Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

Office: 1100 W. Engineering Building; 313-577-3800
Interim Chairperson: Jeffrey Potoff
http://engineering.wayne.edu/che/

Chemical Engineering

The field of chemical engineering embraces those industries in which matter is treated to effect a change of state, energy content, or composition, and in which chemical engineers may be concerned with either the processes or the process equipment used for them. Examples of such industries are: fuels and petroleum processing; heavy, fine and pharmaceutical chemicals; textiles and fibers; food processing and products; natural and synthetic rubbers and plastics; explosives, pulp and paper; surface coatings; disposal of chemical plant wastes; atomic energy processes; environmental control and medical systems; and the general fields of biotechnology.

Areas of specialized research and support for graduate students include thermodynamics and transport properties of polymer solutions and melts, processing, rheology and separations of polymers, heterogeneous catalysis, surface science of catalytic and polymeric materials, environmental transport and management of hazardous waste, process design, control, and manufacturing based on sustainability principles, renewable energy, biocatalysis in multiphase systems, bioremediation for waste treatment, tissue engineering, and pharmacokinetics.

Materials Science and Engineering

Materials problems constitute an important area of research and development in the complex technology of our industrial society. The use of advanced materials, such as thermoplastic and thermoset polymers, intermetallic alloys, reinforced plastic or metal composites, ceramics and electronic materials, in the manufacturing of durable goods and devices has presented challenges to the profession of materials science and engineering. Materials engineers must understand the behavior of advanced materials, their chemical, mechanical, optical, thermal, and electrical properties, and the atomic or molecular structure that determines these properties. They can then apply their knowledge to the synthesis and processing of materials into useful products by controlling and improving their properties.

Areas of specialized research and support for graduate students include processing and rheology of polymers, thermodynamics and transport properties of polymer solutions and melts, computer simulation of polymeric and microporous materials, deformation and fracture of materials at elevated temperatures, effects of processing on mechanical properties of intermetallic alloys, influences of microstructure on fatigue, fracture toughness, stress cracking and corrosion in metals, nondestructive mechanical testing of composites, surface science of catalytic and polymeric materials, electronic materials and sensors for automotive applications.