Physics and Astronomy

Office: 135 Physics Research Building; 313-577-2721
Chairperson: David Cinabro
Associate Chairperson: Jogindra M. Wadehra
Academic Services Officer: J. Scott Payson
Undergraduate Academic Advisor: Dawn Niedermiller 
http://www.physics.clas.wayne.edu/

Physics is the science that describes the behavior of the physical world. It is the most basic of all sciences and as such is responsible for the interpretation of fundamental physical processes which support many other scientific disciplines. The study of physics involves many of the significant ideas that have shaped Western civilization, and the excitement of ongoing scientific challenges. Currently, physicists conduct research into the basic laws of nature and also make use of these ideas to design and develop new technologies. Thus, training in physics offers a variety of opportunities. Careers are possible in research laboratories, in academic teaching capacities, in hospitals, the military, power plants, museums, patent law firms, computer companies, and in a host of other areas.

Faculty members in this Department are devoted to teaching and research and hold national and international reputations in their areas of specialization, which include: high energy physics, nuclear physics, atomic physics, the physics of condensed matter, material science, mathematical physics, applied physics, and quantum field theory. They organize and participate in conferences, publish extensively, and receive numerous outside grants, contracts and fellowships. In addition, they engage in many collaborations with scientists in both foreign and American universities and national laboratories.

Physics Colloquium: The department colloquium is normally held Thursday afternoons. Advanced undergraduates are invited to attend.

BONVICINI, GIOVANNI: Laurea in Fisica, University of Bologna; Professor

BOWEN, DAVID: Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; B.A., Haverford College; Associate Professor

CACKETT, EDWARD M: Ph.D., University of St. Andrews; M.S., University of Durham; Associate Professor

CHU, XIANG-QIANG: Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.S., B.S., Peking University; Assistant Professor

CINABRO, DAVID A.: Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison; B.A., University of Chicago; Professor and Chair

GAVIN, SEAN: Ph.D., M.S., University of Illinois; B.S., State University of New York at Stony Brook; Professor

HARR, ROBERT F.: Ph.D., M.S., University of California, Berkeley; B.S., Carnegie-Mellon University; Professor

HUANG, JIAN: Ph.D., Michigan State University; M.S., University of South Carolina; B.S., Beijing University; Associate Professor

HUANG, ZHIFENG: Ph.D., B.S., Tsinghua University; Associate Professor

KARCHIN, PAUL E.: Ph.D., M.S., B.S., Cornell University; Professor

KELLY, CHRISTOPHER V.: Ph.D., M.S.E., University of Michigan; B.A., Oberlin College; Assistant Professor

KEYES, PAUL H.: Ph.D., University of Maryland; B.S. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Professor Emeritus

LLOPE, WILLIAM J.: Ph.D., M.S., State University of New York at Stony Brook; B.A., University of Michigan; Associate Professor

MAJUMDER, ABHIJIT: Ph.D., McGill University; M.Sc., B.Sc., Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur; Associate Professor

MORGAN, CAROLINE G.: Ph.D., Princeton University; B.S., Swarthmore College; Professor

MUKHOPADHYAY, ASHIS: Ph.D., Kansas State University; M.Sc., B.Sc., University of Calcutta; Associate Professor

NADGORNY, BORIS E.: Ph.D., State University of New York at Stony Brook; B.S., Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology; Professor

PADMANABHAN, KARUR R.: Ph.D., M.Sc., Poona University; Associate Professor

PAZ, GIL: Ph.D., Cornell University; M.S., B.A., Israel Institute of Technology; Assistant Professor

PETROV, ALEXEY A.: Ph.D., M.S., University of Massachusetts, Amherst; B.S., St. Petersburg Technical University; Professor

PRUNEAU, CLAUDE A.: Ph.D., M.Sc., B.Sc., Universite Laval; Professor

PUTSCHKE, JOERN: Ph.D., Technical University of Munich; Dipl, University of Marburg; Associate Professor

SAKAMOTO, TAKESHI: Ph.D., Kanazawa University; B.S., Nihon University; Associate Professor

SHAH, NAUSHEEN: Ph.D., University of Chicago; B.Sc., George Mason University; Assistant Professor

