western cultures, from birth through old age. Use of theories and research methods from the health and social sciences and human­ities in study and analysis of different cultures.    (F,S)

P S 2700    (P S 2700) (FC) Introduction to Canadian Studies. (ENG 2670) (GPH 2700) (HIS 2700) Cr.    3

Survey of Canada in its cultural, literary, historical, geographical and political aspects; key concepts and social patterns that define the Canadian experience.    (Y)

PHI 2150    (FC) Chinese Philosophy. (ASN 2150) Cr.    3

Main philosophical traditions from ancient to pre-Communist China. Readings from Confucianism. Taoism, Mohism, Legalism, Buddhism, Neo-Confucianism, and the Chinese Enlightenment. Main philosoph­ical traditions from ancient to pre-Communist China. Readings from Confucianism. Taoism, Mohism, Legalism, Buddhism, Neo-Confu­cianism, and the Chinese Enlightenment.    (W)

POL 2010    (FC) Intermediate Polish. Cr.    4

Prereq: POL 1020 or equiv. Further development of Polish language and cultural proficiency through listening, reading, speaking and writ­ing activities, and examination of Polish culture. Completion of this course fulfills the General Education requirement for foreign lan­guage and culture. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (F)

POL 2710    (FC) Survey of Polish Culture. Cr.    3

Introductory cultural survey from beginnings of Polish state to pres­ent. Polish society and cultural developments analyzed in compara­tive contexts.    (F,W)

POL 3410    (SLA 3410) (FC) New Soil, Old Roots: The Immigrant Experience. (ARM 3410) (GER 3410) (RUS 3410) (UKR 3410) Cr.    3

Armenian, German, Jewish, Polish, Russian and Ukrainian immigra­tion to the United States, its effects on the cultures (language, litera­ture, religion, politics, music, art and theatre) of these ethnic groups and its influence upon American culture.    (F)

RUS 2010    (FC) Intermediate Russian I. Cr.    4

Prereq: RUS 1020 or equiv. Continuation of RUS 1020 with empha­sis on developing speaking and reading skills. Material Fee As Indi­cated In The Schedule of Classes    (F)

RUS 2710    (FC) Introduction to Russian Culture. Cr.    3

Survey of Russian culture from the tenth century to the present day. Introduction to Russian history, art, architecture, literature, music, religious practices, intellectual thought, and cuisine, as well as vari­ous aspects of daily life from the Tsarist period to the present day.    (Y)

RUS 3410    (SLA 3410) (FC) New Soil, Old Roots: The Immigrant Experience. (ARM 3410) (GER 3410) (POL 3410) (UKR 3410) Cr.    3

Armenian, German, Jewish, Polish, Russian and Ukrainian immigra­tion to the United States, its effects on the cultures (language, litera­ture, religion, politics, music, art and theatre) of these ethnic groups and its influence upon American culture.    (F)

SLA 3410    (SLA 3410) (FC) New Soil, Old Roots: The Immigrant Experience. (ARM 3410) (GER 3410) (POL 3410) (RUS 3410) (UKR 3410) Cr.    3

Armenian, German, Jewish, Polish, Russian and Ukrainian immigra­tion to the United States, its effects on the cultures (language, litera­ture, religion, politics, music, art and theatre) of these ethnic groups and its influence upon American culture.    (F)

SPA 2010    (FC) Intermediate Spanish I. Cr.    4

Prereq: SPA 1020 or placement. Continuing study of the Spanish lan­guage and Hispanic culture through interactive and communicative reading, writing, listening and speaking activities to develop lan­guage and cultural proficiency. Completion of this course fulfills the Gereral Education requirement for foreign language and culture. Material Fee as indicated in the Schedule of Classes.    (T)

SWA 2010    (FC) Intermediate Swahili. Cr.    4

Prereq: SWA 1020 or consent of instructor. Conversational Swahili and grammar review; reading of Swahili literature. Continuation of SWA 1020. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (S)

UKR 2010    (FC) Intermediate Ukrainian. Cr.    4

Prereq: UKR 1020 or equiv. Study in-depth of structure and syntax based on reading. Oral and written practice. Material Fee As Indi­cated In The Schedule of Classes    (F)

UKR 3410    (SLA 3410) (FC) New Soil, Old Roots: The Immigrant Experience. (ARM 3410) (GER 3410) (POL 3410) (RUS 3410) Cr.    3

Armenian, German, Jewish, Polish, Russian and Ukrainian immigra­tion to the United States, its effects on the cultures (language, litera­ture, religion, politics, music, art and theatre) of these ethnic groups and its influence upon American culture.    (F)

 

 

Historical Studies (HS)

ANT 3200    (HS) Lost Cities and Ancient Civilizations. Cr.    3

Required for majors. Early civilizations that developed in different parts of the world in comparative perspective. Hypotheses to explain rise and fall of civilizations, in context of ancient cultures. Basics of archaeology: how facts are formed; meaning of "civilization." How understanding of the past shapes understanding of the present. Geared toward the non-major.    (Y)

ASN 1710    (HIS 1710) (HS) History of Modern East Asia. Cr.    3

Offered for undergraduate credit only. From beginning of nineteenth century to the present; emphasis on political, social, economic devel­opments in China, Japan and Korea.    (I)

CLA 3590    (GKM 3590) (HS) Byzantine Civilization. (CLA 5590) (GKM 5590) Cr.    3

Survey of Byzantine culture, religion, society, and literature from late Antiquity to 1453, through secondary and primary sources in transla­tion.    (Y)

CLA 3720    (GKM 3720) (HS) Modern Greek Cities: An Historical-Ethnographic Study. (GKM 5720) (CLA 5720) Cr.    3

Historical and ethnographic survey of the communities and culture of modern Greek urban centers, from the early modern period to the present.    (I)

CLA 5720    (GKM 3720) (HS) Modern Greek Cities: An Historical-Ethnographic Study. (GKM 5720) (CLA 3720) Cr.    3

Offered for graduate credit only. Historical and ethnographic survey of the communities and culture of modern Greek urban centers, from the early modern period to the present.    (Y)

GKM 3590    (HS) Byzantine Civilization. (GKM 5590) (CLA 3590) (CLA 5590) Cr.    3

Survey of Byzantine culture, religion, society, and literature from late Antiquity to 1453, through secondary and primary sources in transla­tion.    (Y)

GKM 3720    (HS) Modern Greek Cities: An Historical-Ethno­graphic Study. (GKM 5720) (CLA 3720) (CLA 5720) Cr.    3

Historical and ethnographic survey of the communities and culture of modern Greek urban centers, from the early modern period to the present.    (Y)

GKM 5720    (GKM 3720) (HS) Modern Greek Cities: An Historical-Ethnographic Study. (CLA 3720) (CLA 5720) Cr.    3

Offered for graduate credit only. Historical and ethnographic survey of the communities and culture of modern Greek urban centers, from the early modern period to the present.    (Y)

GSW 2600    (HIS 2605) (HS) History of Women, Gender and Sexu­ality in the Modern World. Cr.    3

Examination of change over time; using different historical approaches to try to account for change , from a comparative per­spective, to the experiences of women and constructions of gender and sexual identity.    (F)

HIS 1000    (HS) World Civilization to 1500. Cr.    3-4

No credit after HIS 1100 or HIS 1200. Survey of ancient and medie­val history from the Neolithic Revolution to 1500.    (T)

HIS 1300    (HS) Europe and the World: 1500-1945. Cr.    3-4

No credit after former HIS 1300 or former HIS 2870. The rise of the modern West and the response of the non-West from the age of exploration to the end of World War II. The foundations of the con­temporary world.    (T)

HIS 1400    (HS) The World Since 1945. Cr.    3-4

No credit after former HIS 1040. Selected topics in world history since 1945, including: impact of World War II on Europe and Euro­pean empires; bipolar division of the world between the United States and the Soviet Union; the international order and relations between the industrial nations (First World) and the developing nations (Third World).    (T)

HIS 1600    (HS) African Civilizations to 1800. Cr.    3-4

No credit after former HIS 2400. Africa from ancient Egypt to the Atlantic slave trade. Emphasis on state-building; regional and inter­national commercial networks and their role in economic, political, and socio-cultural change.    (T)

HIS 1610    (HS) African Civilizations Since 1800. Cr.    3-4

No credit after former HIS 2410. The origins of contemporary Africa, nineteenth century state-building, spread of Islamic religion, estab­lishment of European empires, independence struggles, and prob­lems of independence.    (T)

HIS 1710    (HS) History of Modern East Asia. (ASN 1710) Cr.    3

From beginning of nineteenth century to the present; emphasis on political, social and economic developments in China, Japan and Korea.    (I)

HIS 1800    (N E 2030) (HS) The Age of Islamic Empires: 600-1600. Cr.    3

Historical evolution of the Islamic world from birth of Islam to height of Ottoman Empire. Islamic history and civilization in a world-histori­cal context; developments indigenous to specific regions, such as Islamic Spain.    (Y)

HIS 1810    (N E 2040) (HS) The Modern Middle East. Cr.    3

Survey of Middle East history in modern era, focusing on the nine­teenth and twentieth centuries. Ottoman history from 1600: impact of European imperialism and nationalist movements, resulting in devel­opment of modern state systems, regional/national conflicts, and Islamic response to modernization.    (Y)

HIS 1900    (HS) History of Colonial Latin America. (LAS 1900) Cr.    3

The Spanish and Portuguese conquests in the Americas; the multi-racial and class social structures they established as colonies, and the movements for independence, 1492-1822.    (F)

