Anthropology

Office: 3054 Faculty Administration Building; 313-577-2935
Chairperson: Andrea Sankar
Academic Services Officer: Susan Villerot
Undergraduate advisor: Andrew Newman
http://www.clas.wayne.edu/Anthropology/

Anthropology is a comparative social science that seeks to understand human behavior within the context of different cultural systems, past and present. Anthropology also seeks to understand human biological evolution and adaptation and their interaction with social and cultural behavior. Anthropology brings a cross-cultural knowledge base and unique methodological and conceptual tools to bear on understanding the transformations, problems and interconnections of contemporary societies. The discipline is divided into the fields of cultural, biological, linguistic anthropology,  archaeology, and applied anthropology. Wayne State’s department offers a broad-based Bachelor of Arts in anthropology.

Undergraduate training in anthropology is designed for various groups of students:

  1. those desiring scientific knowledge of the social and cultural determinants of behavior;
  2. those preparing to enter law, medicine, public health, social work, information sciences, or public administration;
  3. those preparing for employment in historical or natural science museums;
  4. those preparing to serve the business and/or industrial community as specialists in cross-cultural analysis or management consulting;
  5. those seeking to enter the field of cultural resource management;
  6. those expecting to work with the general public and, therefore, requiring a broad grasp of the nature of society, group behavior and social change;
  7. those looking forward to teaching anthropology or another of the social or behavioral sciences;
  8. those preparing for a career in another country, in international studies, or in foreign affairs;
  9. those planning to pursue careers in law enforcement, police science, or criminal justice; and
  10. those who desire to pursue graduate studies in anthropology.

ASWAD, BARBARA C.: Ph.D., M.A., B.A., University of Michigan; Professor Emeritus

BATTEAU, ALLEN W.: Ph.D., M.A., University of Chicago; B.A., Bard College; Professor

BRAY, TAMARA L.: Ph.D., M.A., State University of New York; B.A., Beloit College; Professor

CHRISOMALIS, STEPHEN: Ph.D., McGill University; B.A., McMaster University; Assistant Professor

GROSSCUP, GORDON L.: Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles; M.A., B.A., University of California, Berkeley; Associate Professor Emeritus

JUNG, YUSON: Ph.D., M.A., Harvard University; M.A., B.A., Seoul National University; Assistant Professor

KILLION, THOMAS: Ph.D., University of New Mexico; M.A., B.A., University of Connecticut; Associate Professor

LESNIK, JULIE: Ph.D., University of Michigan; B.A., Northern Illinois University; Assistant Professor

LUBORSKY, MARK: Ph.D., University of Rochester; B.A., Hobart College; Professor

LYONS, BARRY J.: Ph.D., M.A., University of Michigan; B.A., Washington University; Associate Professor

MONTILUS, GUERIN: Ph.D., University of Zurich; M.A., University of Paris, Sorbonne; B.A., Catholic University of Paris; Professor

NEWMAN, ANDREW: Ph.D., City University of New York; B.A., Bard College; Assistant Professor

RYZEWSKI, KRYSTA: Ph.D., Brown University; M.Phil., University of Cambridge; B.A., Boston University; Assistant Professor

SANKAR, ANDREA: Ph.D., M.A., B.A., University of Michigan; Professor and Chair

STILLO, JONATHAN: Ph.D., City University of New York; B.A., Central Connecticut State University; Assistant Professor

ANT 2100 (SS) Introduction to Anthropology Cr. 3-4

Study of humanity, past and present: cultural diversity and change, human evolution, biological variability, archaeology, ethnography, language, and contemporary uses of anthropology. Offered Every Term.

ANT 2110 (LS) Introduction to Physical Anthropology Cr. 3

Role of hereditary and environmental factors, human genetics, meaning of ""race"" and racial classifications, fossil records, non-human primate behavior and evolution. Offered Every Term.

ANT 2400 Food and Culture Cr. 3

Focus on food as a lens for understanding social, cultural, political, and economic issues around the world. Topics include globalization, nationalism, food restrictions, power relationships, memory, etiquettes, food movements, food security. Offered Winter.

ANT 2500 Archaeology of the Great Lakes Cr. 4

Introduction to Native cultures and archaeology of Michigan and the Great Lakes region, from the first peopling of the region through early historic times; changing patterns of adaptation to the ecology of the Great Lakes region; focus on ancient technologies and material culture, social organization, settlement patterns, economic strategies, and political formations. Offered Yearly.