VOLOSHIN, SERGEI A.: Ph.D., Dipl, Moscow Engineering Physics Institute; Professor

WADEHRA, JOGINDRA M.: Ph.D., New York University; M.S., University of Nebraska; M.Sc., B.Sc., University of Delhi; Professor

ZHOU, ZHIXIAN: Ph.D., Florida State University; B.S., Lanzhou University; Associate Professor

Astronomy

AST 2010 (PS) Descriptive Astronomy Cr. 4

Lecture course that introduces the concepts and methods of modern astronomy, the solar system, stars, galaxies, and cosmology; recent discoveries about planets, moons, the sun, pulsars, quasars, and black holes. Meets General Education Laboratory requirement only when taken with Coreq: AST 2011. Offered Every Term.

AST 2011 Descriptive Astronomy Laboratory Cr. 1

Laboratory exercises and observations; includes two late evening viewing sessions. Satisfies General Education Laboratory requirement when taken concurrently with AST 2010. Offered Every Term.

Prerequisite: (AST 2010, (may be taken concurrently), with a minimum grade of C ; AST 5010, (may be taken concurrently), with a minimum grade of C ) ; PHY 5010, (may be taken concurrently), with a minimum grade of C

Course Material Fees: $25

AST 4100 Astronomical Techniques Cr. 3

Techniques of modern astrophysics. Detectors used in astronomy for optical and infrared photons, radio and microwaves, X- and gamma rays, and neutrinos. Techniques in imaging, photometry, spectroscopy, astrometry, polarimetry, and for analyzing public data available on the web. Offered Fall.

Restriction(s): Enrollment is limited to Undergraduate level students.

AST 4200 (WI) Astronomical Laboratory Cr. 2

Introduction to laboratory techniques of modern astrophysics. Optical astronomy, including measurement of the quantum efficiency of a CCD-based astronomical digital camera; measurement of the throughput as a function of wavelength of a set of standard astronomical filters; measurement of the HR diagram of a star cluster using the calibrated camera and filters. Offered Fall.

AST 4300 Planetary Astronomy and Space Science Cr. 3

Formation and evolution of the solar system: planetary surfaces, interiors, atmospheres, and magnetospheres; asteroids, comets, planetary satellites, and ring systems. Emphasis on using basic physics to understand observed properties of the solar system. Offered Winter.

AST 5010 Astrophysics and Stellar Astronomy Cr. 3

Electromagnetic radiation and matter; solar characteristics; stellar distances; magnitudes; spectral classification; celestial mechanics; binary stars; stellar motions, structure and evolution; compact and variable stars; Milky Way Galaxy and interstellar medium; galaxies and clusters of galaxies; quasars; Hubble's Law; cosmology. Offered Biannually (Winter).

Prerequisites: ([PHY 2140 with a minimum grade of C-] OR [PHY 2180 with a minimum grade of C-]) AND ([MAT 2010 with a minimum grade of C-])

Equivalent: PHY 5010

AST 5100 Galaxies and the Universe Cr. 3

Exploration of the world of galaxies, starting with the Milky Way and moving outward to larger scales. Basic properties of galaxies: galaxy classification, structure, evolution, observations of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), Quasar, and Seyfert galaxies. Discovery of dark matter and black holes. Cosmology: origins of the universe in a hot big bang; its expansion history including recent evidence that the cosmic expansion is accelerating; the cosmic microwave background, and the ultimate fate of the universe. Capstone course for astronomy majors. Offered Winter.

Physics

PHY 1001 Perspectives in Physics, Biomedical Physics, and Astronomy Cr. 1

Survey of educational and career paths including specializations in basic research and applied disciplines; recommended for entering students and those considering or beginning a major or minor concentration. Offered Fall.

Restriction(s): Enrollment is limited to Undergraduate level students.

PHY 1020 (PS) Conceptual Physics: The Basic Science Cr. 4

Physical concepts and practical applications to everyday life of the basic principles of motion, forces, energy, matter, heat, sound, electricity, magnetism, and light. Lectures, demonstrations and optional laboratory; laboratory is strongly recommended. Meets General Education Laboratory Requirement when elected for 4 credits. Offered Every Term.