HIS 1910    (HS) Latin America from Independence to the Present. (LAS 1910) Cr.    3

Latin America from early nineteenth century to the 1980s. Major themes include: 1) colonial pasts and political independence; 2) state formation, and the construction of identities at local and national lev­els; 3) elite and popular relations, including cases of rebellion, revolu­tion, and state repression; 4) forms of capitalist development and transformations in class relations, ideologies of economic develop­ment, and linkages to the United States.    (Y)

HIS 1995    (HS) Society and the Economic Transition. Cr.    3

Historical survey of the interaction between technological change, socio-economic systems, and culture. Multi-disciplinary studies of hunting, agrarian, and industrial societies.    (F)

HIS 2605    (HS) History of Women, Gender and Sexuality in the Modern World. (GSW 2600) Cr.    3

Examination of change over time, using different historical approaches to try to account for change as specifically applicable from a comparative perspective to the experiences of women and constructions of gender and sexual identity.    (F)

HON 4250    (HS) Seminar in Historical Studies. Cr.    3 (Max. 9)

Prereq: junior or senior standing; minimum 3.3 cumulative g.p.a. Studies of periods of history in which there has been major transition or change. Honors variant of an approved HS course in General Edu­cation Program.    (Y)

LAS 1900    (HIS 1900) (HS) History of Colonial Latin America. Cr.    3

The Spanish and Portuguese conquests in the Americas; the multi-racial, class and social structures they established as colonies, and the movements for independence, 1492-1822.    (F)

LAS 1910    (HIS 1910) (HS) Latin America from Independence to the Present. Cr.    3

Latin America from early nineteenth century to the 1980s.    (Y)

N E 2030    (N E 2030) (HS) The Age of Islamic Empires: 600-1600. (HIS 1800) Cr.    3

Historical evolution of the Islamic world from birth of Islam to height of Ottoman Empire. Islamic history and civilization in a world-histori­cal context; developments indigenous to specific regions, such as Islamic Spain.    (Y)

N E 2040    (N E 2040) (HS) The Modern Middle East. (HIS 1810) Cr.    3

Survey of Middle East history in modern era, focusing on the nine­teenth and twentieth centuries. Ottoman history from 1600: impact of European imperialism and nationalist movements, resulting in devel­opment of modern state systems, regional/national conflicts, Islamic response to modernization.    (Y)

 

Intermediate Composition Competency (IC)

AFS 2390    (ENG 2390) (IC) Introduction to African-American Lit­erature: Literature and Writing. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020, ENG 1050, former ISP 1510, or equiv. (equiv. means AP credit, IB, CLEP, or transfer credit with grade of C or better). Introduction to major themes and some major writers of African-American literature, emphasizing modern works. Reading and writing about representative poetry, fiction, essays, and plays.    (T)

ENG 2100    (IC) Introduction to Poetry: Literature and Writing. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Introduction to techniques and forms of poetry through critical reading of, and writing about, poems of various types and from many periods.    (Y)

ENG 2110    (IC) Introduction to Drama: Literature and Writing. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Introduction to techniques and forms of drama through critical reading of, and writ­ing about, representative plays from various traditions and periods.    (Y)

ENG 2120    (IC) Introduction to Fiction: Literature and Writing. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Introduction to techniques and forms of fiction through critical reading of, and writing about, short stories and novels.    (T)

ENG 2210    (IC) Great English Novels: Literature and Writing. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Critical reading of, and writing about, a representative sample of important and pleasur­able English novels from the eighteenth century through the modern period.    (Y)

ENG 2310    (IC) Major American Books: Literature and Writing. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Critical reading of, and writing about, representative texts in prose, poetry, and drama by such writers as Emerson, Twain, Dickinson, O'Neill, Ellison.    (Y)

ENG 2390    (IC) Introduction to African-American Literature: Lit­erature and Writing. (AFS 2390) Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Introduction to major themes and some major writers of African-American literature, emphasizing modern works. Reading and writing about representa­tive poetry, fiction, essays, and plays.    (T)

ENG 2420    (IC) Literature and the Professions: Literature and Writing. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Representations of the professions (law, medicine, etc.) in the world of literature.    (I)

ENG 2560    (IC) Children's Literature: Literature and Writing. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Introductory course in writing about the Anglo-American tradition of classic and contemporary children's literature.    (T)

ENG 2570    (IC) Literature By and About Women: Literature and Writing. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Introduction to the major themes and issues of writing by and about women. Reading and writing about representative fictional and non-fictional works.    (T)

ENG 3010    (IC) Intermediate Writing. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Course in reading, research and writing for upper-level students. Emphasis on conduct­ing research by drawing from the sciences, social sciences, human­ities, and professions in preparation for Writing Intensive courses in the majors.    (T)

ENG 3020    (IC) Writing and Community. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Students develop and write about community-based service-learning projects.    (F,W)

ENG 3050    (IC) Technical Communication I: Reports. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Instruction in basic technical writing skills. Requirements include writing summa­ries, letters, memos, instructions, and technical reports. Topics include audience and purpose analysis, textual and visual aspects of document design, and formatting.    (T)

 

Life Sciences (LS)

ANT 2110    (LS) Introduction to Physical Anthropology. Cr.    3

Required for majors. Role of hereditary and environmental factors, human genetics, meaning of "race" and racial classifications, fossil records, non-human primate behavior and evolution.    (T)

BIO 1030    (LS) Biology Today. Cr.    3 (LCT: 3; or LCT: 3; DSC: 1)

Not for biology major credit. Offered for four credits to Honors stu­dents only. Challenges to modern society from population growth, new diseases, environmental degradation, urban pollution; medical advances and ethical dilemmas in decoding human genome; impact of biological findings on political and personal decisions; issues con­sidered in context of principles and strategies of modern biological research.    (F,W)

BIO 1050    (LS) An Introduction to Life. Cr.    3-4 (LCT: 3; or LCT: 3: LAB: 3)

Meets General Education Laboratory Requirement when elected for 4 credits. For the non-science major and as a prereq. to BIO 1500/1510. No credit after BIO 1500 or BIO 1510. A factual and concep­tual treatment of modern biology at the cell, organismal, and popula­tion levels of organization. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

BIO 1510    (LS) Basic Life Mechanisms. Cr.    4 (LAB: 3: LCT: 3)

Prereq: BIO 1050 with grade of C-minus or above; or ACT score of 21 or above (ACT scores valid for only 2 years); or passing score on BIO placement exam; or BIO 1500 with grade of C-minus or above. Only Engineering students may elect for three credits. BIO 1500 and BIO 1510 required of all biological sciences majors. Factual and con­ceptual treatment of cell molecules, cell structure, metabolism, genetics, and development. For the science major and certain pre-professional programs. Meets General Education laboratory require­ment. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

BIO 2200    (LS) Introductory Microbiology. Cr.    4 (LAB: 4: LCT: 3)

Prereq: BIO 1510 with grade of C-minus or above; BIO 1500 recom­mended for Biology majors. Bacteria and their basic biology; the rela­tionship of microorganisms to man and other living forms, including their ecological importance and their role in the causation of disease; laboratory exercises paralleling the above principles. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

HON 4220    (LS) Seminar in Life Science. Cr.    3

Prereq: junior or senior standing; minimum 3.3 cumulative g.p.a. Analysis of aspects, methods, and important issues in various areas of the life sciences. Honors variant of an approved LS course in Gen­eral Education Program.    (Y)

NFS 2030    (LS) Nutrition and Health. Cr.    3

Meets General Education Laboratory Requirement only when taken concurrently with coreq: NFS 2220. Food as a carrier of nutrients; food availability; nutrient utilization including digestion, metabolism and excretion. Patterns of food consumption based on biological, psychological and social needs; and anthropological findings.    (T)

PSY 1010    (LS) Introductory Psychology. Cr.    4

Meets General Education Laboratory Requirement. No credit after PSY 1020. Grade of C or better required for psychology majors. Introduction to the science of behavior. Principles, concepts, and the­ories of human thought and action. Selected concepts illustrated through laboratory experiments. Recommended for students intended to major in psychology.    (T)

PSY 1020    (LS) Elements of Psychology. Cr.    3

No credit after PSY 1010. Principles, theories and applications of psychological knowledge. Intended for non-psychology majors.    (T)

 

Mathematics Competency (MC)

MAT 1000    (MC) Mathematics in Today's World. Cr.    0-3

Prereq: MAT 0900 at WSU with CNC or higher within past 12 months, OR MAT 0993 at WSU with CNC or higher within past twelve months, OR satisfactory score on Mathematics Placement Exam within past 12 months, OR an ACT Mathematics score of 18 or higher, validated by the University's testing office. Applications of mathematics to issues of current interest including patterns, para­doxes, limitations, and possibilities in voting, apportionment and divi­sion processes, using sampling methods, and developing information to support decisions.    (T)

MAT 1050    (MC) Algebra With Trigonometry. Cr.    5 or 7

Prereq: one of following within previous year: satisfactory score on WSU mathematics placement exam; or at least C-minus in MAT 1050 taken at WSU; or grade of CNC or above in MAT 0995 taken at WSU; or validated ACT Math score of 26 or above. Offered only as computer-based instruction. If Main Campus section is elected, stu­dent must complete minimum of three hours per week in Math Com­puter Lab in addition to the two-hour regular class meeting (hours: M - Th 8:30a -8:30p; Fri 8:30a - 4:00p; Sat 10:00a - 2:00p).. Algebra: properties of the real number system, equations and inequalities, lines, graphs, introduction to functions, exponents, logarithms. Geometry and trigonometry: basic concepts, introduction to trigono­metric functions, solving right triangles.    (T)