ANT 2666 Fantastic Archaeology: Frauds, Myths, and Mysteries of the Past Cr. 3

What does archaeology have to do with aliens, conspiracies, the apocalypse, and corrupt politicians? This introductory archaeology course examines the fantastic frauds and meaningful myths surrounding accounts of the human past. Offered Biannually.

Restriction(s): Enrollment is limited to Undergraduate level students.

ANT 3020 Introduction to Archaeology Cr. 3

Introduction to the basic principles and science of archaeology. Case studies from all time periods and regions worldwide. Examination of the intersection of archaeology with other disciplines (history, geology, criminal justice, chemistry). Offered Fall.

Restriction(s): Enrollment is limited to Undergraduate level students.

ANT 3061 Oral History in Middle Eastern Tradition Cr. 3

Methodologies, techniques and applications of oral history used as tools to investigate modern social history of Middle Eastern societies. Offered Winter.

Equivalent: NE 3061

ANT 3100 Cultures of the World Cr. 3-4

Human societies exhibit tremendous variation. How and why do we differ? What do these differences mean in today's world. Explore, contrast, compare, understand cultures like those of the Amazon rain forest, China, Japan, Alaska, India, Central America, and urban America. View their lifestyles, politics, kinship, economics, religions through readings, discussion, film. Required for majors. Only students in Honors Program may register for four credits. Offered Every Term.

ANT 3150 (FC) Anthropology of Business Cr. 3-4

Differences between American culture/business practice and the culture/business practice of other countries: assumptions, world view and family structure, organization and language. Offered Every Term.

ANT 3200 (HS) Lost Cities and Ancient Civilizations Cr. 3

Early civilizations that developed in different parts of the world in comparative perspective. Hypotheses to explain rise and fall of civilizations, in context of ancient cultures. Basics of archaeology: how facts are formed; meaning of ""civilization."" How understanding of the past shapes understanding of the present. Geared toward the non-major. Offered Yearly.

ANT 3220 The Inca and their Ancestors Cr. 3

Introduction to precolumbian civilizations of South America. Archaeological and ethnohistorical data on ancient cultures; foundations of Inca civilization; major cultures from different regions and periods. Offered Biannually.

Prerequisites: ([ANT 2100 with a minimum grade of D-] OR [ANT 3200 with a minimum grade of D-])

Equivalent: ANT 6510

ANT 3310 Language and Culture Cr. 3

An introduction to linguistic anthropology. Using comparative approaches to language and culture across time and space, explore variation and change, cognitive dimensions of language, language evolution, linguistic myths, and the use of language in social practice. Offered Fall.

Prerequisites: ([ANT 2100 with a minimum grade of D-] OR [LIN 2720 with a minimum grade of D-])

Restriction(s): Enrollment is limited to Undergraduate level students.

Equivalent: LIN 3310

ANT 3400 Medicine, Health and Society Cr. 3

Introduction to concepts in medical anthropology; exploration of healing practices and the institutions shaping those practices. Offered Fall.

Restriction(s): Enrollment is limited to Undergraduate level students.

ANT 3410 (SS) Global Health Cr. 3

Introduces students to problems of disease and disorder worldwide and looks at various efforts to define and address these problems through a social science perspective. Offered Biannually.

Equivalent: GLS 3410, PH 3410

ANT 3520 (FC) Understanding Africa: Past, Present and Future Cr. 3

In-depth knowledge of Africa through the study of its physiography, prehistory and history, social institutions, and social changes within a global context. Offered Every Term.

ANT 3530 Native Americans Cr. 3

Survey of Native American cultures north of Mexico in historical and comparative perspective; contemporary Native American issues in an anthropological perspective. Offered Irregularly.

ANT 3540 (FC) Cultures and Societies of Latin America Cr. 3

Latin American social structures and cultural variation, history, and relationship to the United States. Themes include class, race, ethnicity, gender, religion, globalization, and immigration to the United States. Offered Irregularly.

ANT 3550 (FC) Arab Society in Transition Cr. 3

Distinctive social and cultural institutions and processes of change in the Arab Middle East. Regional variations: background and discussion of current political and economic systems and their relationship to international systems. Offered Irregularly.

Equivalent: NE 3550

ANT 3560 World's Religion Cr. 3

Explores the nature, dynamism, similarities and differences of religions in an anthropological and cross-cultural perspective. Offered Fall.