Course Material Fees: $25

PHY 2020 Science, Technology, and War Cr. 4

Modern weapons, nuclear and otherwise are becoming increasingly available and dangerous; people with grievances seem eager to use them. Science and technology, as well as constraints of bureaucracy and society underpin weapons development and use, as technologies affect prospects and results of war and peace. History of humanity and its tools of war. Offered Yearly.

Equivalent: HIS 2510, PCS 2020, PS 2440

PHY 2130 (PS) Physics for the Life Sciences I Cr. 4

Introduction to physics for students in the life sciences, preparing for medicine, dentistry, pharmacy and health sciences and for general Liberal Arts and Sciences students. Covers motion, forces, energy, diffusion, fluids, thermal physics with many biological examples. Satisfies General Education laboratory requirement only when taken concurrently with PHY 2131. No credit after PHY 2170. Offered Every Term.

Corequisite: PHY 2131

PHY 2131 Physics for the Life Sciences Laboratory Cr. 1

Laboratory experiments in fluid mechanics, diffusion and biophysics. Satisfies General Education laboratory requirement only when taken concurrently with PHY 2130. Offered Every Term.

Course Material Fees: $25

PHY 2140 (PS) Physics for the Life Sciences II Cr. 4

Second part of introduction to physics for students in the life sciences, students preparing for medicine, dentistry, pharmacy and health sciences and for general Liberal Arts and Sciences students. Covers thermodynamics, electric fields, oscillations, waves and optics. Satisfies General Education laboratory requirement only when taken concurrently with PHY 2141. No credit after PHY 2180. Offered Every Term.

Corequisite: PHY 2141

PHY 2141 Physics for the Life Sciences Laboratory Cr. 1

Laboratory experiments in electric fields, fluids, optics and spectroscopy. Satisfies General Education laboratory requirement only when taken concurrently with PHY 2140. Offered Every Term.

Course Material Fees: $25

PHY 2170 (PS) University Physics for Scientists I Cr. 4

For students specializing in physics, biology, chemistry, mathematics or engineering. Statics, kinematics, dynamics, energy and linear momentum, rotational kinematics and dynamics, angular momentum, solids and fluids, vibrations and wave motion, thermodynamics. Satisfies General Education Laboratory Requirement only when taken concurrently with PHY 2171. No credit after PHY 2175. Offered Every Term.

Corequisite: PHY 2171

PHY 2171 University Physics Laboratory Cr. 1

Laboratory experiments in statics, kinematics, dynamics, energy and linear momentum, rotational kinematics and dynamics, angular momentum, simple harmonic motion, optics, continuum mechanics, thermodynamics. Satisfies General Education laboratory requirement only when taken concurrently with PHY 2170. Offered Every Term.

Course Material Fees: $25

PHY 2175 (PS) University Physics for Engineers I Cr. 4

For students specializing in engineering. Statics, kinematics, dynamics, energy and linear momentum, rotational kinematics and dynamics, angular momentum, solids and fluids, vibrations and wave motion, thermodynamics. No credit after PHY 2170. Offered Every Term.

Restriction(s): Enrollment limited to students in the College of Engineering.

PHY 2180 University Physics for Scientists II Cr. 4

Electric forces and electric fields, electrical energy, capacitance, current, resistance, direct current circuits, magnetism, induced voltage and inductance, AC circuits, electromagnetic waves, geometric and wave optics. No credit after PHY 2185. Offered Every Term.

Corequisite: PHY 2181

PHY 2181 University Physics Laboratory II Cr. 1

Laboratory experiments in electrostatics, currents and circuit elements, magnetic fields, magnetic induction, AC circuits, electromagnetic waves, interference of waves. Offered Every Term.

Course Material Fees: $25

PHY 2185 University Physics for Engineers II Cr. 4

Electric forces and electric fields, electrical energy, capacitance, current, resistance, direct current circuits, magnetism, induced voltage and inductance, AC circuits, electromagnetic waves, geometric and wave optics. No credit after PHY 2180. Offered Every Term.

