Group Requirements

The purpose of the Group Requirements is two-fold: to acquire a broad range of knowledge, and to develop methodological skills which encourage continued exploration on an independent level. As knowledge proliferates and the interrelatedness of separate disciplines becomes increasingly evident, the traditional goal of mastering discrete or representative bodies of common, traditional material has become obsolete; even the aim of becoming familiar with all areas of knowledge has become an impossible objective. A commitment to intellectual diversity, though, must remain a central goal of any coherent undergraduate experience, and all college students must be exposed to a broad range of basic disciplines. Thus, courses specifically designed to insure that students are adequately exposed to representative branches of knowledge are fundamental to any set of general education requirements, and course work in areas outside specialized fields is required of all undergraduates at Wayne State University. These courses provide the conceptual framework within which major and professional curricula are placed in proper perspective and supply an appropriate foundation upon which continuing self-education can take place.

In addition to providing breadth of knowledge, however, the General Education Group Requirements aim to foster awareness and understanding of how scholars and scientists in various disciplines acquire knowledge. Group requirements allow students to understand and apply the methods used in different disciplines to acquire knowledge so they will have the ability to continue to explore and learn independently throughout their university careers and throughout life.

Fundamental to any set of general education requirements at the university level are courses designed to ensure that all students have facility with certain branches of knowledge. The Group Requirements introduce students to knowledge and methods in a range of areas to provide the intellectual breadth necessary for completion of the major and for continuing self-education later in life.

To satisfy the Group Requirements, students will be introduced to materials drawn from the natural sciences: physical science, life science, and laboratory; the humanities: visual and performing arts, and philosophy and letters; and society and institutions: social science, American institutions, historical studies, and foreign culture. Courses which fulfill the Group Requirements carry a minimum of three credits and constitute broad introductions to individual academic disciplines. Such courses are designed for non-majors; however, some courses designed specifically for majors, or for those with substantial prior preparation, may also be acceptable. The following principles apply to the General Education Group Requirements:

  1. Courses which satisfy the Group Requirements must be elected from lists of approved courses.
  2. Students who place out of a course or courses which satisfy one or more of the Group Requirements will be considered to have fulfilled those portions of the  Group Requirements represented by such courses.
  3. For the purpose of satisfying these Group Requirements, students may generally elect no more than TWO courses from a single subject area as defined by the University system of Subject Area Codes (the letter prefixes to course numbers). However, majors in certain programs may take more than two courses from a single subject area to satisfy Group Requirements. This exemption applies to courses coded AFS for African American Studies majors; courses coded LAS for Latino/a and Latin American Studies majors; and to the Subject Area Code of a departmental honors major as well as courses coded HON for University Honors co-majors. Courses for these programs may be found in the Departmental sections of this bulletin.
  4. Where specified, a Group Requirement may be satisfied by approved course sequences.
  5. Pass/No Pass Grading: Courses taken for P-N grades (Pass/No Pass or Credit/No Credit) may be used to satisfy Competency Requirements; however, no course taken on this basis may be used to fulfill specific Group Requirements. Courses used to fulfill Group Requirements must be taken for a letter grade.

All students must fulfill the following Group Requirements by satisfactory completion of designated courses in each area; or, by an appropriate score on designated placement, national or departmental examinations.

Humanities (VP, PL) Group Requirement

Meaningful exposure to the humanistic disciplines produces more well-rounded and humane citizens, individuals capable of broadening their view of human experience. It also provides an indispensable creative perspective on the teachings of other disciplines. The General Education Group Requirements in the humanities afford students an opportunity to examine a range of humanistic statements and to consider some of the ways in which they are meaningful. Analyzing works drawn from across the humanities (arts, philosophy, and letters), considering the varied contexts to which they belong and within which they are properly understood, and evaluating a range of interpretations, leads to an appreciation of how imagination and intellect, working in tandem, provide insight into the nature of human experience.

To meet the humanities requirement objectives, all undergraduate students at Wayne State are required to complete successfully at least one course in the visual and performing arts, and one course in philosophy and letters as defined below (a minimum of three credits each).

Philosophy and Letters (PL) Group Requirement

Students must complete one course in philosophy, literature, linguistics, the history of rhetoric, or appropriate combinations of these subjects. The following approved options are designed to enhance understanding and pleasure; emphasis is placed on developing the fundamental skills of analysis, interpretation, and evaluation, and applying them to primary philosophical and literary materials.