Oral Communication Competency (OC)

COM 1010    (OC) Oral Communication: Basic Speech. Cr.    3

No credit after former SPB 2000. No new students admitted after first week of classes. Beginning course emphasizing fundamentals of speech preparation. Development of poise and confidence in speak­ing.    (T)

ENG 3060    (OC) Technical Communication II: Presentations. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 3050 or equiv. Instruction in basic technical presentation skills. Requirements include informative presentations, oral briefings, needs assessments, progress reports, and formal proposals. Topics include collaborative teamwork, audi­ence and purpose analysis, textual and visual aspects of presenta­tion design, and formatting.    (T)

 

Philosophy and Letters (PL)

CLA 1010    (PL) Classical Civilization. Cr.    3-4

Survey of the culture and civilization of Ancient Greece and Rome, in particular those aspects that laid the political, social, and cultural framework of the modern world.    (T)

CLA 2200    (PL) Introduction to Greek Tragedy. Cr.    3-4

Dramatic and literary qualities of representative plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides. The origin and development of Greek trag­edy related to the enduring quality and contemporary relevance of these dramas.    (T)

CLA 2300    (PL) Ancient Comedy. Cr.    3

Dramatic and literary qualities of representative plays of Aristo­phanes, Menander, Plautus and Terence. Origins and development of Greek Comedy related to the enduring quality and contemporary relevance of these dramas and their influence on later literature.    (T)

COM 2160    (PL) Contemporary Persuasive Campaigns and Movements. Cr.    3

Critical discussion of the social foundations and values underlying human persuasion. Analysis of persuasive strategies and techniques used in contemporary society: political campaigns, social move­ments, advertising and consumerism in the U.S.    (T)

ENG 2200    (PL) Shakespeare. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Emphasis on the dramatic and literary qualities of the plays: representative comedies, tragedies and histories.    (T)

ENG 2430    (PL) Electronic Literature. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Introductory study of digital narrative and electronic textuality, including a variety of digi­tal-born media such as online literature, gaming and interactive fic­tion.    (Y)

ENG 2500    (PL) The English Bible as Literature. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. The King James text as a literary masterpiece.    (I)

ENG 2510    (PL) Popular Literature. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Introductory study of popular literature. Content may include recent best-sellers, horror, science fiction and prize-winning novels.    (Y)

ENG 2720    (PL) Basic Concepts in Linguistics. (LIN 2720) Cr.    3

Analysis of the structure and use of language, focusing on English, from the standpoint of current linguistic practice. Topics include: pho­netics and sound structure, word structure, syntax, semantics, lan­guage origin and history, dialects, language learning, animal communication, and language in social interaction.    (Y)

ENG 3110    (PL) English Literature to 1700. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Historical survey of British literature from the medieval period to 1700.    (F,W)

ENG 3120    (PL) English Literature after 1700. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Historical survey of British literature from 1700 to the present.    (F,W)

ENG 3130    (PL) American Literature to 1865. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Historical survey of American literature from its beginnings to 1865.    (F,W)

ENG 3140    (PL) American Literature after 1865. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Historical survey of American literature from the Civil War to the present.    (F,W)

ENG 3470    (PL) Survey of African-American Literature. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Historical survey of African-American literature from the early American period to the present.    (Y)

FRE 2700    (GER 2700) (PL) Anguish and Commitment: European Existentialist Literature. (ITA 2700) (RUS 2700) (SPA 2700) Cr.    3-4

Only students in Honors Program may register for four credits. A team-taught interdisciplinary study in English of representative works by European existentialist writers: Dostoevsky, Hesse, Kafka, Piran­dello, Sartre, Camus and Unamuno.    (B)

FRE 2991    (GER 2991) (PL) Understanding the Fairy Tale. Cr.    3

Fairy tale's meaning and role in Western society from the Brothers Grimm to Walt Disney. Methods of fairy-tale interpretation. All lec­tures and reading in English.    (B)

GER 2310    (PL) Short Fiction from Central Europe and Russia. (SLA 2310) Cr.    3

Explores how writers use short fictional forms, such as parable, short story, fairy tale, and satire, to express important themes in the Cen­tral European experience, including violence and cruelty, freedom and imprisonment, utopian visions, and urban life.    (F)

GER 2700    (PL) Anguish and Commitment: European Existential­ist Literature. (FRE 2700) (ITA 2700) (RUS 2700) (SPA 2700) Cr.    3-4

Only students in Honors Program may register for four credits. A team-taught interdisciplinary study in English of representative works by European existentialist writers: Dostoevsky, Hesse, Kafka, Piran­dello, Sartre, Camus, and Unamuno.    (B)

GER 2991    (PL) Understanding the Fairy Tale. (FRE 2991) Cr.    3

Fairy tale's meaning and role in Western society from the Brothers Grimm to Walt Disney. Methods of fairy-tale interpretation. All lec­tures and reading in English.    (B)

GSW 2500    (PL) Humanities Perspectives on Gender, Sexuality, and Women. Cr.    3

Questions surrounding gender and sexuality, focusing on the ways in which they have been constructed and represented in different his­torical periods and geographical location through literature, film, visual objects, the media, and other texts.    (F,W)

HEB 3240    (N E 3240) (PL) Survey of Modern Hebrew Literature in English Translation. Cr.    3

Modern Hebrew literature from the end of the nineteenth century to the present; includes major authors from the European, pre-state and Israeli periods. Texts are in English.    (F)

HON 4200    (PL) Seminar in Philosophy and Letters. Cr.    3 (Max. 9)

Prereq: junior or senior standing; minimum 3.3 cumulative g.p.a. Analysis of meanings given to human experience through study of philosophy or letters. Honors variant of an approved PL course in General Education Program.    (Y)

ITA 2700    (GER 2700) (PL) Anguish and Commitment: European Existentialist Literature. (FRE 2700) (RUS 2700) (SPA 2700) Cr.    3-4

Only students in Honors Program may register for four credits. A team-taught interdisciplinary study in English of representative works by European existentialist writers: Dostoevsky, Hesse, Kafka, Piran­dello, Sartre, Camus, and Unamuno.    (B)

LIN 2720    (ENG 2720) (PL) Basic Concepts in Linguistics. Cr.    3

Analysis of the structure and use of language, focusing on English, from the standpoint of current linguistic practice. Topics include: pho­netics and sound structure, word structure, syntax, semantics, lan­guage origin and history, dialects, language learning and animal communication, and language in social interaction.    (Y)

N E 3240    (N E 3240) (PL) Survey of Modern Hebrew Literature in English Translation. (HEB 3240) Cr.    3

Modern Hebrew literature from the end of the nineteenth century to the present; includes major authors from the European, pre-state and Israeli periods. Texts are in English translation. The texts in Hebrew are also available    (F)

P S 3510    (PL) Law, Authority and Rebellion. Cr.    4

Analysis of major theories of law, authority, freedom, and political obligation; justifications of disobedience, resistance and revolution.    (B)

P S 3520    (PL) Justice. Cr.    4

Analysis of major theories of justice; social, economic and political justice.    (B)

PHI 1010    (PL) Introduction to Philosophy. Cr.    0-4 (LCT: 3; or LCT: 3;DSC: 1)

Survey of some major questions that have occupied philosophers throughout history, such as Does God exist? What is a good person? Do we have free will? Is the mind the same as the brain? What can we really know? Course will acquaint students with major figures both historical and contemporary.    (T)

PHI 1020    (PL) Honors Introduction to Philosophy. Cr.    3-4

Open only to Honors students. Survey of some major questions that have occupied philosophers throughout history, such as Does God exist? What is a good person? Do we have free will? What can we really know? Course will acquaint students with major figures both historical and contemporary.    (I)

PHI 1100    (PL) Contemporary Moral Issues. Cr.    3 (Max. 9)

Critical discussion of contemporary moral issues including pornogra­phy, adultery, same-sex marriage, abortion, preferential treatment, obligations to the poor, capital punishment, terrorism, and others.    (Y)

PHI 1110    (PL) Ethical Issues in Health Care. Cr.    3

Survey of moral issues that arise in the practice of medicine and in pursuit of medical knowledge: abortion, euthanasia, experimentation on human subjects, informed consent, rights to health care, genetic engineering, the concepts of death, health and disease.    (Y)

PHI 1120    (PL) Professional Ethics. Cr.    3

No credit after PHI 1110. Critical examination of moral issues in the workplace, including: discrimination and preferential treatment, sex­ual harassment, whistle-blowing, privacy and disclosure, corporate social responsibility.    (Y)

PHI 1130    (PL) Environmental Ethics. Cr.    3

Is the natural world something to be valued in itself, or is its value exhausted by the uses human beings derive from it? This course introduces students to some of the major views on the subject, anthropocentric (human-centered) and non-anthropocentric.    (Y)