Prerequisites: ([PHY 2170 with a minimum grade of C-] OR [PHY 2175 with a minimum grade of C-]) AND ([MAT 2010 with a minimum grade of D-]) AND ([MAT 2020 with a minimum grade of D-])

Restriction(s): Enrollment limited to students in the College of Engineering.

PHY 2210 General Physics Laboratory Cr. 1

Consult departmental undergraduate academic advisor prior to registering for this course. No credit after PHY 1020 if taken for four credits. Offered Every Term.

Prerequisite: PHY 1020, with a minimum grade of D-

Course Material Fees: $15

PHY 3100 (PS) The Sounds of Music Cr. 4

For music majors and other students interested in the physical foundations of the production, perception, and reproduction of musical sounds. Makes only limited use of simple mathematics. Includes topics such as wave properties, loudness levels and the human ear, hearing loss, tone quality, frequency and pitch, musical intervals and tuning, room acoustics, the production of sound by various musical instruments, and electronic reproduction of music. Meets General Education Laboratory Requirement. Offered Fall.

Course Material Fees: $25

PHY 3300 Introductory Modern Physics Cr. 3

For physics, chemistry, engineering, mathematics majors and other interested students. Introduction to relativity, quantum phenomena, atomic structure, quantum mechanics, condensed matter physics, quantum optics, nuclear physics, elementary particles, and anti-particles. Offered Fall, Winter.

Prerequisites: ([PHY 2130 with a minimum grade of C- and PHY 2131 with a minimum grade of C-] OR [PHY 2170 with a minimum grade of C- and PHY 2171 with a minimum grade of C-]) AND ([PHY 2140 with a minimum grade of C- and PHY 2141 with a minimum grade of C-] OR [PHY 2180 with a minimum grade of C- and PHY 2181 with a minimum grade of C-])

Corequisite: PHY 3310

PHY 3310 Introductory Modern Physics Laboratory Cr. 2

Laboratory course to accompany PHY 3300. Hands-on experience in logical and rigorous analysis of phenomena of modern physics. Offered Fall, Winter.

Prerequisites: ([PHY 2140 with a minimum grade of D- and PHY 2141 with a minimum grade of D-] OR [PHY 2180 with a minimum grade of D- and PHY 2181 with a minimum grade of D-]) AND ([PHY 3300 with a minimum grade of D-] OR [PHY 5015 with a minimum grade of D-])

Course Material Fees: $25

PHY 3700 Mathematics for Biomedical Physics Cr. 4

Training in specific applied topics of mathematics for biomedical physics majors. Offered Fall.

PHY 3750 Introduction to Computational Methods Cr. 1

Introduction to the principles of computer programming with MATLAB or similar software. In addition to learning applications of the software, there will be opportunities for independent or group projects of interest to students. Offered Fall.

Prerequisites: ([PHY 2130 with a minimum grade of C-, PHY 2131 with a minimum grade of C-, PHY 2140 with a minimum grade of C-, and PHY 2141 with a minimum grade of C-] OR [PHY 2170 with a minimum grade of C-, PHY 2171 with a minimum grade of C-, PHY 2180 with a minimum grade of C-, and PHY 2181 with a minimum grade of C-]) AND ([MAT 2020 with a minimum grade of C-])

Restriction(s): Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Biomedical Physics.

PHY 3990 Directed Study Cr. 1-4

Primarily for students who wish to continue in a field beyond material covered in regular courses, or who wish to study material not covered in regular courses, including certain research participation. Offered Every Term.

Repeatable for 4 Credits

PHY 4700 Introduction to Biomedical Physics Cr. 4

Basic and applied physical concepts used in biology, human anatomy, and physiology, as well as in medical diagnosis and treatment. Offered Winter.

Prerequisites: ([PHY 2130 with a minimum grade of C- and PHY 2140 with a minimum grade of C-] OR [PHY 2170 with a minimum grade of C- and PHY 2180 with a minimum grade of C-]) AND ([PHY 3700 with a minimum grade of C-]) AND ([MAT 2020 with a minimum grade of D-])

PHY 5010 Astrophysics and Stellar Astronomy Cr. 3

Electromagnetic radiation and matter; solar characteristics; stellar distances; magnitudes; spectral classification; celestial mechanics; binary stars; stellar motions, structure and evolution; compact and variable stars; Milky Way Galaxy and interstellar medium; galaxies and clusters of galaxies; quasars; Hubble's Law; cosmology. Offered Biannually (Winter).