Prerequisite: ANT 2100, with a minimum grade of D-

ANT 3600 Topics in Anthropology Cr. 3

Selected topics or emerging fields in any of the four anthropology subfields (cultural; physical; archaeology; linguistics). Topics to be announced in Schedule of Classes. Offered Irregularly.

ANT 3700 (SS) Globalization: Theories, Practices, Implications Cr. 3

Students develop analytical tools for appraising processes of globalization; acquire a familiarity with the current topical concerns of global studies; and examine economic, political, and cultural approaches to globalization. Offered Fall, Winter.

Equivalent: GLS 3700

ANT 3990 Directed Study Cr. 2-6

Offered Every Term.

Repeatable for 6 Credits

ANT 4999 Honors Research and Thesis Cr. 3-6

Research and thesis to be completed under the direction of a faculty member whose expertise includes the student's area of interest. Advisor and a second reader will read the completed thesis. Offered Every Term.

ANT 5060 Urban Anthropology Cr. 3

Social-cultural effects of urbanization from a cross-cultural perspective with emphasis on the developing area of the world. The process of urbanization; the anthropological approach in the area of urban studies. Offered Yearly.

Prerequisites: ([ANT 2100 with a minimum grade of D-])

ANT 5140 Biology and Culture Cr. 3

Interrelationships between the cultural and biological aspects of humans; human genetic variability, human physiological plasticity and culture as associated mechanisms by which humans adapt to environmental stress. Offered Fall.

Prerequisites: ([ANT 2100 with a minimum grade of D-] OR [ANT 2110 with a minimum grade of D-])

ANT 5165 Shop 'Til You Drop: Consumer Society and Culture Cr. 3

Why do we want things that we don't need? Are we bound to consumerism in the global age? This course offers an overview of consumer society and examines consumption practices cross-culturally from an anthropological perspective. Offered Biannually.

ANT 5170 Political Anthropology Cr. 3

Ethnographic and comparative study of power, politics, and political organizations in non-state and state societies and in the colonial encounter; evolutionary, functionalist, practice-oriented, Marxist, feminist, and Foucauldian approaches to the study of power. Offered Irregularly.

Prerequisites: ([ANT 2100 with a minimum grade of D-] OR [ANT 5200 with a minimum grade of D-])

ANT 5180 Forensic Anthropology Cr. 3

Introductory survey of the natural, medical, and behavioral sciences with regard to forensic applications. Topics may include: toxicology, forensic pathology, fingerprints, ballistics, analysis of the human skeleton, body fluid identification. Offered Yearly.

Prerequisites: ([CRJ 1010 with a minimum grade of D-] OR [ANT 2110 with a minimum grade of D-])

ANT 5210 Anthropological Methods Cr. 4

Intensive introduction to research methods, techniques and issues in anthropology. Students engage in a research experience supervised by the instructor, write a field journal, and complete a final exam. Exercises focus on data collection, data management, and data analysis. Techniques include participant observation, fieldnotes, and interviewing. Students learn how to use software packages employed by anthropological researchers in the computer lab. Offered Fall, Winter.

Prerequisites: ([ANT 2100 with a minimum grade of D-])

ANT 5230 Mixed Methods Research Methodology Cr. 4

Introduction to statistics for students already trained in anthropological or qualitative methods; statistical concepts and techniques. Offered Biannually.

Prerequisites: ([ANT 2100 with a minimum grade of D-] OR [ANT 5996 with a minimum grade of D-])

ANT 5240 Cross Cultural Study of Gender Cr. 3

Evolutionary and cultural bases of gender roles using a world sample; division of labor, marriage and sexual behavior, power and ideology. Offered Irregularly.

Prerequisites: ([ANT 2100 with a minimum grade of D-])

ANT 5260 The African Religious Experience: A Triple Heritage Cr. 3

A triple heritage has contributed to the shaping of lives of African descent: the indigenous, Islamic and Christian religions. Analysis of these legacies, their specificity, interplay and significance in Africa, the Caribbean, South and North America. Offered Irregularly.

ANT 5270 Concepts and Techniques in Archaeology Cr. 3

For advanced upper-level undergraduates with a background in anthropology, and graduate students. Current theoretical and methodological approaches to investigation of past societies; frameworks include culture history, processual, structuralist, neo-Marxist; methods and techniques used to investigate ancient environments, subsistence strategies, ideologies, and social, political and economic organizations. Offered Winter.