PHI 1200    (PL) Life and Death. Cr.    3

Central philosophical and religious questions about life and death, and the enterprise of answering these questions through reasoning and argument. What is it to be alive, and to die? Do we cease to exist when we die, or might we continue to exist in an afterlife following our deaths? Should we fear or regret the fact that we will die someday, or should we be indifferent to it? Why is killing wrong? Is it always wrong to prevent a life from beginning, or to help someone bring his or her own life to an end? What, if anything, makes a life meaningful? We will study the ways in which these questions are raised and answered in a selection of classic and contemporary works of philos­ophy and literature.    (Y)

PHI 2100    (PL) Ancient Philosophy. Cr.    3

Introduction to the Western philosophical tradition from its origins in Ancient Greece. Readings from the pre-Socratics, Plato, and Aristo­tle.    (B)

PHI 2110    (PL) Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Philosophy. Cr.    3

A survey of the views concerning knowledge and reality of the major European philosophers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries such as Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant.    (B)

PHI 2320    (PL) Introduction to Ethics. Cr.    3

An introduction to some classical and modern views concerning such questions as: What determines the rightness and wrongness of actions? What is the nature of moral reasoning? What constitutes a moral life?    (T)

PHI 3700    (PL) Philosophy of Art. Cr.    3

What are art works? Why are they so moving? What is the nature of the experience they offer? This course introduces the student to some of the schools of thought on these issues. It also attempts to deal with the specific natures of the various artistic media, such as: drama, literature, film, painting, photography, music and opera.    (T)

PHI 2400    (PL) Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion. Cr.    3

Religious beliefs provide subject matter for philosophical study; for example, Are the traditional arguments for the existence of God cred­ible? Does the existence of evil conflict with a belief in God's omnipo­tence and omnibenevolence? What is the value of religious experience?    (I)

PHI 2550    (PL) Introduction to Philosophy of Science. Cr.    3

Distinguishing science from non-science; how scientific knowledge is established; what constitutes scientific progress; whether science is cumulative; the place of science in the enterprise of knowledge and rational belief.    (B)

PHI 3500    (PL) Theory of Knowledge. Cr.    3

The distinction between knowledge and belief is germane to every field of inquiry. What is the difference between knowledge and belief? Do we know anything at all? If so, how? Are we ever in a position of being certain about beliefs pertaining to an objective world? Is our belief in an objective world based on our subjective experiences?    (T)

PHI 3550    (PL) Metaphysics. Cr.    3

Survey and examination of some of the enduring questions of meta­physics concerning the nature of reality. Topics include: the nature of physical objects, abstract entities, the concepts of time and change, the relation between mind and body, causation, the nature of meta­physics.    (Y)

RUS 2700    (GER 2700) (PL) Anguish and Commitment: European Existentialist Literature. (FRE 2700) (ITA 2700) (SPA 2700) Cr.    3-4

Only students in Honors Program may register for four credits. A team-taught interdisciplinary study in English of representative works by European existentialist writers: Dostoevsky, Hesse, Kafka, Piran­dello, Sartre, Camus, and Unamuno.    (W)

RUS 3600    (PL) Nineteenth Century Russian Literature. (RUS 5600) Cr.    3

Major Russian writers, including Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chek­hov, and others. How literature reflects and grows out of history; how culture is affected by writers and poets. Taught in English; readings in English.    (F)

RUS 3650    (PL) Russian Literature Since 1900. (RUS 5650) Cr.    3

Twentieth century Russian literature as it explores the universal questions of love, death, rebirth, spirituality, and despair against a background of war, revolution, political oppression and economic col­lapse. Close analysis of major works of prose and poetry as well as literary currents such as Russian modernism, Socialist Realism, and post-modernism. Taught in English; readings in English.    (B)

SLA 2310    (GER 2310) (PL) Short Fiction from Central Europe and Russia. Cr.    3

Explores how writers use short fictional forms, such as parable, short story, fairy tale, and satire, to express important themes in the Cen­tral European experience, including violence and cruelty, freedom and imprisonment, utopian visions, and urban life.    (F)

SPA 2700    (GER 2700) (PL) Anguish and Commitment: European Existentialist Literature. (FRE 2700) (ITA 2700) (RUS 2700) Cr.    3-4

Only students in Honors Program may register for four credits. A team-taught interdisciplinary study in English of representative works by European existentialist writers: Dostoevsky, Hesse, Kafka, Piran­dello, Sartre, Camus, and Unamuno.    (B)

 

Physical Sciences (PS)

AST 2010    (PS) Descriptive Astronomy. Cr.    4

Meets General Education Laboratory requirement only when taken with Coreq: AST 2011. Lecture course that introduces the concepts and methods of modern astronomy, the solar system, stars, galaxies, and cosmology; recent discoveries about planets, moons, the sun, pulsars, quasars, and black holes.    (T)

CHM 1000    (PS) Chemistry and Your World. Cr.    4

Meets General Education Laboratory Requirement when elected for 4 credits. Facts and theories from analytical, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry, and from biochemistry; their consequences in life processes and the environment. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (F,W)

CHM 1020    (PS) Survey of General Chemistry. Cr.    4

Prereq: Math Department placement beyond MAT 0993; or grade of C or above in MAT 0993; or validated ACT Math score of 18 or above. Meets General Education Laboratory Requirement. High school chemistry not required. First course in the terminal sequence consisting of CHM 1020 and CHM 1030. Matter and energy in chem­istry, chemical symbols and equations, structure and properties of atoms, introduction to chemical bonding; periodicity in chemistry, sol­ids, liquids, gases, solutions, acids and bases, and equilibrium. Mate­rial Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (F,W)

CHM 1220    (PS) General Chemistry I. Cr.    4

Prereq: passing score on chemistry placement exam or CHM 1040 with grade of C-minus or above; Math Department placement in or beyond MAT 1800; coreq: CHM 1230. Satisfies General Education laboratory requirement upon completion of both CHM 1220 and 1230. Only two credits if taken after CHM 1020. No credit after if f taken after CHM 1225. Introduction to the principles of chemistry for students with high school background in chemistry. Chemical struc­ture, bonding, and reactivity.    (T)

CHM 1225    (PS) General Chemistry I for Engineers. Cr.    3

Open only to students in College of Engineering. Prereq: passing score on chemistry placement exam or CHM 1040 with grade of C-minus or above; Math Department placement in or beyond MAT 1800; coreq: CHM 1230. Satisfies General Education laboratory requirement upon completion of both CHM 1225 and 1230. Only one credit after CHM 1020. No credit after CHM 1220. Introduction to principles of chemistry for students with high school background in chemistry. Chemical structure, bonding, and reactivity.    (T)

CHM 1410    (PS) Chemical Principles I: General/Organic Chemis­try. Cr.    6

Prereq: advanced placement in chemistry with a score of 3, 4, or 5; or outstanding performance on chemistry placement exam; or evi­dence of superior academic potential; or consent of instructor. Meets General Education laboratory requirement. Accelerated approach to blended general/organic chemistry. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (I)

GEL 1010    (PS) Geology: The Science of the Earth. Cr.    4

Meets General Education Laboratory Requirement. Introduction to continental drift and plate tectonic theory, geophysics and structure of earth's crust and interior; rocks and minerals; igneous and volcanic geology; work of running water, glaciers and ground water; geologic time; oceanography. One day field trip. Lecture and required labora­tory. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

HON 4230    (PS) Seminar in Physical Science. Cr.    3

Prereq: junior or senior standing; minimum 3.3 cumulative g.p.a. Analysis of modern theory and data, implications and possibilities in the physical sciences. Honors variant of an approved PS course in the General Education Program.    (Y)

PHY 1020    (PS) Conceptual Physics: The Basic Science. Cr.    3-4

Meets General Education Laboratory Requirement when elected for 4 credits (fee applies). Physical concepts and practical applications to everyday life of the basic principles of motion, forces, energy, mat­ter, heat, sound, electricity, magnetism, and light. Lectures, demon­strations and optional laboratory; laboratory is strongly recommended. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

PHY 1040    (PS) Einstein, Relativity and Quanta: A Conceptual Introduction. Cr.    3-4

Offered for four credits only to Honors students. Einstein and the ori­gin of the special theory of relativity; the curvature of space; the uncertainty principle; the quantum theory; the interaction of observer and measurement; fission and fusion; the influence of modern physi­cal theories on society and philosophy. Honors students have one additional hour per week of recitation and are required to write a major paper.    (W)

PHY 1070    (PS) Energy and the Environment. Cr.    3-4

Prereq: high school algebra. Meets General Education Laboratory requirement when elected for four credits. Introduction to energy pro­duction and usage, and environmental impact. Topics include: fossil fuel, electrical energy, nuclear power, solar power, wind energy, hydrogen power. Lectures, demonstrations, and optional laboratory. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (I)

PHY 2130    (PS) General Physics. Cr.    4

Prereq: high school algebra and trigonometry; coreq: PHY 2131. Sat­isfies General Education laboratory requirement only when taken concurrently with PHY 2131. No credit after PHY 2170. For general Liberal Arts and Sciences students and for students preparing for medicine, dentistry, pharmacy and health sciences. Mechanics, ther­mal physics, wave motions, and optics.    (T)

PHY 2170    (PS) University Physics for Scientists I. Cr.    4

Prereq: MAT 2010; coreq: MAT 2020, PHY 2171. Satisfies General Education laboratory requirement only when taken concurrently with PHY 2171. No credit after PHY 2175. For students specializing in physics, biology, chemistry, mathematics or engineering. Statics, kinematics, dynamics, energy and linear momentum, rotational kine­matics and dynamics, angular momentum, solids and fluids, vibra­tions and wave motion, thermodynamics.    (T)