Equivalent: AST 5010

PHY 5015 Non-classical Physics for Educators Cr. 3

Development of relativity and quantum mechanics. Emphasis on nuclear physics and elementary particles. Required math: algebra and trigonometry. Offered for undergraduate credit only. Offered Winter.

PHY 5100 Methods of Theoretical Physics I Cr. 3

Introduction to mathematical tools used in advanced courses in physics. Offered Fall.

PHY 5200 Classical Mechanics I Cr. 3

Introduction to fundamental ideas: Newton's laws, notions of momentum, angular momentum, kinetic and potential energy, mechanical energy, conservation laws, motion in 1- and 3-D, friction and retardation forces, oscillations, resonances, and gravitation. Offered Fall.

PHY 5210 Classical Mechanics II Cr. 3

Accelerated reference frames, centrifugal and Coriolis forces, rigid body dynamics, motion of tops and gyroscopes, Lagrange's equations, constraints, Lagrange multipliers, general central force problem, stability of orbits, relativistic mechanics. Offered Winter.

Prerequisite: PHY 5200, with a minimum grade of C- ; MAT 2150, with a minimum grade of C-

PHY 5340 Optics Cr. 3

Electromagnetic radiation; geometrical, physical, and modern optics. Offered Winter.

Prerequisites: ([MAT 2030 with a minimum grade of C- and PHY 2140 with a minimum grade of C-] OR [PHY 2180 with a minimum grade of C- and PHY 3700 with a minimum grade of C-] OR [PHY 2140 with a minimum grade of C- and PHY 3700 with a minimum grade of C-] OR [MAT 2030 with a minimum grade of C- and PHY 2180 with a minimum grade of C-])

PHY 5341 Optics Laboratory Cr. 2

Experiments involving geometrical, physical, and quantum optics. Offered Winter.

PHY 5620 Electronics and Electrical Measurements Cr. 3

Theory of amplifier circuits, operational amplifiers, oscillators, digital electronics, analog and digital measurements. Offered Fall.

Prerequisites: ([PHY 2180 with a minimum grade of C- and PHY 2181 with a minimum grade of C-] OR [PHY 2140 with a minimum grade of C- and PHY 2141 with a minimum grade of C-]) AND ([PHY 5621 with a minimum grade of C-])

Corequisite: PHY 5621

PHY 5621 Electronics and Electrical Measurements Laboratory Cr. 2

Laboratory measurements related to amplifier circuits, operational amplifiers, oscillators, and digital electronics. The lab will also cover analog and digital measurements and will require a final project. Offered Fall.

Corequisite: PHY 5620

PHY 5750 Biological Physics Cr. 4

Introduction to applications of physics to molecular biology. Offered Fall.

PHY 5990 Directed Study Cr. 1-3

Primarily for students who wish to continue in a field beyond material covered in regular courses, or who wish to study material not covered in regular courses, including certain research participation. Offered Every Term.

Repeatable for 6 Credits

PHY 6160 Meteorology: 2ndy Sch Cr. 3-4

Offered Spring/Summer.

Restriction(s): Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

Course Material Fees: $25

PHY 6400 Quantum Physics I Cr. 3

Operators and their eigenfunctions, quantization rules, solution of Schroedinger equation in 1- and 3-D, the hydrogen atom, angular momentum, spin, boson, fermions, Time-independent perturbation theory. Offered Winter.

Prerequisites: ([MAT 2150 with a minimum grade of C-, PHY 3300 with a minimum grade of C-, and PHY 5100 with a minimum grade of C-])

PHY 6410 Quantum Physics II Cr. 3

Applications of quantum mechanics: atoms in electric and magnetic fields, multielectron atoms, molecules, quantum statistics, solids (band structure, magnetic properties), nuclei, fundamental forces and standard model. Offered Fall.