Philosophy and Letters Options

CLA 1010(PL) Classical Civilization3-4
CLA 2200(PL) Introduction to Greek Tragedy3-4
CLA 2300(PL) Ancient Comedy3
COM 2160(PL) Campaigns and Social Movements3
ENG 2200(PL) Shakespeare3
ENG 2430(PL) Digital Narrative3
ENG 2510(PL) Popular Literature3
ENG 2500(PL) The English Bible as Literature3
ENG 2720(PL) Basic Concepts in Linguistics3
ENG 3110(PL) English Literature to 17003
ENG 3120(PL) English Literature after 17003
ENG 3130(PL) American Literature to 18653
ENG 3140(PL) American Literature after 18653
ENG 3170History of Film III: 1960 to Present3
FRE 2700(PL) Anguish and Commitment: European Existentialist Literature3-4
FRE 2991(PL) Understanding the Fairy Tale3
GER 2310(PL) Short Fiction from Central Europe and Russia3
GER 2700(PL) Anguish and Commitment: European Existentialist Literature3-4
GER 2991(PL) Understanding the Fairy Tale3
GLS 2700(PL) Introduction to Global Stories3
GSW 2500(PL) Humanities Perspectives on Gender, Sexuality, and Women3
HEB 3240(PL) Survey of Modern Hebrew Literature in English Translation3
HON 4200(PL) Seminar in Philosophy and Letters3
ITA 2700(PL) Anguish and Commitment: European Existentialist Literature3-4
LIN 2720(PL) Basic Concepts in Linguistics3
NE 3240(PL) Survey of Modern Hebrew Literature in English Translation3
PHI 1010(PL) Introduction to Philosophy4
PHI 1020(PL) Honors Introduction to Philosophy3-4
PHI 1100(PL) Contemporary Moral Issues3
PHI 1110(PL) Ethical Issues in Health Care3
PHI 1120(PL) Professional Ethics3
PHI 1130(PL) Environmental Ethics3
PHI 1200(PL) Life and Death3
PHI 2100(PL) Ancient Greek Philosophy3
PHI 2110(PL) Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Philosophy3
PHI 2320(PL) Introduction to Ethics3
PHI 2400(PL) Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion3
PHI 2550(PL) Introduction to Philosophy of Science3
PHI 3500(PL) Theory of Knowledge3
PHI 3550(PL) Metaphysics3
PHI 3700(PL) Philosophy of Art3
PS 3510(PL) Law, Authority and Rebellion4
PS 3520(PL) Justice4
RUS 2700(PL) Anguish and Commitment: European Existentialist Literature3-4
RUS 2991(PL) Understanding the Fairy Tale3
RUS 3600(PL) Nineteenth Century Russian Literature3
RUS 3650(PL) Russian Literature Since 19003
SLA 2310(PL) Short Fiction from Central Europe and Russia3
SPA 2700(PL) Anguish and Commitment: European Existentialist Literature3-4

(Schools and colleges may also have specific requirements, such that careful course selection can lead to meeting both General Education and college requirements. Please consult the College/School listing for specific requirements.)

Visual and Performing Arts (VP) Group Requirement

Students must complete one course in the appreciation or history of art, music, film, dance, theatre, or appropriate combinations of these media. The following approved options are designed to enhance understanding and pleasure; emphasis is placed on developing the fundamental skills of analysis, interpretation, and evaluation and applying them to primary materials in the visual and performing arts.

Visual and Performing Arts Options

 
AH 1110(VP) Survey of Art History: Ancient through Medieval3-4
AH 1120(VP) Survey of Art History: Renaissance through Modern3-4
AH 1130(VP) Encounters with the Arts of Global Africa3
AED 5050(VP) Integrating the Arts into the Elementary Classroom3
COM 2010(VP) Introduction to Film4
COM 2020(VP) History of Film3
DNC 2000(VP) Introduction to World Dance3
DNC 2310(VP) History of Dance from 1800 to the Present3
ENG 2440(VP) Introduction to Visual Culture3
ENG 2450(VP) Introduction to Film4
MUH 1340(VP) Music Appreciation: World Music3
MUH 1345(VP) Music Cultures3
MUH 1350(VP) History of American Popular Music3
MUH 1351(VP) History and Styles of Rock and Roll3
MUH 1370(VP) Music Appreciation: Beginnings to the Present3
NE 2060(VP) Hebrew/Israeli Film: Trends and Themes in Israeli Cinema3
POL 3750(VP) Polish and Yugoslavian Cinema3
SLA 3710(VP) Russian and East European Film3-4
SLA 3750(VP) Polish and Yugoslavian Cinema3
THR 1010(VP) Introduction to the Theatre3
THR 1030(VP) Introduction to Black Theatre and Performance3
THR 1041(VP) Musical Theatre Appreciation3

(Schools and colleges may also have specific requirements, such that careful course selection can lead to meeting both General Education and college requirements. Please consult the College/ School listing for specific requirements.)