Prerequisites: ([ANT 2100 with a minimum grade of D-] OR [ANT 3200 with a minimum grade of D-])

ANT 5280 Field Work in Archaeology of the Americas Cr. 4

Introduction to reconnaissance and excavation of sites; preparation and cataloging of specimens; analysis of data. Offered Spring/Summer.

ANT 5320 Language and Societies Cr. 3

For graduate students and advanced undergraduates with a background in linguistic anthropology. Students read classic and contemporary works of linguistic anthropology to expand knowledge of human language and sociality; conduct a major original research project. Offered Winter.

Prerequisites: ([ANT 3310 with a minimum grade of D-] OR [LIN 3310 with a minimum grade of D-])

Equivalent: LIN 5320

ANT 5370 Magic, Religion and Science Cr. 3

The nature and variety of religious belief and practice; theoretical interpretations. Offered Biannually.

Prerequisites: ([ANT 2100 with a minimum grade of D-] OR [ANT 5200 with a minimum grade of D-])

ANT 5380 History of Anthropology Cr. 3

Required for majors. History of ideas and explanatory theories in anthropology; continuities and disjunctures in British, French, American, German, Belgian, Russian, and Third World anthropologies. Offered Yearly.

Prerequisites: ([ANT 2100 with a minimum grade of D-] OR [ANT 7005 with a minimum grade of D-])

ANT 5400 Anthropology of Health and Illness Cr. 3

Concepts and theory in medical anthropology from cultural and biological perspectives. Topics include: cross-cultural aspects of sex and gender in health and illness, life course, sexuality, birth and death, biocultural approaches to healing and treatment, international health and epidemiology. Offered Biannually.

Prerequisites: ([ANT 2100 with a minimum grade of D-])

ANT 5410 Anthropology of Age Cr. 3

Cultural construction of the life course; age categories such as childhood and old age examined from cross-cultural, historical, political and economic perspectives. Special attention to women's aging; role of biology and ethnicity in aging and death and dying. Offered Biannually.

Prerequisites: ([ANT 2100 with a minimum grade of D-] OR [ANT 2110 with a minimum grade of D-])

ANT 5420 Anthropology Practicum Cr. 3

Field placement in a service agency or other organization. Students provide volunteer assistance to an agency while conducting participant observation research exercises. Utilization of field experience to learn about a variety of research issues and methodologies. Offered Yearly.

Restriction(s): Enrollment is limited to Undergraduate level students.

Equivalent: ANT 7420

ANT 5500 Historical Archaeology Cr. 3

Methods and theoretical approaches of historical archaeology, the archaeology of the modern world (post-1500 AD). Case studies drawn from around the world which converge on major topics and debates within the sub-field. Offered Irregularly.

ANT 5510 Pre-Columbian and Mesoamerican Civilization Cr. 3

Survey of the history and characteristics of cultures in Mesoamerica prior to and after colonization, from the Olmec and Maya to the Aztec and their descendants. Offered Biannually.

Prerequisites: ([ANT 2100 with a minimum grade of D-] OR [LAS 2010 with a minimum grade of D-])

Equivalent: LAS 3510

ANT 5515 Archaeology of the Atlantic World Cr. 3

Focus is on Caribbean, American, and African colonies over the past 500 years. Topics include: slavery, colonization, migration, diaspora, social inequality, material culture, and maritime. Offered Biannually.

Restriction(s): Enrollment is limited to Graduate or Undergraduate level students.

ANT 5565 Urban Archaeology Cr. 3

Introduction to urban archaeology. Case studies from modern and historic-period North and South America, Europe, and Australia. Special emphasis on Detroit's archaeology and how it is used to understand the city's changing urban fabric over time. Offered Biannually.

Restriction(s): Enrollment is limited to Graduate or Undergraduate level students.

ANT 5600 Museum Studies Cr. 3

Introduction to basics of museums, museum work, and museum theory. Topics include: collections management, data bases, interpretive exhibit methods, current issues in museum studies, legal concerns, role of museums as educational institutions. Offered Irregularly.

ANT 5700 Applied Anthropology Cr. 3

The application of anthropological concepts and methods to contemporary issues of public concern in the United States and abroad. Offered Fall.

Prerequisites: ([ANT 2100 with a minimum grade of D-] OR [ANT 7005 with a minimum grade of D-])

ANT 5800 Anthropological Perspectives on Business Cr. 3

Implications of applying the term ""business"" to a field or activity. Anthropological approaches to the question of how business differs from other forms of authority and commerce, particularly outside the modern, Euro-American sphere. Offered Every Term.