PHY 2175    (PS) University Physics for Engineers I. Cr.    4

Prereq: MAT 2010; coreq: MAT 2020. Open only to College of Engi­neering students; others by written consent of instructor. No credit after PHY 2170. For students specializing in engineering. Statics, kinematics, dynamics, energy and linear momentum, rotational kine­matics and dynamics, angular momentum, solids and fluids, vibra­tions and wave motion, thermodynamics.    (T)

PHY 3100    (PS) The Sounds of Music. Cr.    4

Prereq: sophomore standing. Meets General Education Laboratory Requirement. For music majors and other students interested in the physical foundations of the production, perception, and reproduction of musical sounds. Makes only limited use of simple mathematics. Includes topics such as wave properties, loudness levels and the human ear, hearing loss, tone quality, frequency and pitch, musical intervals and tuning, room acoustics, the production of sound by var­ious musical instruments, and electronic reproduction of music. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (F)

 

Social Sciences (SS)

AFS 2210    (SS) Black Social and Political Thought. Cr.    4

Core requirement for African American Studies majors. Survey of the Black intellectual and political tradition from the United States, the Caribbean and Africa.    (T)

ANT 2100    (SS) Introduction to Anthropology. Cr.    3-4

Required for majors. Study of humanity, past and present: cultural diversity and change, human evolution, biological variability, archae­ology, ethnography, language, and contemporary uses of anthropol­ogy.    (T)

ECO 1000    (SS) Survey of Economics. Cr.    4

Not for ECO major or minor credit. Scope of economics and the task of the economist in modern society; the market economy, its evolu­tion and development; non-market economies; economic problems and prospects in the contemporary world.    (T)

ECO 2010    (SS) Principles of Microeconomics. Cr.    3-4

(Note: ECO 2010 is not a prerequisite for ECO 2020.) Supply, demand, price at the level of the firm and industry; business institu­tions and their operation; determinants of wage and salary levels, interest rates, rent, profits, income distribution; public policy in rela­tion to business and labor.    (T)

ECO 2020    (SS) Principles of Macroeconomics. Cr.    3-4

(Note: ECO 2010 is not a prerequisite for ECO 2020.) Determination of national income, consumption and saving, and investment; money, banking and the Federal Reserve; inflation and unemployment; mon­etary and fiscal policy; economic growth and productivity; the interna­tional sector.    (T)

GPH 1100    (SS) World Regional Patterns. Cr.    4

Concepts and theory in analyzing areal relationships and distinguish­ing regional patterns of human activity; cultural factors and physical conditions (climate, landforms) as factors in regional delineations; comparisons and contrasts in regional economic development; anal­ysis of concentrations/dispersals of human activity; local, national and regional phenomena in the interpretation of global patterns.    (T)

GPH 2000    (U S 2000) (SS) Introduction to Urban Studies. (HIS 2000) (P S 2000) (SOC 2500) Cr.    4

Urban phenomena both past and present, including the quality and nature of urban life; major concerns of urban areas; perspectives and techniques of various urban-related disciplines.    (T)

GPH 3130    (SS) Introductory Urban Geography. Cr.    4

An introduction to the geographer's view of cities, with emphasis on the North American city. Topics include the pre-industrial city, migra­tion, evolution of the American urban pattern, city classification, city-regional relationships, and the city's internal structure (ethnic, resi­dential, commercial, and industrial).    (Y)

GPH 3200    (SS) Europe. Cr.    3

Analysis of European countries. Emphasis on population changes resource problems, industrial location, urbanization, regional devel­opment, and emerging economic and political unities.    (I)

GSW 2700    (SS) Social Science Perspectives on Gender, Sexual­ity, and Women. Cr.    3

Understanding the ways in which political, social and cultural institu­tions shape gender, sexuality, and women's experiences within a local and global context.    (F,W)

HIS 2000    (U S 2000) (SS) Introduction to Urban Studies. (GPH 2000) (P S 2000) (SOC 2500) Cr.    4

Urban phenomena, past and present, quality and nature of urban life, major concerns of urban areas; perspectives and techniques of vari­ous urban-related disciplines.    (T)

HON 1000    (SS) The City. Cr.    0-3

Prereq: freshman Honors standing. First half of the Honors freshman first-year experience. Urban phenomena, past and present; quality and nature of urban areas; critical approaches to urban issues.    (F)

LAS 3610    (SS) Seminar in Latino/a Urban Problems. Cr.    3

Historical and current issues in economics, politics, and culture involving the multi-racial and multi-ethnic Latino/a population of the United States.    (I)

P S 1000    (SS) Introduction to Political Science. Cr.    3

Introduction to the scope and method of political science. Overview of politics, political systems, nature and role of political institutions. Empirical political theory; practice in conducting political research.    (Y)

P S 2000    (U S 2000) (SS) Introduction to Urban Studies. (GPH 2000) (HIS 2000) (SOC 2500) Cr.    4

Urban phenomena, past and present; quality and nature of urban life; major concerns of urban areas; perspectives and techniques of vari­ous urban-related disciplines.    (Y)

P S 2240    (SS) Introduction to Urban Politics and Policy. Cr.    4

Influences on politics and problems of cities, forms of local political involvement, role of local public officials, impact of state and federal policies. Overview of current issues and problems in specific policy areas.    (Y)

SOC 2000    (SS) Understanding Human Society. Cr.    3

Analysis of basic sociological concepts and principles to give the stu­dent an understanding of the perspective that sociology brings to the study of human society.    (T)

SOC 2020    (SS) Social Problems. Cr.    3

Consideration of major contemporary social problems which reveal structural strains, value conflicts, deviations and changes in society. Analysis of socio-cultural factors creating problems and of possible solutions.    (T)

SOC 2500    (U S 2000) (SS) Introduction to Urban Studies. (GPH 2000) (HIS 2000) (P S 2000) Cr.    4

Urban phenomena both past and present, including the quality and nature of urban life; major concerns of urban areas; perspectives and techniques of various urban related disciplines.    (Y)

SOC 3300    (SS) Social Inequality. Cr.    4

Structure and process in society, institutions, communities, and orga­nizations. Scientific analysis of organization, conflict, and change in the economy, government, religion, education, and family.    (Y)

SOC 3510    (SS) The Nature and Impact of Population on Society. Cr.    3

Birth, death and migration investigated with respect to their social causes and consequences for society and human behavior. The pop­ulation explosion and its implication for government policy. Recom­mended for students interested in urban studies, medicine, nursing, political science and history.    (B)

SOC 4100    (SS) Social Psychology. Cr.    4

An introduction to the major issues in social psychology. Topics such as socialization, social perception, self-conceptions and social defini­tions of selves and situations.    (T)

U S 2000    (U S 2000) (SS) Introduction to Urban Studies. (GPH 2000) (HIS 2000) (P S 2000) (SOC 2500) Cr.    4

Urban phenomena, past and present, quality and nature of urban life, major concerns of urban areas; perspectives and techniques of vari­ous urban-related disciplines.    (T)

 

Visual and Performing Arts (VP)

A H 1110    (VP) Survey of Art History: Ancient through Medieval. Cr.    3-4

Offered for four credits only to Honors students. Survey of traditions and major developments in visual expression in the West, prehistory through Medieval period. Art studied in context of its cultures; tech­niques of visual analysis.    (T)

A H 1120    (VP) Survey of Art History: Renaissance through Mod­ern. Cr.    3-4

Offered for four credits to Honors students only. Traditions and devel­opments in visual expression in the West, Renaissance through twentieth century. Art in context of its cultures; techniques of visual analysis.    (T)

A H 1130    (VP) Encounters with the Arts of Global Africa. Cr.    3

Introductory survey of the arts of Africa and the African Diaspora, focusing on the visual culture of cross-cultural contact within Africa and beyond.    (F,W)

A H 4240    (HON 4240) (VP) Seminar in Visual and Performing Arts. Cr.    3 (Max. 9)

Prereq: junior standing or above in College of Fine, Performing and Communication Arts, or Honors College; consent of instructor. Histor­ical examination of role and function of art and the visual artist in modern society; includes service learning component in which stu­dents engage in projects relating to the visual or performance arts in the Detroit community.    (Y)

AED 5050    (VP) Integrating the Arts into the Elementary Class­room. Cr.    3

Undergrad. prereq: Level II only, ELE 3320 plus two methods courses; graduate prereq: MAT degree student, TED 5150 as part of professional sequence. Introductory course: integration of visual arts, music, dance, and theatre into the teaching, learning and curriculum of the elementary classroom. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (F,W)

COM 2010    (ENG 2450) (VP) Introduction to Film. Cr.    4

Examination of film techniques and basic methods of film analysis. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

COM 2020    (ENG 2460) (VP) History of Film. Cr.    3

Critical study of the motion picture as a modern visual art; screening and analysis of representative fiction films to illustrate historical peri­ods and genres. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

DNC 2000    (VP) Introduction to World Dance. Cr.    3

Global perspective on and definition of dance, through assigned readings, writing, field trips, and laboratory experience. Focus on multicultural diversity, interdependent nature of dance. Material Fee as indicated in Schedule of Classes.    (T)

DNC 2310    (VP) History of Dance from 1800 to the Present. Cr.    3

Introduction to critical dance studies and dance history from 1800-present. Impact of vernacular dance and historical ballet and modern concert dance on contemporary dance, examined formally and socio-culturally. How dance circulates globally as mediated and embodied history. Material Fee as indicated in Schedule of Classes.    (F,W)