Natural Science (PS, LS) Group Requirement

The evolution of science in the last four centuries has profoundly influenced the development of thought throughout the world. The natural sciences, both directly and through their applications in technology, present  society with problems as well as opportunities. By transforming cultural values and beliefs, the sciences have altered behavior and created new pathways to the future. Thus, university graduates should understand the nature and applications of scientific knowledge, the processes by means of which it is generated and tested, and its limitations and capabilities. They should be familiar with phenomena of the natural world and comprehend how theoretical explanations are provisionally accepted by the scientific community.

All students are required to complete successfully at least two courses (a minimum of three credits each) in the natural sciences (one in the physical sciences and one in the life sciences). To permit the individual student to experience the role of systematic observation in the promulgation of scientific knowledge, a minimum one-credit laboratory or interactive demonstrations or simulations must be associated with at least one of these courses.

Life Sciences (LS) Group Requirement

Students must elect one course from the fields of biology, behavioral psychology, physical anthropology, nutrition and food science, or combinations of no more than two of these areas. The following approved options are designed to explain the mechanisms which govern the behavior and functioning of living organisms; emphasis is placed on factors which control these mechanisms and the nature of scientific inquiry.

Life Science Options
 
ANT 2110(LS) Introduction to Physical Anthropology3
BIO 1030(LS) Biology Today3
BIO 1050(LS) An Introduction to Life 14
BIO 1510(LS) Basic Life Mechanisms 14
BIO 2200(LS) Introductory Microbiology 15
HON 4220(LS) Seminar in Life Science3
NFS 2030(LS) Nutrition and Health 13
PHI 2100(PL) Ancient Greek Philosophy3
PSY 1010(LS) Introductory Psychology 14
PSY 1020(LS) Elements of Psychology3
 
1

Courses can satisfy the laboratory requirement when elected for appropriate credits and/or with the appropriate laboratory. 

(Schools and colleges may also have specific requirements, such that careful course selection can lead to meeting both General Education and college requirements. Please consult the College/School listing for specific requirements.)

Physical Sciences (PS) Group Requirement

Students must elect one course from the fields of astronomy, chemistry, geology, or physics, or combinations of no more than two of these areas. The following approved options are designed to explain physical laws and their effects on the natural world; emphasis is placed on mathematical predictability and the nature of scientific inquiry.

Physical Science Options
AST 2010(PS) Descriptive Astronomy4
CHM 1000(PS) Chemistry and Your World 14
CHM 1020(PS) Survey of General Chemistry 14
CHM 1220(PS) General Chemistry I 14
CHM 1225(PS) General Chemistry I for Engineers 13
GEL 1010(PS) Geology: The Science of the Earth 14
HON 4230(PS) Seminar in Physical Science3
PHY 1020(PS) Conceptual Physics: The Basic Science 14
PHY 2130(PS) Physics for the Life Sciences I 14
PHY 2170(PS) University Physics for Scientists I 14
PHY 2175(PS) University Physics for Engineers I4
PHY 3100(PS) The Sounds of Music 14
1

Courses can satisfy the laboratory requirement when elected for appropriate credits and/or with the appropriate laboratory. 

(Schools and colleges may also have specific requirements, such that careful course selection can lead to meeting both General Education and college requirements. Please consult the College/School listing for specific requirements.)

Society and Institutions (AI, FC, HS, SS) Group Requirement

Understanding human society and institutions is a basic element of general education. To this end, students must develop a historical perspective, an appreciation for world cultures, and learn how the methods of social science are used to develop theoretical understanding of human society and institutions. Studying the social sciences assures that students are introduced to several bodies of knowledge which shed light on contemporary social problems and develop understanding of methods appropriate to social science investigation (research). The findings of social scientists address such relevant issues as race relations, family structure, the organization of social institutions, politics, economic policy, and international relations. The courses which satisfy the requirements in social science introduce the methodology of modern, empirical social science.

