Academic Catalog

Philosophy (B.A.)

Philosophy contributes to the liberal education of any student, whatever his/her predominant interest, by its emphasis on clear and cogent thought, by consideration of the interrelations of fact and value, by training in logic and the methodology of inquiry, and by a study and analysis of major philosophical outlooks.

Admission Requirements

Admission requirements for this program are satisfied by the general requirements for undergraduate admission to the University. Students who are planning to major in philosophy or who simply wish advice or consultation concerning course offerings and programs should see the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Philosophy. 

 

Program Requirements

Candidates must complete 120 credits in course work including satisfaction of the University General Education Requirements and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Group Requirements, as well as the departmental major  requirements cited below. All course work must be completed in accordance with the regulations of the University and the College governing undergraduate scholarship and degrees.

Major Requirements

Students planning to major in Philosophy should consult the department's undergraduate advisor as early as possible. Students may satisfy the major in either of two ways: with a traditional concentration or with a concentration in law, ethics and justice.

CORE COURSE (3-4 credits). All students (of either concentration) must take one of the following logic courses:

Select one of the following:3-4
Introductory Symbolic Logic
Honors Introductory Symbolic Logic
Advanced Symbolic Logic

Traditional Concentration

This option is primarily intended for those students whose interests in Philosophy are broad and general, and for those who are considering doing graduate-level work in Philosophy. A candidate pursuing this concentration must complete a minimum of ten courses in Philosophy, including the Logic Core Course (see above) as well as the following courses and selections from course groups (found in Philosophy Courses (PHI):

1. Two courses in the History of Philosophy.
Select at least one History of Philosophy course from the following:
Ancient Greek Philosophy
Philosophy of the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment
Ancient Greek Medicine and Psychology
The Presocratics and Sophists
Plato
Aristotle
British Empiricism
Kant
Select a second History of Philosophy course from the above, or from the following:
Chinese Philosophy
Islamic and Near Eastern Philosophy
Existentialism
2. Select one course in the Value Theory Group
Introduction to Ethics
Introduction to Social and Political Philosophy
Feminist Philosophy
Philosophy of Human Rights
Foundations of Law
Philosophy of Art
Social and Political Philosophy
Justice and Rights in Health Care
Philosophy of Sex and Gender
Philosophy of Law
History of Ethics
Free Will and Moral Responsibility
Foundations of Ethics
Ethics, Law, and Health
3. Select one course in the Philosophical Problems Group
Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion
Introduction to Philosophy of Science
Philosophy of Psychology
Theory of Knowledge
Metaphysics
Space, Time, and the Philosophy of Physics
Philosophy of Race and Racism
Philosophy of Science
Topics in Metaphysics
Topics in Epistemology
Philosophy of Mind
Philosophy of Language
Twentieth Century Analytic Philosophy I
4. Select four 5000-level courses, which must total at least 14 credits

NOTE: Courses taken at the 5000-level which are used to satisfy any of requirements 1-3 may also be counted toward requirement 4, though the ten-course minimum for the major must still be met. 

Law, Ethics and Justice Concentration

This option is intended for students who have a special interest in ethical issues, social justice, philosophy of law, or pre-law. A candidate pursuing this concentration must complete a minimum of ten courses in Philosophy, including the Core Courses (see above) as well as the following courses and selections from course groups:

1. One course in the History of Philosophy group
Ancient Greek Philosophy
Philosophy of the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment
Ancient Greek Medicine and Psychology
Chinese Philosophy
Islamic and Near Eastern Philosophy
Existentialism
The Presocratics and Sophists
Plato
Aristotle
British Empiricism
Kant
2. Select one course from the Philosophical Problems Group
Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion
Introduction to Philosophy of Science
Philosophy of Psychology
Theory of Knowledge
Metaphysics
Space, Time, and the Philosophy of Physics
Philosophy of Race and Racism
Philosophy of Science
Topics in Metaphysics
Topics in Epistemology
Philosophy of Mind
Philosophy of Language
Twentieth Century Analytic Philosophy I
3. PHI 2320 - (PL) Introduction to Ethics
4. One course in Philosophy of Law, Politics, or Human Rights
Introduction to Social and Political Philosophy
Philosophy of Human Rights
Foundations of Law
Social and Political Philosophy
Philosophy of Law
Ethics, Law, and Health
Or other approved course in social and political philosophy, philosophy of law, ore human rights. 1
5. One course in Applied Ethics
Contemporary Moral Issues
Ethical Issues in Health Care
Professional Ethics
Environmental Ethics
Race, Sex, and Religion
Feminist Philosophy
Justice and Rights in Health Care
Philosophy of Sex and Gender
6. One advanced course in Ethics 2
History of Ethics
Free Will and Moral Responsibility
Foundations of Ethics
7. Two total 5000-level courses in the Theory of Value, from the following: 5240, 5250, 5260, 5270, 5280, 5290, 5300, and 5330 (choice for requirement 6 and any other 5000-level choices from above requirements count here too)
8. Four total 5000-level courses (choices for requirements 6 and 7, and any other 5000-level choices from above requirements count here too)

NOTE: Courses taken at the 5000-level which are used to satisfy any of requirements 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6 may also be counted toward requirement 8), though the ten-course minimum must still be met. 

Philosophy Honors

Admission to the honors program in philosophy is determined on the basis of the student’s overall record. The student will normally be required to have

  1. a minimum grade point average of 3.3,
  2. credit in at least three philosophy courses, and
  3. a ‘B’ or better average in philosophy courses.

To remain in the philosophy honors program, the student must maintain a ‘B’ or better average in philosophy courses.

Honors Requirements: To receive an Honors Degree, the candidate must complete the course requirements for the regular major. In addition the candidate must complete a total of at least fifteen credits of Honors-designated coursework, including:

  1. PHI 4890 during the candidate's senior year;
  2. one 42XX honors seminar offered through the Honors College;
  3. at least six additional credits of Honors-designated coursework in Philosophy (other thanPHI 4890); and
  4. additional credits of Honors-designated coursework as needed to reach the fifteen-credit minimum.

At graduation, the overall grade point average must be at least 3.3. If at any point the student fails to maintain Honors standards, his or her credits will automatically be counted towards the regular degree major. Students interested in becoming candidates for the Honors Degree in philosophy should consult the Department’s undergraduate advisor as soon as possible.

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