ENG 2440    (VP) Introduction to Visual Culture. Cr.    3

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Introductory course in the reading of images from the perspective of literary and cultural studies. Attention to basic concepts, terms, and theories in the study of visual culture.    (Y)

ENG 2450    (VP) Introduction to Film. (COM 2010) Cr.    4

Prereq: grade of C or better in ENG 1020 or equiv. Examination of film techniques and basic methods of film analysis. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

HON 4240    (HON 4240) (VP) Seminar in Visual and Performing Arts. (A H 4240) Cr.    3 (Max. 9)

Prereq: junior or senior standing; minimum 3.3 cumulative g.p.a. Analysis of ways the visual or performing arts may be appreciated, evaluated, and criticized. Honors variant of an approved VP course in the General Education Program.    (Y)

MUH 1340    (VP) Music Appreciation: World Music. Cr.    3

Open only to non-music majors. Introduction to the musical styles of Africa, Asia, South America, and the Middle East.    (T)

MUH 1345    (VP) Music Cultures. Cr.    3

Open only to B.A. music majors and B.Mus. majors; not open to stu­dents who have completed MUH 1340. Indigenous musics and cul­tures of Asia, Africa and the Americas; emphasis on features of the musics that have influenced Western art musics.    (W)

MUH 1350    (VP) History of American Popular Music. Cr.    3

History of American popular music from the early nineteenth century to the present. Political, economic, social, and cultural influences on music.    (W)

MUH 1351    (VP) History and Styles of Rock and Roll. Cr.    3

Exploration of American "mainstream" and "subcultural" popular music; focus on art, technology, business, cultural contexts.    (Y)

MUH 1370    (VP) Music Appreciation: Beginnings to the Present. Cr.    3

Survey of Western music from its beginnings to the present. Devel­oping musical understanding and critical listening skills by focusing on major composers and styles, and by concentrating on social, polit­ical and cultural influences.    (T)

N E 2060    (VP) Hebrew/Israeli Film: Trends and Themes in Israeli Cinema. Cr.    3

Evolution of Hebrew/Israeli cinema from the beginning of the twenti­eth century to the present. Collectivism to individual concerns. From Yaakov Ben-Dov to Joseph Cedar. Course taught in English; films have English subtitles.    (F)

POL 3750    (VP) Polish and Yugoslavian Cinema. (SLA 3750) Cr.    3

Two national cinemas introduced through milestone films and lesser-known cinematic gems produced before and after the fall of commu­nism.    (W)

SLA 3710    (VP) Russian and East European Film. Cr.    3-4

Major Russian, Polish, Czech, Ukrainian and Armenian films viewed and discussed from political, historical, cultural and aesthetic points of view.    (Y)

SLA 3750    (POL 3750) (VP) Polish and Yugoslavian Cinema. Cr.    3

Two national cinemas introduced through milestone films and lesser-known cinematic gems produced before and after the fall of commu­nism.    (W)

THR 1010    (VP) Introduction to the Theatre. Cr.    3

No credit after THR 1111. Historical, critical and cultural aspects of theatre and drama discussed relative to play attendance.    (T)

THR 1030    (VP) Introduction to Black Theatre and Performance. Cr.    3

Origins, development, and current trends with production techniques and problems related to the special area of the drama. Material fee as given in Schedule of Classes.    (T)

THR 1041    (VP) Musical Theatre Appreciation. Cr.    3

Survey of American musical theatre from its multiple historical origins to the present. Development of musical theatre understanding and critical observational skills through focus on the ways in which the genre has emerged through interactions between musical theatre artists and their audiences. (Formerly THR 1200.) Material fee as given in Schedule of Classes.    (F,W)

 

Writing Intensive Competency (WI)

A H 5090    (WI) Theory and Methods of Art Historical Research. Cr.    3

Prereq: consent of instructor. Introduction to the methods of research in art history. History of the discipline's methodology examined through selective readings.    (I)

A H 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Fine Arts. Cr.    0

Open only to undergraduate art history majors in B.A. or B.F.A. pro­gram. Prereq: junior standing, satisfactory completion of the IC requirement, completion of A H 1110 and A H 1120 and one other A H course at 2000-level or above; coreq: A H course at 3000-level or above. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors.    (F,W)

ACS 5997    (WI) Senior Seminar in the Visual Arts. Cr.    3

Prereq: prior consent of undergraduate advisor. Open only to senior art majors in B.F.A. program. Offered for undergraduate credit only. Interdisciplinary seminar on contemporary issues in the visual arts including studio practices, history, and criticism. Satisfies the General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (F,W)

AFA 5997    (WI) Seminar. Cr.    3

Prereq: senior standing and satisfactory completion of the IC require­ment. Open only to upper division design majors in B.A., B.S., or M.A. program. Offered for undergraduate credit only. Topics to be announced in Schedule of Classes. Course satisfies the General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (W)

AFS 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in African American Studies. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing, consent of instructor; coreq: AFS 3160, 3180, 3200, 3250, 3420, 3610, or 5110. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for African American Studies majors. Disciplined writing assignments under the direction of a fac­ulty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a designated core­quisite; see section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writ­ing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

AGD 5260    (WI) Senior Seminar. Cr.    3

Prereq: senior standing. Open only to upper division art majors in B.A. or B.F.A. program; or M.A. program art majors. Issues affecting the theory, history, and practice of design; impact of design on soci­ety and impact of society on design. Required readings, student pre­sentations, class discussion, slide lectures, guest speakers. Satisfies the General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major require­ment. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (W)

AIA 5997    (WI) Senior Seminar. Cr.    3

Prereq: consent of instructor. Open only to senior art majors in B.A. or B.F.A. program, or art majors in M.A. program. Investigation of designers, styles, and periods of interior design through charettes and documentation. Resume and portfolio development and review; writing of intensive research paper. Material Fee announced in Schedule of Classes.    (W)

AID 5997    (WI) Senior Seminar. Cr.    3

Prereq: senior standing in industrial design concentration. Open only to senior art majors in B.A. or B.F.A. program, or art M.A. students. Seminar on contemporary issues in industrial design including pro­fessional concerns in transportation and product design, presenta­tion, and production. Satisfies the General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (B)

ANT 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Anthropology. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing, satisfactory completion of the IC require­ment, consent of instructor; coreq: ANT 5310 or 5996 taught by full-time faculty member. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a course designated as a corequisite. See section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing-Intensive Course in the Major requirement. Within first three weeks of enrollment in corequi­site course, student must notify instructor of enrollment in ANT 5993.    (T)

ASN 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Asian Studies. Cr.    0

Coreq: enrollment in any Asian Studies course of 3000-level or above. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for majors. Disciplined writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a designated corequisite. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Inten­sive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

AST 4200    (WI) Astronomical Laboratory. Cr.    2

Coreq: AST 4100 or consent of instructor. Introduction to laboratory techniques of modern astrophysics. Optical astronomy, including measurement of the quantum efficiency of a CCD-based astronomi­cal digital camera; measurement of the throughput as a function of wavelength of a set of standard astronomical filters; measurement of the HR diagram of a star cluster using the calibrated camera and fil­ters. Material fee as indicated in Schedule of Classes.    (F)

BIO 4110    (WI) Biomedical Technology and Molecular Biology. Cr.    4

Prereq: BIO 3070 and BIO 3100 with grades of C-minus or above. General principles of molecular biology of prokaryotes and eukary­otes. Includes structures of DNA, RNA, and protein, DNA replication and repair, transcription and translation, gene regulation and gene expression. Emphasis on applications in medical biology and bio­technology. Fulfills General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement; each student writes reports and one long research paper on topic approved by instructor, in addition to other course writing requirements.    (F)

BIO 4120    (WI) Comparative Physiology. Cr.    4 (LCT: 3)

Prereq: BIO 3070 and BIO 3200 with grades of C-minus or above. Physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels. Comparison of major physiological systems across groups of organisms. Lab consists of physiology exercises and lab reports that allow students to explore major conceptual themes in physiology. Fulfills General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement; each student writes reports, and one long research paper on topic approved by instructor, in addition to other course writ­ing requirements. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

BIO 4130    (WI) General Ecology. Cr.    4 (LAB: 3: LCT: 3)

Prereq: BIO 3070 and BIO 3500 with grades of C-minus or above, or consent of instructor; consent of departmental advisor for Environ­mental Sciences majors. Principles of population, community, eco­system, and landscape ecology. Fulfills General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement; each student writes reports and one long research paper on topic approved by instructor, in addition to other course writing requirements. Material Fee As Indi­cated In The Schedule of Classes    (W)

BME 4910    (WI) Biomedical Engineering Capstone Design I. Cr.    3

Open only to students in the Biomedical Engineering program. Pre­req: BME 3920; senior standing. First in a two-semester sequence during which student teams develop a design to address a biomedi­cal engineering challenge; includes discussions with clinical faculty, analysis of current solutions, and finalization of conceptual design.    (F)

C E 4995    (WI) Senior Design Project. Cr.    3

Prereq: senior standing in civil engineering. Open only to students enrolled in professional engineering programs. Capstone design experience through civil engineering projects. Satisfies General Edu­cation Writing Intensive requirement.    (W)

CHE 4800    (WI) Chemical Process Integration. Cr.    3

Prereq: CHE 4200. Open only to students enrolled in professional engineering programs. Application of engineering and science back­ground to the design of chemical processes. Comprehensive prob­lems deal with sources of data, design principles and optimization techniques.    (F)