PHY 6450 Introduction to Material and Device Characterizations Cr. 4

Lecture/laboratory; introduction to analytic and measurement techniques for characterizing and evaluating materials, especially for potential applicability in sensor and integrated devices. Techniques include diffraction and microscopy methods, electron spectroscopies, and electrical, optical and magnetic measurements. Offered for graduate credit only. Offered Winter.

Prerequisite: (PHY 7050, (may be taken concurrently), ; ECE 5500, (may be taken concurrently), ; ECE 5550, (may be taken concurrently), )

Restriction(s): Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

PHY 6500 Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics Cr. 4

Laws of thermodynamics, thermodynamic equilibrium, applications of kinetic theory of gases, basic introduction to classical and quantum statistical description of physical systems with large numbers of particles. Offered Fall.

Prerequisites: ([PHY 3300 with a minimum grade of C- and PHY 5100 with a minimum grade of C-])

PHY 6570 Smart Sensor Technology I: Design Cr. 4

Introduction to various types of sensors and the design of basic analog VLSI circuit building blocks. Offered for graduate credit only. Offered Fall.

Restriction(s): Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

Equivalent: BME 6470, ECE 6570

PHY 6600 Electromagnetic Fields I Cr. 3

Topics include electrostatics, solution of Laplace equation, dielectric media, electric current, magnetic field of steady currents, magnetic properties of matter, electromagnetic induction. Offered Fall.

Prerequisite: PHY 5100, with a minimum grade of C- ; PHY 5200, with a minimum grade of C- ; MAT 2150, with a minimum grade of C-

PHY 6610 Electromagnetic Fields II Cr. 3

Continuation of PHY 6600: Maxwell equations, electromagnetism and relativity, optics, wave guides and transmission lines, radiation of EM waves. Offered Winter.

Prerequisite: PHY 6600, with a minimum grade of C-

PHY 6710 Physics in Medicine Cr. 3

Applications of physics in medicine including radioactivity; interaction of radiation in matter; x-ray, CT, MRI, ultrasound, and PET imaging; nuclear medicine; radiation oncology; nerve electrophysiology, electrocardiogram, pacemakers, and defibrillators. Offered Winter.

Restriction(s): Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Biomedical Physics.

PHY 6750 Applied Computational Methods Cr. 2

Development of concepts learned in PHY 3750 or PHY 3310 for computer applications in physics research, including applications in theoretical physics, data fitting, image analysis, and integration with experimental equipment. There will be opportunities for independent as well as group projects. Offered Fall.

Prerequisite: PHY 3750, with a minimum grade of C- ; PHY 3310, with a minimum grade of C-

PHY 6780 (WI) Research Methods in Biomedical Physics Cr. 3

Introduction to laboratory experience in biomedical physics research. Capstone course for biomedical physics majors. Offered Winter.

Prerequisites: ([PHY 3700 with a minimum grade of C- and PHY 4700 with a minimum grade of C-])

PHY 6850 (WI) Modern Physics Laboratory Cr. 2

Techniques and experiments in physics of atoms, atomic nuclei, molecules, the solid state and other areas that have advanced our modern understanding of physics. Offered Winter.

Prerequisites: ([PHY 3300 with a minimum grade of C-])

Course Material Fees: $25

PHY 6860 Computational Physics Cr. 3

Introduction to use of computers to model physical systems; description of techniques in numerical analysis including linear algebra, integration, algebraic and differential equations, data analysis and symbolic algebra. Offered Fall.

Prerequisites: ([PHY 3310 with a minimum grade of C-] OR [PHY 5100 with a minimum grade of C-])

PHY 6991 Special Topics Cr. 1-4

Topics and prerequisites for each section to be announced in Schedule of Classes . More than one section may be elected in a semester. Offered for graduate credit only. Offered Yearly.

Restriction(s): Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

Repeatable for 4 Credits

PHY 6992 Physics Graduate Teaching Assistant Training Cr. 1

Students solve and discuss problems from calculus-based general physics courses in front of their peers and instructor, enhancing their ability to analyze, interpret and present the material in a clear, informative way. Offered for graduate credit only. Offered Fall.

Restriction(s): Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.