To meet the Society and Institutions Requirement, all undergraduate students at Wayne State are required to complete successfully at least one course in historical studies, one course in American society and institutions, one course in basic social science, and one course in foreign culture as defined below (a minimum of three credits each).

American Society and Institutions (AI) Group Requirement

Students must elect one course in this area. The following approved options are designed to promote civic literacy by studying American society from the perspective of pluralism; emphasis is placed on the organization of political bodies and the manner in which they function.

American Society and Institutions Options
HIS 1050(AI) American Civilization Since World War II4
PS 1010(AI) American Government4
PS 1030(AI) The American Governmental System3

Foreign Culture (FC) Group Requirement

A significant measure of a college education is the degree to which individual cultural assumptions can be placed in the context of a wider and more diversified world view. Such understanding leads to greater appreciation for the life style and artifacts of different peoples and a tolerance for opinions originating from disparate traditions by helping minimize narrow certainties and dispel provincial attitudes.

To meet these objectives, all undergraduate students at Wayne State are required to complete successfully at least one course (a minimum of three credits) in foreign culture elected from the following list of approved options:

Foreign Culture Options
AFS 3250(FC) Politics and Culture in Anglophone Caribbean3
AFS 3610(FC) Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Foreign Culture: The Africans4
ANT 3150(FC) Anthropology of Business3-4
ANT 3520(FC) Understanding Africa: Past, Present and Future3
ANT 3540(FC) Cultures and Societies of Latin America3
ANT 3550(FC) Arab Society in Transition3
ARB 2010(FC) Intermediate Arabic I4
ARM 3410(FC) New Soil, Old Roots: The Immigrant Experience3
CHI 2010(FC) Intermediate Chinese4
DNC 2400(FC) Introduction to African Dance3
ENG 2670(FC) Introduction to Canadian Studies3
ENG 2730(FC) Languages of the World3
FRE 2010(FC) Intermediate French4
FRE 2710(FC) Introduction to French Civilization I3
FRE 2720(FC) Introduction to French Civilization II3
GER 2010(FC) Intermediate German I4
GER 2710(FC) Survey of Germanic Culture I3
GER 2720(FC) Survey of Germanic Culture II3
GER 3410(FC) New Soil, Old Roots: The Immigrant Experience3
GKA 2010(FC) Intermediate Ancient Greek I4
GKM 2010(FC) Intermediate Modern Greek I4
GKM 3710(FC) Modern Greek Literature and Culture in English3-4
GPH 2700(FC) Introduction to Canadian Studies3
HEB 2010(FC) Intermediate Hebrew I4
HIS 2440(FC) History of Mexico3
HIS 2700(FC) Introduction to Canadian Studies3
HON 4260(FC) Seminar in Foreign Culture3
ITA 2010(FC) Intermediate Italian4
ITA 2710(FC) Italy and Italians I3
ITA 2720(FC) Italy and Italians II3
JPN 2010(FC) Intermediate Japanese I4
JPN 4550(FC) Japanese Culture and Society I4
JPN 4560(FC) Japanese Culture and Society II4
LAS 2410(FC) History of Mexico3
LAS 2420(FC) History of Puerto Rico and Cuba3
LAT 2010(FC) Intermediate Latin4
LIN 2730(FC) Languages of the World3
NE 2000(FC) Introduction to Islamic Civilization of the Near East3
NE 3225(FC) Modern Israeli Culture: A Pluralistic Perspective3
NE 3550(FC)Arab Society in Transition3
NUR 4800(FC) Transcultural Health Through the Life Cycle3
PHI 2150(FC) Chinese Philosophy3
POL 2010(FC) Intermediate Polish4
POL 2710(FC) Survey of Polish Culture3
POL 3410(FC) New Soil, Old Roots: The Immigrant Experience3
PS 2700(FC) Introduction to Canadian Studies3
RUS 2010(FC) Intermediate Russian I4
RUS 2710(FC) Introduction to Russian Culture3
RUS 3410(FC) New Soil, Old Roots: The Immigrant Experience3
SLA 3410(FC) New Soil, Old Roots: The Immigrant Experience3
SPA 2010(FC) Intermediate Spanish4
SWA 2010(FC) Intermediate Swahili4

This includes completion of any foreign language sequence through courses numbered 2010 or 2110. (Schools and colleges may also have specific requirements, such that careful course selection can lead to meeting both General Education and college requirements. Please consult the College/ School listing for specific requirements.)