CHE 6810    (WI) Chemical Engineering Research Project. Cr.    4

Prereq: CHE 4200, CHE 5710, and written consent of advisor. Appli­cation of engineering and science background to the completion of a senior research project. Methods of research and analysis and inter­pretation of data. Preparation of a written research paper; oral pre­sentation of research results.    (W)

CHM 5550    (WI) Physical Chemistry Laboratory. Cr.    2

Prereq. or coreq: CHM 5400 or CHM 5420 or CHM 5440 or equiv.; and PHY 2180 or equiv. Principles of measurement. Fundamental investigations of thermodynamics. Fundamental spectroscopic and kinetic measurements. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (F,W)

CHM 6610    (WI) Biological Chemistry Laboratory. Cr.    3

Prereq: a grade of C or above in CHM 6620 or equiv. Open only to chemistry majors. Basic experiments in isolation, purification, and analysis of biomolecules. Techniques currently used in molecular biology and recombinant DNA procedures stressed. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (F,W)

CLA 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Classical Civilization. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing, satisfactory completion of the IC require­ment, consent of instructor; coreq: any CLA, GKA, GKM, or LAT course numbered 3000 or higher which satisfies the major require­ment. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Grade in CLA 5993 is independent of grade in corequi­site course. Disciplined writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a designated corequisite; see section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequi­sites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

CLS 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Clinical Laboratory Science. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing, satisfactory completion of the IC require­ment, consent of instructor; coreq: any 3000-level or higher course in the department and written consent of chairperson. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Course must be elected in conjunction with designated corequisite; see Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

CMT 4200    (WI) Senior Project. Cr.    3

Prereq: senior standing; for students in B.S. in construction manage­ment major. Capstone project; senior students work in teams; appli­cation of skills, knowledge, techniques and concepts. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (W)

COM 2230    (WI) Broadcast News Writing and Digital Editing. Cr.    3

Prereq: COM 1500; must have access to an audio recorder. Theory and practice in broadcast newswriting, reporting, performing and editing. Writing Intensive course for broadcasting sequence in Jour­nalism major. Material Fee as indicated in the Schedule of Classes    (T)

COM 3010    (WI) Media Analysis and Criticism. Cr.    3

Prereq: COM 1500 with grade of C or above, or consent of instructor. Open only to department majors. Formal properties and aesthetic considerations in media, especially film, television and interactive media. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

COM 3300    (WI) Business and Professional Presentations. Cr.    3

Prereq: ENG 3010 with grade of C or above; and COM 1010. Review and practice of various oral communication forms used in modern organizations. Topics include persuasive speaking, informative speaking, speech writing, multi-media presentations and business and report writing. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

COM 3400    (WI) Theories of Communication. Cr.    3

Exploration of the role of theory in describing, explaining and predict­ing human communication behavior in face-to-face and mediated contexts.    (T)

COM 4100    (WI) Feature Writing. Cr.    3

Prereq: COM 3100 with grade of C or above. Advanced news report­ing, focusing on feature writing. Material Fee as given in Schedule of Classes.    (T)

COM 4170    (WI) Public Relations Writing. Cr.    3

Prereq: COM 2030 and COM 3170 with grade of C or above. Writing for public relations purposes: backgrounders, fact sheets, press releases; brochures and newsletters.    (F,W)

COM 4560    (WI) Telecommunications Policy: A Political Econ­omy Approach. Cr.    3

Prereq: COM 1500. Satisfies the University General Education Writ­ing Intensive Course in the Major requirement, in the Media Arts and Studies curriculum. Introduction to both the process of developing telecommunications policies and the impact of these policies in the United States.    (W)

COM 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing, written consent of instructor, satisfactory completion of the IC requirement. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all Film Studies majors. Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a designated corequisite; see section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

CRJ 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Criminal Justice. Cr.    0

Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for CRJ majors. Prereq: completion of General Education BC and IC require­ments, submission of Writing Intensive (CRJ 5993) contract, signed by co-requisite instructor, to major advisor before the end of the sec­ond week of the semester; coreq: one of the following: CRJ 3200, CRJ 3350, CRJ 3550, or CRJ 3800. Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunc­tion with a course designated as a corequisite; see Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major require­ment. Students must submit and endorse the Writing Intensive (CRJ 5993 Contract stating the departmentally-approved requirements of the research writing project.    (T)

CSC 4996    (WI) Senior Project and Computer Ethics. Cr.    3

Prereq: CSC 4110 and CSC 4111, both with grade of C-minus or bet­ter; senior standing in computer science; coreq: CSC 4997. Develop­ment of skills for planning, managing, implementing, and documenting complex software projects; legal, social and ethical issues in software development and computer use. Project manage­ment techniques; professional conduct, social responsibility, liability, ownership of information, privacy, security and crime.    (F,W)

DNC 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Dance. Cr.    0

Open only to undergraduates. Prereq: junior standing; satisfactory completion of the General Education IC requirement; consent of instructor; coreq: DNC 3310 or DNC 2300 or DNC 2310 or DNC 3810 or DNC 4910. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required of all majors. Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a course designated as a corequisite. See Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

E T 4999    (WI) Senior Project. Cr.    3 (LAB: 3;DSC: 2)

Prereq: satisfactory completion of the IC requirement, COM 1010. Must be taken during last semester before graduation. Student designs, builds, and tests product; philosophy of design. Project pro­posal to be submitted by second week, final outcome to be com­pleted by thirteenth week; progress reports, and oral presentation required.    (F,W)

ECE 4600    (WI) Capstone Design I. Cr.    4 (LCT: 4)

Prereq: ENG 3050, ECE 3570, ECE 3620, senior standing. Open only to students enrolled in professional engineering programs. Design principles, subsystems of microcontrollers; designing prod­ucts using microcontrollers, sensors and actuators.    (T)

ECO 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Economics. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing; satisfactory completion of the IC General Education requirement; consent of instructor; coreq: any ECO course at 5000-level or above. Offered for S and U grades only. Open only to undergraduates. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disci­plinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

ENG 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in English. Cr.    0

Prereq: satisfactory completion of General Education IC requirement, written consent of departmental Undergraduate Advisor; coreq: ENG 4991, ENG 5992, or an approved 5000-level ENG course. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disci­plinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

FRE 5100    (WI) Advanced Composition. Cr.    3

Prereq: any two of FRE 2100, 2110, 3200 or consent of instructor. Focus on advanced composition skills through a close analysis of dif­ferent types of texts with the goal of developing vocabulary and advanced writing and speaking abilities.    (W)

GEL 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Geology. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing; satisfactory completion of the IC require­ment; consent of instructor; coreq: GEL 3160 or 3300 or 3400 or 3450. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with course desig­nated as corequisite. See section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (F,W)

GER 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in German. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing, satisfactory completion of the IC require­ment, consent of instructor; coreq: GER 4600 or any 5000-level Ger­man literature course. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a course designated as a corequisite; see section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (F,W)

H E 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Health Education. Cr.    0

Open only to Health Education majors. Coreq: KHS 5522. Disciplined writing assignments under direction of a faculty member. Must be taken with KHS 5522. Satisfies University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (F)

H E 6430    (WI) School Health Curriculum. Cr.    3

Offered for S and U grades only. Prereq: H E 3330 or H E 6500. Prin­ciples and application of school health programming. Philosophy and foundations of health education, conducting a needs assessment and design instruction based on the assessment, implementing and evaluating the instruction, implementation of skills in a secondary classroom, assessment of the process. Satisfies General Education program Writing Intensive requirement for health teaching majors.    (W)

HIS 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in History. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing, satisfactory completion of the IC require­ment; coreq: HIS 5996. Offered for S and U grades only. Open only to majors. Required for all majors. Students write term paper of approximately twenty typed pages, including footnotes and anno­tated bibliography. Must be selected in conjunction with the Capstone Course for Majors. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (F,W)

I E 4310    (WI) Production Control. Cr.    3

Prereq: ENG 3050. Open only to students enrolled in professional engineering programs. The design of production planning and control systems. Materials management, forecasting, planning, scheduling of production systems, the planning and scheduling for large scale projects and introduction to the design of computerized materials management systems. Applications of operations research models to production control problems.    (W)

ITA 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Italian. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing, consent of instructor; coreq: any 3000- or 6000-level Italian literature course. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disciplinary writing assign­ments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with designated corequisite; see section listing in Sched­ule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the Uni­versity General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (F,W)

KIN 3550    (WI) Motor Learning and Control. Cr.    3

Study of motor skill acquisition and motor control with applications to physical activity. Focus on cognitive processes and neural mecha­nisms which contribute to motor learning and control. Satisfies Gen­eral Education program Writing Intensive requirement for kinesiology majors.    (I)

LBS 4700    (WI) Senior Seminar. Cr.    3 (Max. 6)

Prereq: consent of instructor. Research, reflection, discussion and analysis of labor relations practice.    (Y)

LIN 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Linguistics. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing and satisfactory completion of the General Education IC requirement; coreq: student should register for this course in conjunction with one of: LIN 5210, 5320, 5750, 5760, 5770, 6720, or any linguistics course at the 5000-level or above that requires a term paper. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a corequisite course; see section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement. Inten­sive training in literature search, linguistic analysis, and the prepara­tion of scholarly written work.    (T)