ANT 5900 Culture, Language and Cognition Cr. 3

Systematic investigation of the relationships among, language, cognition and culture, including issues relating to human universals, cross-cultural concept formation, metaphor, classification and the evolution of cognition and language. Offered Biannually (Winter).

Prerequisites: ([ANT 3310 with a minimum grade of D-] OR [ANT 5320 with a minimum grade of D-] OR [LIN 3310 with a minimum grade of D-] OR [LIN 5320 with a minimum grade of D-] OR [LIN 3080 with a minimum grade of D-] OR [PSY 3080 with a minimum grade of D-])

Restriction(s): Enrollment is limited to Graduate or Undergraduate level students.

Equivalent: LIN 5900, PSY 5900

ANT 5993 (WI) Writing Intensive Course in Anthropology Cr. 0

Disciplinary writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a course designated as a corequisite. See section listing in Schedule of Classes for corequisites available each term. Satisfies the University General Education Writing-Intensive Course in the Major requirement. Within first three weeks of enrollment in corequisite course, student must notify instructor of enrollment in ANT 5993. Required for all majors. Offered Every Term.

Restriction(s): Enrollment is limited to Undergraduate level students.

ANT 5996 Capstone Seminar in Anthropology Cr. 3

Required for majors. Review and integrate central practices and theories in anthropology through discussion of the four major subfields and applied areas of anthropology. Special attention will be given to new developments in the different fields. Recommended for new graduate students without extensive background in anthropology; also open to those outside anthropology who desire a thorough view of research areas and theoretical perspectives in anthropology. Offered Yearly.

ANT 6290 Culture Area Studies Cr. 3

Culture and social changes. Origins and functional relationships, regional variation in population, settlement, culture contact, religion, migration, social institutions. Topics to be announced in Schedule of Classes . Offered Irregularly.

Prerequisites: ([ANT 2100 with a minimum grade of D-])

Repeatable for 9 Credits

ANT 6420 Economic Anthropology Cr. 3

Use of economic analysis in anthropology. Difference between Western and non-Western economies and economic models; methods of analysis of non-Western economies and non-rationalized sectors of Western economies. Offered Biannually.

ANT 6510 The Inca and their Ancestors Cr. 3

Study of pre-Columbian cultures of South America. Archaeological and ethnohistorical data beginning with the Inca; foundations of Inca civilization; major cultures from different regions and periods in South American prehistory. Offered Biannually.

Prerequisites: ([ANT 2100 with a minimum grade of D-] OR [ANT 3200 with a minimum grade of D-])

ANT 6550 Practicum in Archaeology Cr. 2-4

Emphasis on application of theory, practice, and research. Topics include: cultural resource management, ceramic analysis, settlement pattern studies, materialities, historical archaeology, archaeological data management. Offered Yearly.

Repeatable for 8 Credits

ANT 6555 Cultural Resource Management and Public Archaeology Cr. 3

Practicum focuses on historical development of cultural resource management (CRM) in the U.S.; contemporary regulatory framework of CRM; practical experience in project planning, proposal writing, archival research, project management and the reporting process. Offered Biannually.

Prerequisites: ([ANT 5270 with a minimum grade of C] OR [ANT 5280 with a minimum grade of C])

ANT 6570 Archaeological Laboratory Analysis Cr. 3

Introduction to basic laboratory methods for the analysis of archaeological artifacts from both prehistoric and historic period using materials housed in the collections of the Museum of Anthropology. Offered Biannually.

Prerequisites: ([ANT 5270 with a minimum grade of C] OR [ANT 5280 with a minimum grade of C])

Restriction(s): Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ANT 6650 Studies in Physical Anthropology Cr. 2-4

Selected topics in physical anthropology. Topics to be announced in Schedule of Classes. Offered Irregularly.

Prerequisites: ([ANT 2110 with a minimum grade of D-])

Repeatable for 12 Credits

ANT 6680 Studies in Cultural Anthropology Cr. 2-4

Selected topics in cultural anthropology. Topics to be announced in Schedule of Classes. Offered Irregularly.

Prerequisites: ([ANT 2100 with a minimum grade of D-])

Repeatable for 12 Credits

ANT 6990 Grant Proposal Writing for the Social Sciences Cr. 3

Grant and proposal writing organized around elements of writing and research design; includes defining the research question, problem orientation, research objectives, funding sources, target audience, and project evaluation. Offered Biannually.

Restriction(s): Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.