Historical Studies (HS) Group Requirement

Historical studies provide insight into the development of human institutions, their similarities and differences, and the means by which knowledge about the past is acquired. Such studies reveal how contemporary perspectives evolve from past events and enhance our understanding of the present.

To meet the historical studies requirement objectives, all undergraduate students at Wayne State are required to complete successfully at least one course (a minimum of three credits) in historical studies.

The following approved options do not offer a comprehensive overview of history; rather, they are designed to introduce significant historical periods or themes in which comparative perspectives are emphasized and methods of historical studies explained.

Historical Studies Options
 
ANT 3200(HS) Lost Cities and Ancient Civilizations3
ASN 1710(HS) History of Modern East Asia3
CLA 3590(HS) Byzantine Civilization3
CLA 3720(HS) Modern Greek Cities: An Historical-Ethnographic Study3
CLA 5720(HS) Modern Greek Cities: An Historical-Ethnographic Study3
GKM 3590(HS) Byzantine Civilization3
GKM 3720(HS) Modern Greek Cities: An Historical-Ethnographic Study3
GKM 5720(HS) Modern Greek Cities: An Historical-Ethnographic Study3
GSW 2600(HS) History of Women, Gender and Sexuality in the Modern World3
HIS 1000(HS) World Civilization to 15004
HIS 1300(HS) Europe and the World: 1500-19454
HIS 1400(HS) The World Since 19454
HIS 1600(HS) African Civilizations to 18003-4
HIS 1610(HS) African Civilizations Since 18003-4
HIS 1710(HS) History of Modern East Asia3
HIS 1800(HS) The Age of Islamic Empires: 600-16003
HIS 1810(HS) The Modern Middle East3
HIS 1900(HS) History of Colonial Latin America3
HIS 1910(HS) Latin America from Independence to the Present3
HIS 1995(HS) Society and the Economic Transition3
HIS 2605(HS) History of Women, Gender and Sexuality in the Modern World3
HON 4250(HS) Seminar in Historical Studies3
LAS 1900(HS) History of Colonial Latin America3
LAS 1910(HS) Latin America from Independence to the Present3
NE 2030(HS) The Age of Islamic Empires: 600-16003
NE 2040(HS) The Modern Middle East3

(Schools and colleges may also have specific requirements, such that careful course selection can lead to meeting both General Education and college requirements. Please consult the College/School listing for specific requirements.)

Social Science (SS) Group Requirement

Students must elect one course in basic social science. The following approved options provide an overview of social structures and illustrate the role of human beings in different institutional arrangements; emphasis is placed on the approaches and methods of modern social science: the significance of theories, models, data collection, analysis, and inference.

Social Science Options
 
AFS 2210(SS) Black Social and Political Thought4
ANT 2100(SS) Introduction to Anthropology3-4
ANT 3700(SS) Globalization: Theories, Practices, Implications 3
ECO 1000(SS) Survey of Economics4
ECO 2010(SS) Principles of Microeconomics4
ECO 2020(SS) Principles of Macroeconomics4
GLS 2800(SS) Introduction to Global Issues and Institutions3
GLS 3410(SS) Global Health3
GLS 3700(SS) Globalization: Theories, Practices, Implications3
GPH 1100(SS) World Regional Patterns4
GPH 2000(SS) Introduction to Urban Studies4
GPH 3130(SS) Introductory Urban Geography4
GPH 3200(SS) Europe3
GSW 2700(SS) Social Science Perspectives on Gender, Sexuality, and Women 3
HIS 2000(SS) Introduction to Urban Studies4
HIS 2800(SS) Introduction to Global Issues and Institutions3
HON 1000(SS) The City3
LAS 3610(SS) Seminar in Latino/a Urban Problems3
PH 3300Epidemiology 4
PH 3410(SS) Global Health3
PS 1000(SS) Introduction to Political Science3
PS 2000(SS) Introduction to Urban Studies4
PS 2240(SS) Introduction to Urban Politics and Policy4
SOC 2000(SS) Understanding Human Society3
SOC 2020(SS) Social Problems3
SOC 2500(SS) Introduction to Urban Studies4
SOC 3300(SS) Social Inequality4
SOC 3510(SS) People on the Move: International Migration and its Consequences3
SOC 4100(SS) Social Psychology4
US 2000(SS) Introduction to Urban Studies4
(Schools and colleges may also have specific requirements, such that careful course selection can lead to meeting both General Education and college requirements. Please consult the College/School listing for specific requirements.)