M E 4500    (M E 4500) (WI) Mechanical Engineering Design II. (M E 5500) Cr.    4

Prereq: M E 4250, ENG 3060, B E 2550. Open only to students enrolled in professional engineering programs. (Note: M E 4300 and M E 4500 cannot be taken concurrently.) Students work in teams on a semester-long open-ended design project in which elements and subsystems are synthesized into larger systems. Formal written report required at the end of the project. Where applicable, hardware will be fabricated and tested. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (F,W)

M E 5500    (M E 4500) (WI) Advanced Engineering Design.
(M E 5500) Cr.    4

Prereq: B E 2550, M E 4250, ENG 3060. Open only to AGRADE stu­dents. Team work on semester-long project, design concepts to be developed using various design theories, students perform patent lit­erature search, design, fabricate and test prototypes. Final written report and public presentation required. Satisfies Writing Intensive course requirement. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (F,W)

M S 5996    (WI) Professional Review. Cr.    2

Open only to students in Bachelor of Science in Mortuary Science program. A comprehensive review and assessment in preparation for the National Board Examination consisting of assigned questions and in-class discussion and assessment, culminating in the Practice National Board Examination. Students receive a grade of Y at the conclusion of the course and have 60 days to take the National Board Examination after completion of the Mortuary Science profes­sional coursework.    (S)

MAT 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Mathematics. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing, satisfactory completion of the IC require­ment, consent of instructor, MAT 2030 and 2250; coreq: MAT 5420 or 6170. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a course des­ignated as a corequisite. See section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing-Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

MUH 3330    (WI) Music History and Literature III. Cr.    3

Prereq: MUH 3320 or equiv. Survey of important developments in western music history from 1900 to the present time. Concentration on major composers and styles, as well as on significant historical, philosophical, artistic and cultural influences.    (F)

MUH 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Music. Cr.    0

Prereq: MUT 2160; junior standing, satisfactory completion of the IC requirement, written consent of instructor. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for majors. Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (F.W)

N E 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Near Eastern and Asian Studies. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing, satisfactory completion of the IC require­ment, consent of instructor; coreq: any 3000-level or higher course in the department. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a designated corequisite; see section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

NFS 4210    (WI) Dietetic Practice II. Cr.    10

Prereq: NFS 4230, NFS 5250; coreq: NFS 5200. Open only to stu­dents in coordinated dietetics program. Supervised practice in spe­cialty and critical care areas and in community settings; experiences in developing, implementing, evaluating and documenting care plans for individuals needing specialized nutrition support and nutrition education programs for health promotion and for high risk groups. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (F)

NFS 6850    (WI) Controversial Issues. Cr.    2

Prereq: NFS 4230; consent of instructor; senior standing. Open only to Nutrition and Food Science majors. Topics to be announced in Schedule of Classes.    (F)

NUR 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Nursing. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing; satisfaction of IC requirement (ENG 3010 recommended); satisfactory completion of all NUR 2000-level courses: NUR 2010, NUR 2030, NUR 2060, NUR 2995, and NUR 2050; coreq: NUR 3010, NUR 3015, NUR 3020, NUR 4010, NUR 4020, NUR 4040, NUR 4050, or NUR 4120; written consent of advi­sor. Offered for undergraduate credit only. Successful completion of a written paper in a focus area of nursing. Must be selected in con­junction with course designated as corequisite; see section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

O T 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Seminar in Occupational Ther­apy. Cr.    0

Prereq: enrollment in occupational therapy program; coreq: O T 3000. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with designated corequisite; consult Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

P S 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Political Science.
 Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing, satisfactory completion of the IC require­ment, consent of instructor; coreq: any P S course numbered 3000 or higher except P S 5630 and 6640. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disciplinary writing assign­ments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a designated corequisite; see section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

PHI 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Philosophy. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing; satisfactory completion of the IC require­ment; consent of instructor and departmental undergraduate advisor; coreq: any philosophy course at the 3000 level or above except PHI 5050, 5200, 5350, and 5390. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disciplinary writing assign­ments under direction of faculty member. Must be selected in con­junction with a course designated as a corequisite; see section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement. Directed practice in rewriting assignments for the concurrently-elected course, for the purpose of perfecting skills in philosophical writing. Does not count toward the course minimums for the major or minor.    (T)

PHY 6780    (WI) Research Methods in Biomedical Physics. Cr.    3

Prereq: PHY 3700, PHY 4700. Introduction to laboratory experience in biomedical physics research. Material fee as given in Schedule of Classes.    (W)

PHY 6850    (WI) Modern Physics Laboratory. Cr.    2

Prereq: PHY 3300 or consent of instructor. Techniques and experi­ments in physics of atoms, atomic nuclei, molecules, the solid state and other areas that have advanced our modern understanding of physics. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (W)

POL 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Polish. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing, satisfactory completion of the IC require­ment, consent of instructor; coreq: any 3000-, 4000-, or 5000-level Polish literature or culture course. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disciplinary writing assign­ments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a designated corequisite; see section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (F,W)

PPR 6180    (WI) Advanced Ethics and Professional Responsibil­ity. Cr.    2

Prereq: third professional year standing and admission to Pharm.D. program. Advanced concepts in health care provision. Students required to submit a written paper, manuscript length and style, on an ethics in pharmacy project conducted as a course requirement. Sat­isfies the Writing Intensive requirement for Pharm.D. students.    (F)

PSY 3993    (WI) Laboratory in Experimental Psychology. Cr.    2

Prereq: PSY 1010 or PSY 1030; PSY 3010, and completion of Gen­eral Education IC requirement; prereq or coreq: PSY 3040 or PSY 3060 or 3080. Grade of C or better required of psychology majors. Lab investigations of perceptual, sensory, learning, and cognitive processes. . Material fee as indicated in Schedule of Classes.    (S)

R T 4360    (WI) Clinical Practicum V. Cr.    4

Prereq: R T 4350. Continued clinical practice under limited supervi­sion. Submission of essay on radiation oncology topic. Completion of clinical competency requirements. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (W)

RUS 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Russian. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior standing, satisfactory completion of the IC require­ment, consent of instructor; coreq: any 3000-, 4000-, or 5000-level Russian literature or culture course. Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Disciplinary writing assign­ments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a course designated as a corequisite; see section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (F,W)

S W 4997    (WI) Integrative Seminar in Social Work. Cr.    3

Prereq: S W 4010; coreq: S W 4998, S W 4020. Integration of class­room learning and field experiences to promote student's under­standing of social work knowledge, skills and values. Assessment of knowledge and experiential bases for generalist social work practice. Satisfies General Education Writing Intensive requirement.    (F,W)

SLP 5360    (WI) Clinical Practice in Speech-Language Pathology. Cr.    3 (Max. 9)

Prereq: SLP 6460, 6480, and 5310, each with grade of B or better; written consent of department. Supervised experience in application of methods of diagnosis and treatment of clinical cases. Material Fee As Indicated In The Schedule of Classes    (T)

SOC 4996    (WI) Sociology: Capstone Course. Cr.    4

Open only to sociology majors. Prereq: written consent of depart­ment; SOC 2000, SOC 3300, SOC 4050, SOC 4200, and SOC 4220. Prereq. for Honors students: junior or senior standing; SOC 2000, 3300, 4050, 4200, 4220; sociology major with sociology h.p.a. of at least 3.3 and cumulative h.p.a. of at least 3.0; written consent of the­sis and Honors advisers. Students choose a specific researchable topic related to the discipline and explore possible theoretical approaches. In addition, students develop a research proposal related to a topic which will include research methodology.    (F,W)

SPA 5100    (WI) Advanced Composition. Cr.    3

Prereq: SPA 3100 or placement. Study and utilization of Spanish in written form: colloquial usage, literary Spanish, commercial Spanish, idiomatic expressions. Brief compositions and translation exercises. Conducted entirely in Spanish.    (Y)

TED 5150    (WI) Analysis of Elementary Teaching. Cr.    3 or 6

Prereq: admission to College of Education. Mandatory orientation is held prior to beginning of each semester; refer to Schedule of Classes for date, time and location. Organization and management of classrooms. Lesson planning, teaching strategies and testing pro­cedures. Work in classroom assigned by both an experienced public school teacher and a University faculty member. Material Fee as stated in Schedule of Classes.    (F,W)

TED 5160    (WI) Analysis of Middle and Secondary School Teach­ing. Cr.    3

Prereq: admission to College of Education; coreq: TED 5650. Man­datory orientation is held prior to beginning of each semester; refer to Schedule of Classes for date, time and location. Overview of struc­ture, function and purposes of middle and secondary school educa­tion. Development and analysis of instructional objectives. Organization and management of classrooms. Teaching strategies and assessment of learning. Exploration and utilization of resources in the community.    (F)

THR 5993    (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Theatre. Cr.    0

Prereq: junior or senior standing, consent of instructor, satisfactory completion of the BC and IC requirements; coreq: THR 5120, or THR 6120 (or THR 5811 or THR 5812). Offered for S and U grades only. No degree credit. Required for all majors. Open only to upper division theatre majors. Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a desig­nated corequisite; see section listing in Schedule of Classes for core­quisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing Intensive Course in the Major requirement.    (T)

U S 4620    (WI) Urban Studies Senior Capstone Research. Cr.    2

Prereq: U S 4420 or GPH 6420 or CRJ 4860 or P S 3600 or SOC 4200 or consent of instructor. Development and application of research design to specified urban problems.    (Y)